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8 easy + tasty dinner recipes you can make out of canned goods

If all you have in your pantry is canned foods, we have you covered.

dinner recipes from canned goods

Canned goods get a bad reputation—but did you know eating canned foods can actually encourage you to eat more fruit and vegetables since they're so cost-effective for families? And now more than ever mamas are finding ways to cut back on food spending (and grocery shopping) while providing delicious meals for their family.

This entire process of social distancing and quarantine is hard, but we're here to help you rediscover the benefits and convenience of canned goods, mama.

Here are eight tasty recipes your entire family will love:

1. Tuna noodle casserole

Campbells

Serves: 4

Total time: 45 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp crushed garlic
  • 1 cup chopped mushrooms (or from the can)
  • 2 tbsp whole-wheat flour, plus more as needed
  • 1 cup mushroom broth
  • 3/4 cups lactose-free milk, such as Lactaid, plus more as needed
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 6- 8 oz egg noodles, cooked
  • 1 5 oz can tuna in water
  • 1/2 cup canned peas
  • 1/2 cup shredded extra-sharp Cheddar
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tbsp breadcrumbs

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Heat the olive oil in large frying pan over medium-low heat. Add the garlic and mushrooms. Sauté for 5 minutes. Add the flour and stir until well mixed. Add the broth and 1/2 cup of the milk and whisk continuously until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. Put the cooked noodles, tuna, peas, cheese, Worcestershire sauce, remaining milk and mushroom sauce in a casserole dish. Mix well. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs on top and bake uncovered in the oven for 20-30 minutes. Season with more salt and pepper, to taste.

Recipe from TheDailyMeal.

2. Marinated beans with celery and ricotta salata

Serves: 8

Total time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 4 15 oz cans cannellini (white kidney) beans, navy beans, and/or black-eyed peas, rinsed
  • 4 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • 2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp coarsely chopped thyme, plus more for serving
  • Kosher salt
  • 4 oz ricotta salata (salted dry ricotta), crumbled
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions:

  1. Toss beans, celery, oil, vinegar and 1 tbsp. thyme in a large bowl to combine. Season generously with salt.
  2. Just before serving, transfer beans to a shallow bowl and top with ricotta salata, pepper, and more thyme.
Recipe from Bonappetit.

3. White bean + spring vegetable stew

Serves: 8

Total time: 35 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb dried large white beans (such as lima or gigante), soaked overnight, drained
  • 1 onion, trimmed, peeled, halved through core
  • 3 ribs celery, trimmed, halved
  • 1 oz dried shiitake mushrooms (about 10 large caps)
  • 8 sprigs parsley, plus ¾ cup parsley leaves with tender stems
  • 1 head of garlic, halved, plus 1 garlic clove, finely grated
  • 1 tbsp plus 1 tsp. kosher salt, plus more
  • 3/4 cup plus 3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling, divided
  • 3/4 cup mint leaves
  • 1 bunch radishes
  • 1 bunch medium-size asparagus (about 1 lb.)
  • 1 10 oz bag frozen peas, thawed
  • 8 thick slices country or sourdough bread
  • 1 4 inch piece fresh horseradish root, peeled
  • 1 lemon, cut into 8 wedges

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 300°. Combine beans, onion, celery, mushrooms, parsley sprigs, halved head of garlic, 1 tbsp. salt, 3 tbsp. oil, and 2 quarts of water in a large Dutch oven. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, cover, and transfer to the oven. Bake until beans are fully cooked, tender, and creamy through and through but as intact as humanly possible, about 1 hour, depending on the type, brand, and age of beans; start checking every 10 minutes after the first 45 minutes. (When checking beans for doneness, stir gently and taste at least 3 beans—it isn't finished until they're all tender!)
  2. Using tongs, fish out aromatics and discard. Season with salt.
  3. Under-seasoned beans are barely worth eating. Let sit on the stovetop, uncovered, until ready to serve.
  4. While beans are cooking, make your pistou and prep the vegetables and garnishes. Using your sharpest knife, finely chop mint and ¾ cup parsley leaves. (A dull knife will just mash your herbs and cause them to turn dark around the edges.) Transfer to a small bowl. Add 3/4 cup oil, grated garlic, and 1 tsp. salt and stir to combine; set pistou aside.
  5. Trim and wash radishes, then slice as thinly as possible into coins. Transfer radishes to a small bowl, cover with cold water, and chill until ready to use.
  6. Wash asparagus and trim woody stems by bending each spear near the cut end until you find the place where it wants to break naturally. Cut off tips, then cut each tip in half lengthwise. Slice now-tipless stalks crosswise into thin coins. Toss asparagus coins and tips and peas in a medium bowl; set aside.
  7. When you're almost ready to serve the stew, return beans to a gentle simmer over medium heat, taking care not to stir too much—you don't want to bust up those beans.
  8. Generously drizzle oil into a large cast-iron skillet and heat over medium until shimmering. Working in two batches, fry bread slices until golden brown on both sides, about 2 minutes per side. Season with salt and transfer to a plate.
  9. When beans are simmering, add reserved asparagus and peas and cook, stirring gently, until asparagus coins are barely cooked but still bright green and crunchy, about 2 minutes.
  10. Drain reserved radishes. Place horseradish root on a plate with a microplane. Bring Dutch oven full of stew directly to the table. Serve with fried bread, pistou, radishes, lemon wedges, and horseradish alongside.

Recipe from Bonappetit.

4. Spam + pineapple skewers

Spam

Serves: 6

Total time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

For the pineapple glaze:

  • 1 cup pineapple preserves
  • 2 tbspwhite wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste

For the skewers:

  • 1 pineapple, peeled and cored, cut into 1 1/2 inch chunks
  • 1 12 oz can of Spam, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks
  • 1 red onion, cut into 1 1/2 inch chunks
  • Olive oil, for brushing
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste
  • Bamboo skewers, soaked in water for 30 minutes

Instructions:

For the pineapple glaze:

  1. To make the glaze, add all of the ingredients to a saucepan on medium until the mixture is warm; stirring occasionally.

For the skewers:

  1. Preheat your grill to medium heat.
  2. Add chunks of pineapple, Spam, and red onion to skewers, alternating until you get to the top of the skewer. Brush the finished skewers with olive oil, salt and pepper.
  3. Grill the skewers for 10 minutes, brushing with pineapple glaze, making sure to turn occasionally so all sides can get grill marks.
Recipe from TheDailyMeal.

5. Chickpea curry with rice


Serves: 6

Total time: 35 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups basmati rice
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp curry powder
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 cup vegetable stock
  • 2 15 oz cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 13.5 oz can coconut milk
  • 1 to 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 to 2 tbsp sriracha sauce
  • Naan bread, for serving
  • Chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Cook the basmati rice according to the package instructions.
  2. Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add the onions, season with salt and pepper and cook until the onions are dark brown and caramelized, about 10 minutes. Stir in the curry powder and garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Pour in the vegetable stock and stir to scrape up all the brown bits in the pan. Add the chickpeas, coconut milk, honey and a squirt of sriracha. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning.
  3. Warm the naan in the microwave. Serve the curry over the rice with the warmed naan. Garnish with the cilantro.

Recipe from FoodNetwork.

6. Quick + easy vegetable pot pie


Serves: 6

Total time: 1 hour

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 3 cups frozen mixed vegetables, thawed
  • 1 can (15 ounces) lentils, drained
  • 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup vegetable or chicken broth
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp quatre epices (French four spice)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 sheet refrigerated pie crust
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°. In a large skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Add vegetables and lentils; cook and stir until heated through, 3-5 minutes. Stir in flour until blended; gradually whisk in broth. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly; cook and stir until thickened, 1-2 minutes. Stir in mustard, French four spice and salt.
  2. Transfer to a greased 9 inch pie plate. Place pie crust over filling. Trim and cut slits on top. Brush with oil; sprinkle with parmesan.
  3. Bake until golden brown, 30-35 minutes. Cool 5 minutes before serving.
Recipe from TasteofHome.

7. Cream of turkey + wild rice soup


Serves: 6

Total time: 35 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 can sliced mushrooms, drained
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 3 cups water
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 package long grain and wild rice mix
  • 2 cups diced cooked turkey
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • Minced fresh parsley

Instructions:

  1. In a large saucepan, saute onion and mushrooms in butter until onion is tender. Add water, broth and rice mix with seasoning; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer for 20-25 minutes or until rice is tender.
  2. Stir in turkey and cream and heat through. Sprinkle with parsley.

Recipe from TasteofHome.

8. Penne with spicy vodka tomato cream sauce


Serves: 8

Total time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound uncooked penne pasta
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 (28 ounce) can crushed tomatoes
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons vodka
  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 links sweet Italian sausage

Instructions:

  1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until al dente; drain.
  2. In large skillet, heat oil over moderate heat. Remove casing from sausage and add to skillet. Cook, breaking up the meat, until brown. Add garlic and red pepper and cook, stirring until garlic is golden brown.
  3. Add tomatoes and salt; bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Add vodka and cream and bring to boil. Reduce heat to low and add pasta, toss for 1 minute. Stir in fresh parsley and serve!
Recipe from AllRecipes.
From Your Site Articles

This is how we’re defining success this school year

Hint: It's not related to grades.

In the ever-moving lives of parents and children, opportunities to slow down and reflect on priorities can be hard to come by. But a new school year scheduled to begin in the midst of a global pandemic offers the chance to reflect on how we should all think about measures of success. For both parents and kids, that may mean putting a fresh emphasis on optimism, creativity and curiosity.

Throughout recent decades, "school success" became entangled with "academic achievement," with cases of anxiety among school children dramatically increasing in the past few generations. Then, almost overnight, the American school system was turned on its head in the spring of 2020. As we look ahead to a new school year that will look like no year past, more is being asked of teachers, students and parents, such as acclimating to distance learning, collaborating with peers from afar and aiming to maintain consistency with schooling amidst general instability due to COVID.

Despite the inherent challenges, there is also an overdue opportunity to redefine success during the school year by finding fresh ways to keep students and their parents involved in the learning process.

"I always encourage my son to try at least one difficult thing every school year," says Arushi Garg, parenting blogger and mom of a 4-year-old. "This challenges him but also allows me to remind him to be optimistic! Lots of things in life are hard, and it's important we learn to be positive during difficult times. Fostering a sense of optimism allows kids to push beyond what they thought possible, like biking without training wheels or reading above their grade level."

Here are a few mantras to keep in mind this school year:

Quality learning matters more than quantifying learning

After focusing on standardized measures of academic success for so long, the learning environment this next school year may involve more independent, remote learning. Some parents are considering this an exciting opportunity for their children to assume a bigger role in what they are learning—and parents are also getting on board by supporting their children's education with engaging, positive learning materials like Highlights Magazine.

As a working mom, Garg also appreciates that Highlights Magazine can help engage her son while she's also working. She says, "He sits next to me and solves puzzles in the magazine or practices his writing from the workbook."

Keep an open mind as "school" looks different

Whether children are of preschool age or in the midst of high school, "going to school" is bound to look different this year. Naturally, this may require some adjustment as kids become accustomed to new guidelines. Although many parents may wish to shelter our kids from challenges, others believe optimism can be fostered through adversity when everyone is committed to adapting to new experiences.

"Honestly, I am yet to figure out when I will be comfortable sending [my son] back [to school]," says Garg. In the meantime, she's helping her son remain connected with friends who also read Highlights Magazine by encouraging the kids to talk about what they are learning on video calls.

Follow children's cues about what interests them

For Garg, her biggest hope for this school year is that her son will create "success" for himself by embracing new learning possibilities with positivity.

"Encouraging my son to try new things has given him a chance to prove that he can do anything," she says. "He takes his previous success as an example now and feels he can fail multiple times before he succeeds."

There's no denying that this school year will be far from the norm. But, perhaps, we can create a new, better way of defining our children's success in school because of it.

This article was sponsored by Highlights. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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