Whether you celebrate it religiously or take more of a cultural, pastels-and-egg-coloring approach (or some combo of the two), Easter is a super fun spring holiday. And while planning fun activities that involve frolicking happily in the grass may seem just as daunting as picking out your kids' adorable dresses and bowties and actually getting them to wear–not destroy—said outfits, it doesn't have to be that way!

We've worked with one of our favorite bloggers, Niña Williams (an Iowa-based home décor expert of HGTV fame), and rounded up six of our favorite creative ways to celebrate the holiday, from cookie decorating to piñata-making, each of which will feel like arts and crafts to them and look Insta-worthy to you. (Plus, there's no real, live bunny pooping everywhere to worry about, so that's a win.)

1. Stuff a bunny piñata

What kid doesn't love a reason to take a baseball bat to a hanging object and be rewarded with mountains of candy, right? And since April is exactly six months from October, it seems like treating Easter as the Halloween of the spring is, well, totally fair. If you're feeling extra crafty, you can make your own with a little papier-mâché and cardboard, or take the slightly less time-intensive route and buy an empty bunny shell to fill at home. (No shame in the latter!) To stay perfectly on-theme, go for Easter treats like Kinder's yummy cream-filled chocolate eggs: They're made with milk chocolate, have no preservatives and come in adorable Easter-relevant foil, so your kids won't forget why they're allowed to chow down on sweets at 11am on a Sunday. It's a win for all, really.

2. Make egg-themed cookies

Here's a secret: Egg-shaped cookies are really, really easy to make because they're just ovals. So whether you shape your cookie dough by hand, let your minis do it or use a proper cookie cutter, chances are, they'll look the part. When they're all baked and ready comes the really fun part: Frosting them! Set up decorating stations in your kitchen with various color icings, sprinkles and more and let your kids design their own treats. You can even turn it into a competition and bring in other family members to judge—even if Grandma and Grandpa will just say that everybody wins.

3. Decorate their own Easter baskets

Okay, so we're not breaking any new ground here, but let's be honest: Decorating Easter baskets is a fantastic seasonal pastime, and for good reason. A few glue sticks, some construction paper, stickers, and perhaps some glitter (if you're brave), and you've got yourself a proper art studio in the making. Let your littles color and attach their own decor to store-bought white baskets, and encourage them really make it their own. One great way to up the ante? Use the baskets they start this year and then put them away for next year, so they can build on their hard work. It's a good way to get them to put extra care into it, and it's great to see how their design skills progress as they get older.

4. Leave a bunny basket

Santa gets a treat—shouldn't the Easter Bunny get one, too? It's only fair, even if there's no chimney-descent to speak of. Start with Kinder's Easter Gift Pack (complete with adorable stuffed unicorn or lamb and 12 Kinder chocolate eggs), and have your kids decorate the outside for a handmade touch of Easter <3. "I'm for anything that makes my life easier, so I love this idea of a pre-packaged Kinder Chocolate Gift Pack," raves Williams. The package even comes with a "to/from" card attached, so all you have to do is have them sign (or you know, scribble) their names and guess what? The real winner of this endeavor is, of course, YOU, mama, because someone has to eat that candy before the kids wake up from their naps, amiright?

5. Paint an egg mural

What's better than art projects you can do outside? Not only will it help foster their creativity, but it'll also get them some much needed post-winter Vitamin D (and let them take a break to run around when needed). If the weather permits, spread out a giant piece of paper on your patio or on a blanket on your lawn, bring out some kid-safe paints and brushes and get to work! You can mix and match pastel colors, show them how adding white paint in with bolder hues makes it more muted, and let them get a little messy. Let their masterpiece dry in the sun and hang it in your kitchen to marvel at during Easter brunch!

6. Bake a candy cake

If you haven't picked up on it yet, sweet treats are a theme here. Not only is baking together prime for memory making, but it also is a great way to pass the time if the weather is less-than-ideal (April showers and all that). But don't just bake any cake for Easter, go all-out on a candy cake. It's simple: Take two boxes of cake mix (yes, two, but bear with us) and make two round cakes; layer them with frosting, and frost the outside of the stacked final product. Then, have fun! Use things like miniature Kinder chocolate eggs (Williams is a huge fan of eating some as you go, too: "My kids love anything that includes candy, and they especially liked snacking on these Kinder Chocolates while decorating their Easter treats!") and anything else you find delicious to make a beautiful creation that will haunt your dentist's dreams.

This article was sponsored by Kinder. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.


Raising a mentally strong kid doesn't mean he won't cry when he's sad or that he won't fail sometimes. Mental strength won't make your child immune to hardship—but it also won't cause him to suppress his emotions.

In fact, it's quite the opposite. Mental strength is what helps kids bounce back from setbacks. It gives them the strength to keep going, even when they're plagued with self-doubt. A strong mental muscle is the key to helping kids reach their greatest potential in life.

But raising a mentally strong kid requires parents to avoid the common yet unhealthy parenting practices that rob kids of mental strength. In my book, 13 Things Mentally Strong Parents Don't Do, I identify 13 things to avoid if you want to raise a mentally strong kid equipped to tackle life's toughest challenges:

Keep reading Show less
Learn + Play