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Breastfeeding requires you to make a few adjustments in your life, and that includes changing your personal style for easy, discreet boob access. Yes, getting dressed when you know you'll need to nurse baby is complicated. Baby can get hungry (or should we say hangry) at any point during your daily escapades, and the functionality of your clothes really matters. So knowing what to wear is important; and knowing what not to wear, even more so. Here are 5 pieces of clothes that you should keep in your closet when you know you'll need to breastfeed.

1. DON'T wear dresses that pull over your head. If you don't dress in a wrap, button down shirt, or a style that’s specifically designed for nursing like this one from Teat & Cosset, there is simply no way to get to your breast without taking off your entire dress.

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2. DON'T wear a jumpsuit unless specifically designed for breastfeeding, like this one from Loyal Hana. Overalls work well with a nursing top layered underneath. We love this one from eco maternity brand Boob Design.

3. DON'T wear a non-breastfeeding top unless you have first layer underneath. Wearing a specially designed nursing tank will give you easy access to the boob and enough coverage to nurse in whatever you’re wearing. The brand Mitera makes a great one.

4. DON'T wear a regular bra. Comfort is key when nursing, especially in the beginning. Nursing bras provide comfort, breathing room and easy snap down straps for accessibility. They really help keeping your breastfeeding sessions on the low. Try this one from Cosabella or this one from Bravado.

5. DON'T wear light, flimsy fabrics. In the early stages when milk is at peak, leaking is inevitable. Darker colors will help conceal any accidents, as will wearing nursing pads. We love these from Lansinoh and these from Bamboobies.

Bonus tip: DON'T leave the house without a scarf, wrap or nursing cover. In the event that you simply aren’t wearing the right clothes, a nursing scarf, like this one from Nuroo, or an oversize non-maternity scarf will help provide coverage in public.

There's the magazine cover photo of the new celebrity mom glowing as she looks down at the beautiful, sleeping baby in her arms—and then there's real life.

In real life, postpartum mothers are just as likely to be wearing diapers as their babies are, and bumps need months to deflate.

That's why we're so grateful for the way celebrities are ditching damaging narratives about postpartum perfection and embracing the messy authenticity of new motherhood. Thanks to these modern mamas, the rest of us are seeing our own experiences reflected in pop culture, and that lets us know we're not alone.

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