Name: Colleen Endick

Neighborhood: Park Slope

Occupation: Doctoral Student/Writing and Literature Instructor

Number Pregnancy: Second

How would you describe your pregnant style?

Comfortable and functional. I tried with both pregnancies to buy either non-maternity pieces that work with a bump or maternity clothes that can double as nursing clothes. And I'm all about the legs; they're probably the only part of my body that hasn't changed so I might as well show them off!

Have you had any challenges learning to dress your pregnant body this time around?

Last time I was just studying, not teaching, after my first trimester, so I was able to wear yoga pants and summer tops throughout most of the pregnancy. This time, the end of my pregnancy crosses two seasons (summer into late fall) and I'm teaching, so I need a much more diverse wardrobe -- sweaters, jeans, skirts, dresses. It's been a challenge figuring out what size I'll be in which season and what clothes will fit for which occasions.

So far, what has surprised you most during your pregnancy?

Just how tired I've been. It's like my gas tank is constantly in the red. I'm not sure if it's being a little older or having a toddler to chase around this time, but I have so much less physical energy than I did with my first.

What’s been your favorite pregnancy piece or brand to show off your bump?

It's tough to go swimsuit shopping when you're pregnant, but I love the Seraphine suit I bought. It made me feel like an old-school Hollywood siren. Their bamboo sweaters and pajamas are also so wonderfully soft and work as nursing tops. And Old Navy has good basics like tank tops and layering shirts that hold up well -- two pregnancies in and they are still working for me.

What NYC experience are you most looking forward to sharing with your baby?

Everything! Simple pleasures like picnics in Prospect Park or scooter riding at the playground, the Park Slope Halloween Parade, ferry rides to Governor's Island, taking the bus to the Pier 6 playground at Brooklyn Bridge Park and the N or D trains over the Manhattan Bridge to look down at the river, and ice cream runs at Culture or Ample Hills.

Photography by Evan Gubernick of 485 Creative.

Shot on location at Videology.

Having a newborn is challenging at the best of times, but during forced isolation and in a climate of fear and uncertainty, it can become overwhelming.

The coronavirus pandemic is setting up our communities for genuine mental health concerns. This may be especially true for new parents. When will 'normal' life return? How will I pay for diapers and baby food? Will my mom be able to help us now? What if my baby or my family get COVID-19? Unfortunately, no one knows the long-term impact or answers just yet.

Most families have built a network of social support by the time they have their first child—if they don't already have a support system, they develop one through various baby classes and groups set up for parents. The creation of the village can be instrumental to the mental health of new parents. Social distancing, the lockdown of cities, and isolation will inadvertently affect the type of support available.

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