Menu

Kate Upton is a mama! ๐ŸŽ‰

Upton and her husband, baseball player Justin Verlander, welcomed a baby girl last week and just announced her name to the world.

Genevieve Upton Verlander was born on November 7, according to her parents' Instagram posts.


Upton and Verlander both posted black and white shots of special moments with their new baby girl.

"Welcome to the world Genevieve Upton Verlander. You stole my โค๏ธ the first second I met you!" Verlander captioned a photo of his baby girl's tiny hand in his own.

This is hardly the first time Verlander has served up sweet social media comments about becoming a dad.

When Upton announced her pregnancy via Instagram back in July, her husband was quick to show up in her comments.

"You're going to be the most amazing Mom!! I can't wait to start this new journey with you!" he wrote. "You're the most thoughtful, loving, caring, and strong woman I've ever met! I'm so proud that our little one is going to be raised in this world by a woman like you! I love you so much."

Too sweet. ๐Ÿ˜

The name Genevieve

According to the Social Security Administration, the name Upton and Verlander chose for their baby girl has been on the rise since 2000. That year, the name Genevieve was ranked 509 in terms of popularity (Emily was number 1 that year). By 2015, 1772 American babies were names Genevieve, bringing it up to 182 on the SSA's list of the top 1000 baby names.

It seems Genevieve peaked in 2015, as the name fell a couple places last year, but with Upton and Verlander choosing it for their baby girl it may see a resurgence.

Congratulations to baby Genevieve on her beautiful name, and to Upton and Verlander on her arrival. ๐ŸŽ‰

You might also like:

Try this: Write down your name and those of your parents and then your children. Then locate each letter of each name on the keyboard and note if it is located on the left or right side (use T, G and B as the middle line).

There should be more left-side letters in yours and your parents' names and more right-side letters in each of your children's names. Weird, huh? That's what some scientists thought, too, so they set out to determine why and discovered a similar pattern across five languages.

Keep reading Show less
Life