Menu
Fitness Focus: Body Conceptions

One thing you miss when you’re pregnant is the dancing. You know, the out-all-night-in-heels, a few-too-many-drinks, sweaty-bodies-on-the-dancefloor dancing. The kind of dancing that makes you forget about everything else in the world except the thump of the music. But we’ve got good news, pregnant girl: you don’t have to give it up (ok, except maybe the all night and heels and drinking part).

Listen closely: Body Conceptions. Founded by fitness guru and former dancer Mahri Relin, Body Conceptions (or for those in the know, BoCo) is an exhilarating workout set to an amazing playlist. Not only can you get your groove on, but you can also create long and lean muscles, and build stamina and functional strength….which is a whole lot more than I ever gained from those late nights of rocking out pre-pregnancy. And since instructors are either pre- and postnatal certified (or on their way to certification), BoCo has become a hot ticket for pregnant gals all over the city who are looking for a fun, challenging and totally safe alternative to those late nights on the town.

Below, Relin fills us in on how she fuses dance and fitness for a can’t-miss class for pregnant gals, new moms and anyone looking for a generally good time.

What happens in a typical Body Conceptions class?

A signature BoCo class intertwines dance sections consisting of simple, high energy dancing and jumping movements with sculpting exercises that focus on the arms, thighs, abs, and seat. While each part of the body has its own dedicated section of class, many exercises integrate several muscles at once and require recruitment of the core. The exercises can range from very small, exhaustive movements (like pulsing up and down repeatedly in a low lunge) to bigger dynamic movements (like throwing in a few mountain climbers or punching the arms with weights), all set to music. There is also a strong emphasis on stretching, both in the middle and end of class.

Once we have methodically targeted all parts of the body, we turn off the lights and dance with abandon. I don’t care about form at this point. This is the moment to feel sexy and strong! We then stretch and breath together to end the class.

Give us the 411 on the studio and classes – where are you located and what’s the vibe?

We offer most of our classes out of Stepping Out Studios at 37 West 26th Street on the 9th floor. We have also started offering some classes in Jersey City and will be collaborating with FiTiST to offer classes in the Hamptons this summer. (Contact us for more information on our classes outside of the city!)

I have always believed very strongly in creating an environment that is welcoming and supportive for everyone. To me, fitness classes should never make anyone feel excluded. This does not mean that the classes are easy or simplistic by any means! We want to encourage everyone to have a blast and to push themselves beyond their limits but in a place without any judgment or competition. Our trainers are hard-core, but they are also some of the warmest and most helpful people you’ll meet.

Which classes are ideal for pregnancy?

We have a great pre- and postnatal private training program, but we don’t currently offer public classes specifically for pregnancy. I recommend that someone who is very nervous about modifying for pregnancy should consider trying a private session with us before going to our group classes. For those who are a little more comfortable, our class can be a great option. Make sure to come early to discuss modifications with your instructor, and don’t do anything in the class that feels uncomfortable. The instructor will also likely make choices that keep you in mind.

Although this isn’t prenatal, per se, why are so many pregnant women drawn to this workout?

Pregnant women love our workout because they find it challenging, fun and effective. This workout keeps them flexible and strong. Many of them go through their pregnancies without any aches and pains because of the muscles we target, and they also feel happier and more energized after their sessions. It also helps them continue strengthening their abs so that they feel stronger during labor and recover more quickly after the pregnancy.

How are your trainers tuned into pregnancy? Postnatal?

All of our trainers are either certified pre- and postnatal exercise specialists or are in the process of obtaining their certifications. In addition, we run a special BoCo pre- and postnatal training program focused on adapting the BoCo method to pregnancy, and I work very closely with my trainers when they have pregnant clients. We are not doctors of course, but we encourage our clients to keep an open dialogue with us about any issues that arise, and we will communicate with their doctors if they request it.

After a client has a baby, it’s important that she waits for her doctor to clear her to exercise. There are also issues to consider that are unique to post-pregnancy. We will not throw our clients back into classes as if they were never pregnant. We are very aware of issues like diastasis recti and the continued presence of relaxin in the body, among other things. Women need time to re-condition after they have a baby!

What adjustments do you make to the concept for pregnancy?

This is a little complicated to answer because every pregnant woman is different and because things change from trimester to trimester. I tell every pregnant client that they are in charge of our workouts and that they need to tell me the minute something feels uncomfortable. These thresholds may be very different from person to person. Also, clients who have been working with me for a long time tend to train at a completely different level because they can tolerate greater intensity, and they're not asking their body to do anything that feels new or crazy (which is never a good idea during pregnancy!).

Regardless of the person I'm training, there are still a few universal adjustments I tend to make:

-Some clients continue to do a little cardio, which consists of lots of jumping. By mid-second trimester, we usually end the jumping and choose different methods of raising the heart rate. We pay attention to the rate of exertion (which can be different for different women). On a scale of 1-10, we never take it beyond 8.

-We never put our women on their stomachs

-We don't do extra deep lunging that can stress the lower pelvic ligaments and tendons

-We don't do any extreme twists

-We don't ask women to lie directly on their back for extended periods of time after 19 weeks. (We've worked around this using rollers - very fun discovery for us!)

What about postnatal?

Postnatal training is cognizant of the labor recovery process and how deconditioned the client may have become during or after pregnancy. Most women have trouble feeling their abdominal muscles post-pregnancy, and this can be especially true after a C-section. It's important for all postnatal women to rebuild their abdominals from the inside out - starting with the deep transverse and pelvic floor muscles. We also look out for abdominal splits and adjust the abdominal exercises accordingly. Women still have relaxin present in their bodies for several months post-pregnancy, so it's important to keep in mind that their joints can still be a bit loose and more vulnerable to injury. We might not throw them right back into complex cardio in the beginning, and we might also try to use more stable body positions through the session. As with pregnancy, it's important to treat each postnatal woman as an individual and let her body guide the process. It's also important to reassure her that her commitment to exercise is so great. She will "bounce back" for sure. But she should also be patient with herself!

What are some of the Body Conceptions exercises that benefit a pregnant woman in particular? What about a postnatal woman?

We have a pretty big roster of exercises, so it's a little hard to be too specific here. For the most part, our pregnant women really benefit from the thigh work, which gives them lots of leg strength and joint stability. Our abdominal work adapted for pregnancy has been key for getting women through labor and regaining strength post-pregnancy because it focuses so much on the pelvic floor and deep transverse "corset" ab muscles. Our glute work is also essential to supporting the body during pregnancy and taking pressure off the quads and lower back.

Any advice you’d give a pregnant gal who wants to keep up with her regular exercise routine?

Many women who have been exercising regularly can keep their exercise routines through their first trimester at least. The exception is if they are in danger of getting hit in the stomach, falling, laying or putting pressure on their stomach, twisting, or shifting their weight or direction too suddenly. The other danger is if they're engaged in something that makes them stop paying attention to their body signals. Examples might include competitive sports, teaching fitness, and stage performance. In these instances, you purposely ignore any sign of pain or discomfort in order to achieve your goal of performing at your very best. You can often miss signs of danger that are very important.

I would encourage any active woman who becomes pregnant to contact her trainer or fitness studio and ask lots of questions. Find out how knowledgeable they are about pregnancy and how much they can guide you. Even if it's too expensive to get a trainer regularly, consider having one or two seasons with a pregnancy/fitness expert to walk you through the things you should or shouldn't do through the pregnancy. See if you can meet your instructors early before class to walk through possible modifications. (We do that regularly!)

Regardless, I am a broken record when it comes to pregnancy and exercise. Go for it, but put your body front and center. You will know when something feels wrong, so always pay attention to those signals. Try not to put your body through new or extreme exercise, but lots of what you're doing already can continue. And in terms of exertion, you can definitely sweat, but keep the intensity at a level where you can still talk and breath well.

Can you give us one Body Conceptions-style “do-at-home” exercise that pregnant women can try during pregnancy when they can’t get out to a class?

One of my favorite thigh exercises during pregnancy is called “Wide Second.”

-You stand with your feet turned out and placed slightly wider than the hips.

-Bend both knees to about 90-degree angles, keeping the knees aligned directly over the feet (not rolling forward).

- Adjust your position so that your feet are not too wide apart and hard to control or so close together that your knees are bending past your toes.

-Make sure your upper body is straight up and down (not tilted forward), and your chest is lifted with the shoulders relaxed.

-I always recommend doing our exercises to music. Try using something with a medium tempo.

-Start with your hands on your hips. Staying deep and low in your Wide Second bend*, pulse your body slightly up and down 30x to the beat of the music.

-Stay deep in your lower body position*, and reach your arms wide out to each side of your body.

-Keeping your legs still, alternate reaching your arms out to each side 20x to the music.

-Reach long through the arms. (In fact, you can even let your ribcage pull out to each side as you reach.)

-Keep your lower abs engaged.

-Put your hands back on your hips.

-Staying in your Wide Second position*, pulse both knees back at the same time 30x. These are very tiny movements that should make you feel the back of your upper thighs and glutes engaging.

-Repeat 1-3 as needed.

*If you need to straighten your knees in the middle of this exercise at any time, please do. Take one or two breaths, and return to your Wide Second position. If you have trouble keeping your balance during this exercise, feel free to keep at least one hand on a chair or tabletop in front of you.

Photography by Matt Simpkins Photography.

Why do all of my good parenting or baby-focused inventions come after they've already been invented by someone else? Sigh.

Like the Puj hug hooded baby towel, aka the handiest, softest cotton towel ever created.

Safely removing a wet, slippery baby from the bath can be totally nerve-wracking, and trying to hold onto a towel at the same time without soaking it in the process seems to require an extra arm altogether. It's no wonder so much water ends up on the floor, the countertops, or you(!) after bathing your little one. Their splashing and kicking in the water is beyond adorable, of course, but the clean up after? Not as much.

It sounds simple: Wash your child, sing them a song or two, let them play with some toys, then take them out, place a towel around them, and dry them off. Should be easy, peasy, lemon squeezy, right?

But it hasn't been. It's been more—as one of my favorite memes says—difficult, difficult, lemon difficult. Because until this towel hit the bathtime scene, there was no easy-peasy way to pick up your squirming wet baby without drenching yourself and/or everything around you.

Plus, there is nothing cuter than a baby in a plush hooded towel, right? Well, except when it's paired with a dry, mess-free floor, maybe.

Check out our favorites to make bathtime so much easier:

Keep reading Show less
Shop

When expecting a baby, there is a lot you can test-run in advance: Take that stroller around the block. Go for a spin with the car seat secured in place. Learn how to use the baby carrier with help from a doll. But breastfeeding? It's not exactly possible to practice before baby's arrival.

The absence of a trial makes it all the more important to prepare in other ways for breastfeeding success—and it can be as simple as adding a few of our lactation aiding favorites to your registry.

MilkBliss chocolate chip soft baked lactation cookies

MilkBliss lactation cookies

Studies have shown the top reason women stop breastfeeding within the first year is because they are concerned about their milk supply being enough to nourish baby. Consider MilkBliss Lactation Cookies to be your secret weapon. Not only are they wholesome and delicious, but they were formulated specifically for breastfeeding moms based on the science of galactagogues—also known as milk boosters. They also come in peanut butter and wild blueberry flavors.

$23

Evereden multi-purpose healing balm

Evereden multipurpose healing balm

Also up there on the list of reasons women stop breastfeeding: the toll the early days can take on nipples. Made from just five ingredients, this all natural healing balm is ideal for soothing chafed nipples, making for a much more comfortable experience for mama as her body adjusts to the needs of a breastfeeding baby.

$20

Lansinoh milk storage bags

Lansinoh milk storage bags

For a breastfeeding mama, there are few things more precious and valuable than the milk she worked so hard to pump—and it's the stuff of nightmares to imagine it spilling out in the fridge. With these double-sealed milk storage bags, you can be assured your breastmilk is safe and sound until baby needs it.

$12.50

Belly Bandit bandita nursing bra

Belly Bandit bandita nursing bra

Nursing a baby is a 24/7 job, which calls for some wardrobe modifications. Because Belly Bandit specializes in making things more comfortable for the postpartum mama, they've truly thought of every detail—from the breathable fabric to the clips that can be easily opened with one hand.

$47

boob-ease soothing therapy pillows

Boob Ease soothing therapy pillows

For nursing moms, duct can quickly become a four-letter word when you suspect it's getting clogged. By keeping these soothing breast pillows in your breastfeeding arsenal, you can immediately go on the defense against plugged milk ducts by heating the pads in the microwave or cooling them in the freezer.

$25

Belly Bandit perfect nursing tee

Belly Bandit perfect nursing tee

A unfortunate reality of nursing is that it can really seem to limit the wardrobe options when you have to think about providing easy, discrete access. But by adding functional basics to your closet, you can feel confident and prepared for breastfeeding on the go.

$59

Bebe au Lait premium cotton nursing cover

Bebe au Lait cotton nursing cover

Nursing in public isn't every mama's cup of tea. But babies can't always wait until you've found a private place to get down to business if that's your preference. That's where a nursing cover comes in handy. This one is made from premium cotton and features a patented neckline that allows for airflow and eye contact even while you're covered.

$36

Lactation Lab basic breastmilk testing kit

Lactation Lab breastmilk testing kit

Curious to learn more about the liquid gold you're making, mama? The testing kit from Lactation Labs analyzes your breast milk for basic nutritional content like calories and protein, as well as vitamins, fatty acids and environmental toxins to help boost your breastfeeding confidence.

$99

We independently select and share the products we love—and may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this

Shop

Our list of 100 baby names that should be on everyone's list this year includes more choices than in the past of names that are obscure and surprising. That's because there are so many more unusual baby names coming into widespread use and baby namers have become a lot more adventurous.

Expectant parents do not need to be told to move beyond Jennifer and Jason. Their thinking about names has evolved to the point that the most useful thing we can do is offer a large menu of intriguing choices.

Here are our picks for the 100 best surprising + unusual baby names now.


Keep reading Show less
Learn + Play