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3-ingredient baking recipes

Maybe it's just me, but every time I look on my social media feeds someone is baking desserts or breads that look incredibly delicious. According to Google Trends, as the coronavirus continues to spread, searches for 'banana bread' have skyrocketed. In the last 30 days, these searches are up 84% in the UK and 54% worldwide. Maybe it's stress baking, or maybe it's boredom, but people are in the kitchen living their best lives.

But here's the challenge: I'm trying to skip going to grocery stores and with food deliveries being spotty, I'm finding it harder to create the desserts my family loves while stuck at home. I can't seem to keep enough flour, sugar and eggs around. Enter: 3-ingredient recipes designed for mamas like me, who decide to make large dishes only to realize I have half of the ingredients.

Here are our favorite 3-ingredient desserts your entire family will love:


1. Peanut butter cereal bites

Serves: 1

Total time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Honey
  • Peanut butter
  • Honey nut cereal

Instructions:

  1. Put 1-part peanut butter and 1-part honey in a bowl.
  2. Microwave for about a minute. Stir until combined.
  3. Add 3-4 parts cereal. Stir.
  4. Scoop into bite size pieces and place on wax paper to cool.

Recipe from Tasty.

2. Chocolate fudge

Serves: 6-8

Total time: 90 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • Walnuts and pretzels, optional

Instructions:

  1. Add semi-sweet chocolate chips, sweetened condensed milk and butter (or margarine, if that's all you have on hand) in a large microwaveable bowl.
  2. Warm in microwave on medium until melted, about 3-5 minutes. Be sure to stir about every minute.
  3. Pour fudge mixture into a well-greased 8 x 8 inch glass baking dish. Refrigerate until set.
Recipe from Dear Crissy.

3. Shortbread cookies

Serves: 16

Total time: 40 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • Confectioners' sugar, optional

Instructions:

  • Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Gradually beat in flour. Press dough into an ungreased 9-in. square baking pan. Prick with a fork.
  • Bake until light brown, 30-35 minutes. Cut into squares while warm. Cool completely on a wire rack. If desired, dust with confectioners sugar.
Recipe from Taste of Home.

4. Healthy banana oatmeal breakfast bars

Serves: 1 bar

Total time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 6 to 7 mashed bananas
  • 1 cup of peanut butter
  • 4 cups of old fashioned rolled oats

Instructions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350F. Line an 8 x 8 inch pan with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine your mashed banana, peanut butter, and old fashioned (rolled) oats and mix until a thick dough remains. If the batter is too thin, add some extra oats. If using chocolate chips, fold them in, using a rubber spatula.
  3. Pour the batter in the lined pan and spread out on an even layer. Top with some extra chocolate chips and bake for 12-15 minutes, or until golden brown on top and a skewer comes out clean.
  4. Remove from the oven and allow the breakfast bars to sit in the pan for 10 minutes, or until loose enough to transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Recipe from a Big Mans World.

5. Peanut butter cups

Serves: 6

Total time: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons powdered sugar, sifted
  • ½ cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1 cup chocolate, melted

Instructions:

  1. Prepare a cupcake tin with 6 liners.
  2. Stir peanut butter and powdered sugar together until smooth.
  3. Spread 1 to 2 tbsp of chocolate in the bottom of each cupcake liner.
  4. Dollop 1 to 2 tsp of the peanut butter mixture on top of the chocolate.
  5. Cover each dollop of peanut butter with more chocolate and smooth out the top.
  6. Refrigerate for 1 hour or until chocolate has hardened.
  7. Remove peanut butter cups from the liners.

Recipe from Tasty.

6. Sugar cookies

Serves: 12

Total time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 stick unsalted butter, plus 2 tbsp. salted butter
  • 1/3 cups sugar
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • Sprinkles, optional

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Use an electric mixer to cream the sugar and butter, whipping the two until the butter is almost white and the mixture is light and fluffy, almost like a slightly gritty frosting, then stir in flour.
  3. Form the cookies into 1-inch balls, placing them about two inches apart on a baking sheet. If using sprinkles, flatten cookies into a disc shape and top with sprinkles.
  4. Bake for 15 to 17 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies are lightly golden.

Recipe from Delish.

7. Cake mix cobbler

Serves: 8

Total time: 55 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans peaches in light syrup
  • 1 box yellow cake mix
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Pour peaches into a baking dish. Sprinkle cake mix on top and pour melted butter all over.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven until golden brown, about 50 minutes.

Recipe from All Recipes.

When I was expecting my first child, I wanted to know everything that could possibly be in store for his first year.

I quizzed my own mom and the friends who ventured into motherhood before I did. I absorbed parenting books and articles like a sponge. I signed up for classes on childbirth, breastfeeding and even baby-led weaning. My philosophy? The more I knew, the better.

Yet, despite my best efforts, I didn't know it all. Not by a long shot. Instead, my firstborn, my husband and I had to figure it out together—day by day, challenge by challenge, triumph by triumph.

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The funny thing is that although I wanted to know it all, the surprises—those moments that were unique to us—were what made that first year so beautiful.

Of course, my research provided a helpful outline as I graduated from never having changed a diaper to conquering the newborn haze, my return to work, the milestones and the challenges. But while I did need much of that tactical knowledge, I also learned the value of following my baby's lead and trusting my gut.

I realized the importance of advice from fellow mamas, too. I vividly remember a conversation with a friend who had her first child shortly before I welcomed mine. My friend, who had already returned to work after maternity leave, encouraged me to be patient when introducing a bottle and to help my son get comfortable with taking that bottle from someone else.

Yes, from a logistical standpoint, that's great advice for any working mama. But I also took an incredibly important point from this conversation: This was less about the act of bottle-feeding itself, and more about what it represented for my peace of mind when I was away from my son.

This fellow mama encouraged me to honor my emotions and give myself permission to do what was best for my family—and that really set the tone for my whole approach to parenting. Because honestly, that was just the first of many big transitions during that first year, and each of them came with their own set of mixed emotions.

I felt proud and also strangely nostalgic as my baby seamlessly graduated to a sippy bottle.

I felt my baby's teething pain along with him and also felt confident that we could get through it with the right tools.

I felt relieved as my baby learned to self-soothe by finding his own pacifier and also sad to realize how quickly he was becoming his own person.



As I look back on everything now, some four years and two more kids later, I can't remember the exact day my son crawled, the project I tackled on my first day back at work, or even what his first word was. (It's written somewhere in a baby book!)

But I do remember how I felt with each milestone: the joy, the overwhelming love, the anxiety, the exhaustion and the sense of wonder. That truly was the greatest gift of the first year… and nothing could have prepared me for all those feelings.

This article was sponsored by Dr. Brown's. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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As a mom of three, I frequently get a question from moms and dads of two children: “Ok, so the jump to three...how bad is it?"

Personally, I found the transition to having even one kid to be the most jarring. Who is this little person who cries nonstop (mine had colic) and has no regard for when I feel like sitting/eating/resting/sleeping?

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