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I love having kids close in age—here are 10 unexpected reasons why

6. It has forced me to let go of some unnecessary control.

I love having kids close in age—here are 10 unexpected reasons why

Having kids really close in age is...hmmm...there are so many ways to end that sentence. It's exciting. It's scary. It's interesting. It's intimidating. It's helpful. It's honestly wild—but also very, very cool.

Giving my children the gift of siblings, and particularly ones that are similar in age, has been magical to watch. It's definitely not always perfect (not even close), but it is our reality—and even though it's super busy—I really love it.

I love watching them communicate with one another in what is basically their secret language. I adore listening to them make each other laugh. And I feel confident that this is what my motherhood path was meant to be.

It reminds me of growing up with my four siblings, all close in age—my mom had five kids within eight years. It was always hectic growing up, but I loved having a sibling to play with who was usually interested in the same stuff I was. And now that we're all adults, we're still super close and I guess that gives me hope that my kids will always be close too.

I'm 36 weeks pregnant with baby number three, and will soon have three under four. If that sounds overwhelming to you, it's because...well, it is. But it's our overwhelm. And I've personally found many pros to deciding to have our kids close together.

1. They have a built-in best friend.

They have a strong bond already. They teach each other things. They always have someone around to play with. Their chatter before bed, when we leave the room, is probably one of the cutest things in the world. And they're very protective of each other.

2. They are on similar schedules for awhile.

For the most part, we are all on the same routine/schedule. They wake up around the same time as each other in the morning. We eat meals at the same time. They bathe together. And sometimes, they even nap at the same time. (Those days are golden!)

3. I've been in the baby/toddler parenting groove for a few years now.

I have been in the baby/toddler phase since the start of 2014 and haven't left yet. Won't for a while. So everything we're doing and going through is the "norm" for me right now. I'm still in the mindset of caring for children who aren't yet fully independent.

4. They share similar interests.

They typically love the same TV shows and movies, the same toys, books and activities—and the hand-me-down clothes stay in style when you don't have a big gap between wears.

5. I have an excuse for feeling a little out of it.

Things are just downright wild some days. I work from home, am managing the kids and house and various other things—it's just wild. But I have an excuse for feeling like I'm losing my mind. My close-in-age kids! (Though I'm pretty sure I'd feel this way with three kids spaced out too.)

6. It has forced me to let go of some unnecessary control.

Things can't be perfect. The house can't look perfect while the kids are behaving and listening perfectly while I'm also getting the exact perfect amount of work done while cooking the perfect meal. That's not going to happen with one kid, with multiple kids spaced out, and it definitely isn't going to happened when you have children who are close in age. You're needed too much for everything to be perfect.

7. I am able to be more spontaneous than I used to be.

Because my kiddos are on the same schedule and things are often pretty busy, I'm forced to make decisions quickly and just go with it. So, that's what I try to do—pivot when necessary and redirect when possible!

8. I know how to ask for, and accept, help.

I was so proud as a new mom—I wanted to do everything by myself, in my own way, on my own terms with my oldest daughter. Now, with a 3-year-old, a 1-year-old, and soon, a newborn, too—I ain't got time for pride! I can admit when I'm overwhelmed or when I could use help. And I accept that help with grace and gratefulness.

9. I am a bolder, more confident woman.

I need to speak up more. Because, as I've recently noticed, people aren't shy about commenting on how many children I have or how completely shocked they act when you tell them your kiddos (similar) ages or how many times you hear, "Boy! Your hands are going to be full huh?!" as they look from your children to your big baby bump. Yes, they already are THANKYOUFORNOTICING.

10.  My heart is bigger and more open than I could have ever imagined in my life.

My heart is big, full and wide open. I am constantly learning from this dynamic we have going on and they're always keeping me on my toes every single day. My kids are making me a better human.

They say necessity is the mother of invention—and nothing makes you more inventive than motherhood.

Sometimes that means fashioning a diaper out of paper towels and your older child's underpants (true story). Sometimes that means creating an innovative and life-changing weighted baby sleep sack and totally crushing it on Shark Tank. Tara Williams is the latter.

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This incredibly soft comforter from Sunday Citizen is like sleeping on a cloud

My only complaint? I've slept through my alarm twice.

When it comes to getting a good night's sleep, there are many factors that, as a mama, are hard to control. Who's going to wet the bed at 3 am, how many times a small person is going to need a sip of water, or the volume of your partner's snoring are total wildcards.

One thing you can control? Tricking out your bed to make it as downright cozy as possible. (And in these times, is there anywhere you want to be than your bed like 75% of the time?)

I've always been a down comforter sort of girl, but after a week of testing the ridiculously plush and aptly named Snug Comforter from Sunday Citizen, a brand that's run by "curators of soft, seekers of chill" who "believe in comfort over everything," it's safe to say I've been converted.

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I wasn’t sure if I wanted to have kids—so here’s what I did

We asked our three most pessimistic friends who have kids whether it's worth it or not

As told to Liz Tenety.

Around the time my husband and I were turning 30, we had a genuine conversation about whether or not we wanted kids. I was the hesitant one because I was like, "Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. Let's just hold on. Okay, let's talk about this. Because we love our life. We like traveling. Is this what we want?"

My husband said, "Let's ask our three most pessimistic, crabby friends who have kids whether or not it's worth it."

And every single one of them was like, "Oh, it's unmissable on planet earth."

So when I got pregnant, I was—and I'm not ashamed to say this and I don't think you should be—I was as connected with the baby in my belly as if it were a water bottle. I was like, I don't know you. I don't know what you are, but you can be some gas pain sometimes, but other than that, we're going to have to meet each other and suss this relationship out.

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