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Yay! The baby is here! You are so very excited to go and meet her and fuss over the brand new mama.

But hang on a second. Before you do, make sure you are equipped with some key rules to keep in mind to help the visit be a welcome pleasure, and not a strain.

Here's what to know before visiting a newborn (and a new mama).


1. Remember, it's about them, not you

Your desire to visit a new mom and her baby is out of complete and utter love for them, I know! But sometimes we get so excited to meet the baby and shower the mama with love that we forget that, really, they are the stars of the show.

Make sure the visit is focused on her (probably not the time to start venting about work). She should not have to entertain or serve you during the visit.

Ask her when the best time for a visit is, and perhaps most importantly, be understanding if she says she doesn't actually want to be visited right now. Which brings us to...

2. Do not be offended

She loves you. She appreciates you offering to visit her, she really does. But she may just not be ready for a visit—and that needs to be okay.

Let her know, before she even has to say it, that you completely understand if she's not ready for a visit yet and that you won't be offended. If she says she's not, try saying, “I completely get it! I'd probably feel the same way! It's a standing offer though. How about we touch base again in a week or two and see how you're feeling then?"

As you know, each woman and birth is completely different. Some women will be craving social interactions, while others will go into hibernation mode. She needs your support to know that that's okay—by doing so, you are setting the precedent that she is allowed and encouraged to care for herself as a mom. What a priceless gift!

3. Call first

No pop-ins. Ever. End of discussion.

Beyond that, give her a quick call or send a text to let her know that you're on your way, even when you've scheduled the visit ahead of time. She may be in the middle of a nap or feeding the baby, and she'd really appreciate the advanced notice (and opportunity to say, “EEK, can you give us an extra 15 minutes actually?")

Psst: Score extra points on that call by saying the following: “Hey, I'm on my way! I'll be passing by Starbucks/the grocery store/Target/etc. on my way. Anything I can grab for you?"

4. Be super mindful of germs

She is probably very concerned about germs right now—most new moms are—and for good reason. Newborns don't have much immunity, so even a small infection can turn into a problem.

Here's how you can help:

  • Do not visit if you are sick, or have been around sick people (if your child has a bad cold, you should cancel, even if the child isn't coming).
  • Don't bring your kids, even if they are not sick, unless she specifically says it's okay. Kids are little germ transporters and it may make her feel concerned to have them there (even though she loves your kids).
  • Wash your hands when you arrive, before she asks you to. It can feel a little awkward to have to say, “Hey, sorry, can you wash your hands?" Instead, the moment the door opens, say, “Hi! It's so good to see you! Before I come close to you, can you tell me where I should go wash my hands?"
  • Don't kiss the baby. I know, I know! So hard! But unless you know for a fact it's okay with her, avoid the temptation.

5. Bring food!

Nothing says love like lasagna. And chili. And brownies. Make sure you're aware of any dietary restrictions or dislikes, and then go for it! Extra points given for a meal for today and a meal to be frozen for later. Inspiration here!

If you are not a chef, consider a gift card for a local restaurant that delivers, or food delivery service.

6. Be helpful

(And make sure it's help she wants, not help you think she wants.)

Here are some ideas:

  • Offer to hold the baby so she can take a nap or shower.
  • Ask her for a shopping list you can grab ahead of time.
  • Walk her dog.
  • Play with the older sibling.
  • Offer to clean something without implying that it's messy. Try saying, “Is there anything you need done that's totally stressing you out? I'd love to relieve some stress for you."

7. Be thoughtful with the questions you ask

Again, you are so well-intentioned. But new moms can be sensitive, and may perceive the questions you're asking as judgmental without you even realizing it.

Instead of, “Are you breastfeeding?" Try, “He looks so healthy!"

Instead of ,“Is he sleeping through the night yet?" Try, “I remember how tired I was after I gave birth. Let me know if you want to take a nap!"

Instead of, “Did you get an epidural? Try, “Do you feel like talking about your birth at all?"

Instead of, “Are you so in love?" Try, “How are you feeling?"

This last one is really important—not all moms fall in love with their babies right away. And, they may be silently experiencing postpartum depression or anxiety, which can alter her connection to her baby. Questions that assume that everything is picture perfect may make her feel guilty and sad.

Instead, ask her with genuine concern how she's feeling. Let her know that you are a safe person to come to if she needs support. If she does tell you she's depressed, urge her to get mental health care right away, or call 911.

8. Do not comment on her house or body

Pretty much the last thing she wants to deal with right now is being self-conscious about a messy house or leaking breasts.

“Yikes, it looks like a tornado came through here!" or “Oh, you're boobs are huge!" or, “You look exhausted" are not okay. It sounds ridiculous, but it happens—a lot.

You could say, “Her nursery is so adorable!" or, “You are absolutely glowing."

9. Do not comment on her parenting choices

This is not the time for unsolicited advice, no matter how much you may know. Decisions like how her baby is being fed, whether or not her son was circumcised, her decision to go back to work or stay home—it's all so personal and probably comes with doubt, no matter what she's decided.

If she asks you, go for it (gently). If not, please don't bring it up.

10. Leave

She will love seeing you, but it's really important not to overstay your welcome. She needs to sleep, bond with her baby, or binge watch a series on Netflix in peace. Make sure to give her that opportunity.

Bonus! Check back in a few weeks.

She will be flooded by well-wisher and visitors during the weeks right after birth—and then it all goes away, just as motherhood is starting to get really hard. This is when she actually needs you the most.

Set a reminder in your phone and when the baby is 4 weeks old, call her and see if you can visit again. Ask if she and the baby want to go grab lunch, bring her over another lasagna, or simply tell her you're thinking about her.

She is so lucky to have you in her life. Now go see that cute baby (but call first)!

Don't want to show up empty handed? Here are some goodies we love that she might appreciate.

Eco Pea bamboo diapers

Eco Pea bamboo diapers

Seriously, you can never have too many diapers in those first weeks. These ultra-luxe bamboo diapers feel like cloth but are totally disposable.

$15

Sontakey "I Was Made For This" bracelet

Sontakey "I Was Made For This" Bracelet

The sweetest way to acknowledge a new and powerful mama, this delicate oath band is made to be worn all day, everyday.

$35

TÖST non-alcoholic refresher

Tost non-alcoholic refresher

Toast that beautiful new bundle with a sophisticated and delicious non-alcoholic sparkling refresher. With fizzy flavors of white tea, cranberry and ginger, no one will even miss the champagne. (And it comes in a pack of six, so it's perfect for stocking up for your next visit!)

$50

We independently select and share the products we love—and may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

When I was expecting my first child, I wanted to know everything that could possibly be in store for his first year.

I quizzed my own mom and the friends who ventured into motherhood before I did. I absorbed parenting books and articles like a sponge. I signed up for classes on childbirth, breastfeeding and even baby-led weaning. My philosophy? The more I knew, the better.

Yet, despite my best efforts, I didn't know it all. Not by a long shot. Instead, my firstborn, my husband and I had to figure it out together—day by day, challenge by challenge, triumph by triumph.

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The funny thing is that although I wanted to know it all, the surprises—those moments that were unique to us—were what made that first year so beautiful.

Of course, my research provided a helpful outline as I graduated from never having changed a diaper to conquering the newborn haze, my return to work, the milestones and the challenges. But while I did need much of that tactical knowledge, I also learned the value of following my baby's lead and trusting my gut.

I realized the importance of advice from fellow mamas, too. I vividly remember a conversation with a friend who had her first child shortly before I welcomed mine. My friend, who had already returned to work after maternity leave, encouraged me to be patient when introducing a bottle and to help my son get comfortable with taking that bottle from someone else.

Yes, from a logistical standpoint, that's great advice for any working mama. But I also took an incredibly important point from this conversation: This was less about the act of bottle-feeding itself, and more about what it represented for my peace of mind when I was away from my son.

This fellow mama encouraged me to honor my emotions and give myself permission to do what was best for my family—and that really set the tone for my whole approach to parenting. Because honestly, that was just the first of many big transitions during that first year, and each of them came with their own set of mixed emotions.

I felt proud and also strangely nostalgic as my baby seamlessly graduated to a sippy bottle.

I felt my baby's teething pain along with him and also felt confident that we could get through it with the right tools.

I felt relieved as my baby learned to self-soothe by finding his own pacifier and also sad to realize how quickly he was becoming his own person.



As I look back on everything now, some four years and two more kids later, I can't remember the exact day my son crawled, the project I tackled on my first day back at work, or even what his first word was. (It's written somewhere in a baby book!)

But I do remember how I felt with each milestone: the joy, the overwhelming love, the anxiety, the exhaustion and the sense of wonder. That truly was the greatest gift of the first year… and nothing could have prepared me for all those feelings.

This article was sponsored by Dr. Brown's. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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My husband and I always talked about starting a family a few years after we were married so we could truly enjoy the “newlywed” phase. But that was over before it started. I was pregnant on our wedding day. Surprise!

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