Personal style is not always at the forefront of your mind during a pregnancy. There are endless factors to consider like diet, exercise, doctor appointments, nursery prep, etc. but taking care of yourself stylistically is important too. Feeling beautiful and confident to ensure both mama and baby are absorbing all of the good vibes and are happy is essential. That said, here are our top 3 “what not to do” fashion faux pas to help you troubleshoot the second trimester.

DON’T BREAK THE BANK: We get it, the bump has finally popped and you’re excited to build a true maternity wardrobe. That said, it’s important to build a maternity capsule that is flexible, expands with your growing bump and beyond. Keep it tight and edited. Find pieces that will work for now and later, and choose only a couple of pieces wisely (like maternity denim) that you accept will be short-lived in your wardrobe.

PAY ATTENTION: In contrast to above, sometimes women don’t build their maternity capsule at all and wind up in a maternity fashion rut on repeat (like wearing leggings daily!). That said, create a budget that you are willing to spend on your maternity capsule and confidently invest in it. While not every item will last the test of time (that is OK!), it’s vital to be your best self through this magical experience. Embrace it, empower yourself in this new shape and don’t approach getting dressed as a “temporarily on hold” phenomenon.

BUSTING OUT: Your bump isn’t quite large yet, but it’s also not not-existent either. While you were able to squeeze into much of your pre-pregnancy wardrobe during the first trimester, you’re probably starting to bust out of those options. So stop wearing them immediately. If you’re tugging away at your top to cover your bump or using a rubber band to keep you denim shut, it’s time to get shopping. Choose items that fit your curvier shape the same way you choose clothing when not-pregnant to fit your shape.

Photo by DIY Maternity.

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