We’ve followed blogger Liz Stanley of Say Yes to Hoboken for awhile now. Her DIYs, delicious recipes and genius under-$50 finds always keep us coming back for more. But it was the day that she started opening up about her issues with fertility in getting pregnant the second time around that we truly felt we knew the person behind the blog. We admired her perseverance and honesty to herself and readers. So when she finally shared “The Best News Ever,” we couldn’t help but smile at each bump post that followed -- not only because we knew the long road it took to get her to where she is now, but also because she looks completely bump enviable in each one.

Here she tells us about her style during pregnancy and all the joy that second baby is about to experience upon arrival.

What have been your favorite maternity wardrobe finds? Loose and baggy has been the style lately, but I was surprised to find that I have been really drawn to more fitted stuff during this pregnancy. I think with my expanding figure, wearing loose and baggy stuff just makes me feel bigger! My favorite things are tube skirts, tube dresses and leggings. ASOS Maternity has been my go-to spot for some really stylish maternity wear.

How does the San Francisco climate affect your wardrobe decisions? Certainly, it's all about layers here. This actually works well with maternity style. Leggings under a tube skirt with a sweater and vest. Or a trench coat (I just wear my non-maternity one and only button the top button) with maternity jeans and Bensimons. It's nice to have a little chill since hot flashes are frequent for me!

Have you noticed a difference being pregnant on the west coast vs. east? I remember being pregnant in NYC and passing out in the subway from the heat. Heat was a huge issue during my last pregnancy that I don’t have to worry about here, so it's been really nice!

Have you had time to nest?

Oh, I've been hugely nesting lately. We're pretty much starting from scratch when it comes to baby gear. This journey to have a second child has been a really long one (I talk about our struggle with secondary infertility on the blog here), so I'm beyond ready, excited and prepared for this baby. I've had her clothes bought, washed and folded on the shelf for weeks now! It's been amazing. We're beyond excited, and I've really enjoyed nesting and setting things up in a new space.

How have you explained your bump to your first child? Henry's almost six years old, so he's been clued into the situation since pretty much day one. It's really fun since he's at an age where he can understand and process a lot more than a younger child. He asks lots of questions about how the baby comes out and when and what exactly will happen. It's really fun to talk with him about it, and he's super-excited to be a big brother!

What are you most looking forward to? I know most people wait nine months for a baby, but I feel like we've been waiting four years and nine months. It's been a long process of dealing with secondary infertility. The most difficult part was wanting so badly to give our son a sibling, so more than anything, I can't wait to see our boy as a big brother to this lucky little miracle of a girl.

Photography by Ashley Thalman courtesy of Say Yes to Hoboken

Having a newborn is challenging at the best of times, but during forced isolation and in a climate of fear and uncertainty, it can become overwhelming.

The coronavirus pandemic is setting up our communities for genuine mental health concerns. This may be especially true for new parents. When will 'normal' life return? How will I pay for diapers and baby food? Will my mom be able to help us now? What if my baby or my family get COVID-19? Unfortunately, no one knows the long-term impact or answers just yet.

Most families have built a network of social support by the time they have their first child—if they don't already have a support system, they develop one through various baby classes and groups set up for parents. The creation of the village can be instrumental to the mental health of new parents. Social distancing, the lockdown of cities, and isolation will inadvertently affect the type of support available.

Keep reading Show less
Our Partners