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It's completely quiet when my kids are at school—and that's exactly what I need

These long stretches of solitude help recalibrate my body and mind.

It's completely quiet when my kids are at school—and that's exactly what I need

My mom came over for lunch the other day and said, "It's so quiet in here. You don't turn on the TV?"

And the answer is no. Once my children leave for school, I spend most of my work day in complete silence. No music. No television. No phone except for the occasional conference call. If I go out to run errands, I leave the car radio off.

These long stretches of solitude help recalibrate my body and mind. Because when you think about it, our motherhoods all began with sounds that intensified over time, seeping into every nook and cranny of our beings.

It started with the beeping of hospital machines, onslaught of visitors, nurses barking instructions and shifting our breasts into gaping newborn mouths. Those infant cries that went on for months—tiny humans screeching into the world, crying so hard their arms and little fists shook with might.

The noise only magnifies as our children grow.

There have been temper tantrums, fights between siblings, wrestling that turned into wailing. Kid birthday parties of 20+ little ones where laughter and screaming seem to reach deafening roars that prevent you from paying attention to the parent who is patiently trying to hold a conversation.

The chaos that is par for the course of motherhood all feels very uncomfortable to me. I'm non-confrontational by nature, I hate crowds, and I feel awkward when I raise my voice. Even as a young girl, I'd retreat to my room to read or sneak away during big family parties and always preferred having two or three best friends over being part of a large group.

Ironically, I married a gregarious man whose normal speaking voice is SO LOUD, and we have two very talkative, energetic, highly excitable kids—exactly what happy, healthy children should be. But when all the noise dies down and I'm alone, I prefer to be quiet.

There's the silence that is productive.

It's answering work emails, writing, ordering groceries online, making all the beds in the house, and folding piles of laundry all with the grace of a motherly monk who's simply going through the motions without any external distractions.

There's the silence that is calming.

It's that rare trip to the spa or the nail salon or savoring a cup of tea outside on the deck where the only sounds you hear are birds and the wind. It's getting lost in a book that's so good you forget what time it is.

There's the silence that is empowering.

It's tackling a huge project, writing an email you've been putting off, strategizing a plan that could catapult a far-off dream into reality. It's finally booking that way-too-expensive trip to celebrate your ten-year wedding anniversary.

There's also the silence that is lonely.

It's that time of day when you start to really, really miss your kids and wonder what they're doing at that exact moment. It's the second you realize you haven't spoken to another human in six hours and you're starting to talk to yourself and think it'd be a good idea to call your best friend or husband or your mom.

And then they're home! Those loud, happy children.

They rush into the house, sharing stories about friends and fun school projects and a surprise performance by Red Grammer. Dumping their backpacks, hats and gloves at the front door, hungry for snacks, and wanting so badly to interact with you—the one person they've missed the most all day.

And thank God for this noise because it pulls you back—keeping you focused and clear minded and appreciative of your deliriously noisy and wonderful life.

For me, spending most of my day in silence is therapeutic. It's the equivalent of getting a good night's sleep or taking a long walk. It gives me the chance to recharge. So mama, find your equilibrium because it's within the balance of the light and the dark—the silence and the cacophony—that is your wonderful, beautiful life.

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These new arrivals from the Motherly Shop are *so* good you need them all

Noodle and Boo, Mushie and Plan Toys—everything you need, mama.

Motherhood is hard work—finding great products and brands to make the journey easier doesn't have to be. Each week, we stock the Motherly Shop with brilliant new products we know you'll need and love from brands and makers that really care.

So, what's new this week?

Noodle and Boo: Holistic baby skin care

Through working with chemists who specialize in natural and holistic skin care, Noodle and Boo has developed exclusive formulas that nourish, replenish and protect especially delicate, eczema-prone and sensitive skin—including laundry detergent. Their signature, obsession-worthy scent—which is subtly sweet, pure and fresh—is the closest thing to bottling up "baby smell" we've ever found.

Mushie: Kids' dinnerware that actually looks great

We're totally crushing on Mushie's minimalist dinnerware for kids. Their innovative baby and toddler products leverage Swedish design to marry both form and function while putting safety front and center. Everything is created in soft, muted colors from BPA-free materials.

Plan Toys: Open-ended toys that last

Corralling and cleaning up the toys becomes less stressful when you bring home fewer, better, more beautiful ones. Plan Toys checks all the boxes. Made from re-purposed rubber wood, they're better for the planet as well.

Not sure where to start? Here's what we're adding to our cart:

Mushie silicone baby bib

Mushie silicone baby bib

There's no going back to cloth bibs after falling in love with this Swedish design. The pocket catches whatever misses their mouths and the BPA-free silicone is waterproof and easy to wipe down between uses.

$13

Mushie kids' square dinnerware plate set

Mushie kids' square dinnerware plate set

We're totally crushing on the soft muted colors that flow with our table aesthetics and the thoughtful high-sided design that helps babies and toddler who are learning to feed themselves.

$15

Noodle and Boo nursery essentials kit

Noodle and Boo nursery essentials kit

Stocked with everything a new mama needs to care for her little one's delicate skin, Noodle and Boo's nursery essentials gift set is the perfect way to create a holistic and natural skin care routine from day one.

$45

Plan Toys doctor set 

Plan Toys doctor set

Ideal for quiet time and imaginative role play, we love the gorgeous planet-friendly doctor kit from Plan Toys. The rubber wood stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, thermometer, syringe and reflex hammer pack up neat and tidy into the red cotton case should they need to dash off on a rescue mission.

$30

Noodle and Boo instant hand sanitizer

Noodle and Boo instant hand sanitizer

Since we're buying and using hand sanitizer by the truckload these days, we're thrilled Noodle and Boo has made one we can feel good about using on little ones who cram their hands in their mouths 24/7. Not only does it kill 99.9% of germs, but it also leaves hands moisturized as well.

$10

Plan Toys natural wooden blocks set

Plan Toys natural wooden blocks set

A toy box isn't complete without a set of blocks—and this set is one of our new favorites. The sustainable, re-purposed wood is eco-friendly, comes at a relatively affordable price point and are certain to last well beyond multiple kids, hand-me-downs and even generations.

$30

Noodle and Boo family fun pack cleansing set

Noodle and Boo family fun pack cleansing set

Because their products were developed for delicate and eczema-prone skin, Noodle and Boo's full line of skin care has become a favorite among those with sensitive skin of all ages. This set is the perfect way to pamper the entire family.

$48

Mushie kids' round dinnerware bowl set

Mushie kids' round dinnerware bowl set

No need to sacrifice safety or design with the sustainable dinnerware from Mushie. Their minimalist, functional dishes are perfect for serving up meals and snacks to your tablemates who might hurl it to the floor at any point. They're made in Denmark from BPA-free polypropylene plastic mamas can feel good about and dishwasher and microwave-safe as well.

$14

Plan Toys geo stacking blocks

Plan Toys geo stacking blocks

The best engaging, open-ended toys are the ones that are left out and available, inviting little (and big!) ones to play. These beautiful gem-like blocks make for addicting coffee table play for the entire family.

$30

Plan Toys wooden green dollhouse

Plan Toys wooden green dollhouse

Energy-efficient design isn't just for grown-up real estate. This green dollhouse includes a wind turbine, a solar cell panel, electric inverter, recycling bins, a rain barrel, a biofacade and a blind that can adjust the amount of sunlight and air circulation along with minimalist furniture we'd totally love to have in our own houses.

$250

We independently select and share the products we love—and may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

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