Liar, Liar

There were various walks to various restaurants on my way to meet various friends or work associates when I remember thinking, “What lie am I going to come up with this time?” Not only had pregnancy made me exhausted in my first trimester, suddenly it was turning me into a liar. My friends would know something was up if I wouldn’t be joining them for a cocktail...or a few. There are only so many excuses a girl can come up with before bursting “I’m pregnant!” So for those evenings you find yourself on that same walk, I grant you five lies to make all your own.

Tell them you’re doing a juice cleanse:

It’s all the rage these days, and they’re probably doing one next week. Just make sure you eat before you meet them and know which juice company you’re fake representing.

Tell them you’re on antibiotics:

Just please make sure to come up with why. A dear friend of mine started thinking that I had an STD because I couldn’t give her a clear answer as to why I was taking meds. Can we say “ew”?

Tell them you’re cutting back on calories:

When they ask you why? Lie again: “I wanna be skinnier, duh.”

Tell them you’re trying to get pregnant:

Affirm them with something like: “Don’t be an idiot. I’d totally tell you if I was!”

Tell them you have to be on point for something work-related tomorrow:

They’ll respond with the usual: “God, you’re such a workaholic.”

And when those don't work? Invite them over for a "cocktail" and make yourself this delicious N/A recipe provided by Executive Chef & Managing Partner of Center Bar, Michael Lomonaco:

Raspberry Cooler

1 oz raspberry puree

½ of agave nectar

top with club soda

orange twist

Glass: Highball

Method- combine the raspberry puree and the agave nectar in a highball. Stir and then fill up the glass with ice, top with club soda. Stir and then fill up the glass with ice, top with club soda

Just don't forget to add booze to your friends glass.

Cheers.

Having a newborn is challenging at the best of times, but during forced isolation and in a climate of fear and uncertainty, it can become overwhelming.

The coronavirus pandemic is setting up our communities for genuine mental health concerns. This may be especially true for new parents. When will 'normal' life return? How will I pay for diapers and baby food? Will my mom be able to help us now? What if my baby or my family get COVID-19? Unfortunately, no one knows the long-term impact or answers just yet.

Most families have built a network of social support by the time they have their first child—if they don't already have a support system, they develop one through various baby classes and groups set up for parents. The creation of the village can be instrumental to the mental health of new parents. Social distancing, the lockdown of cities, and isolation will inadvertently affect the type of support available.

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