For #MotherlyStories |

Today I had a good mom day.


You know, the type of day where we survived grocery shopping without any meltdowns, the kids ate fruits and veggies with every meal, and we actually finished a cute craft that I found on Pinterest. My kids had clean clothes and styled hair all day, everyone played together nicely, and my toddler didn't have any potty accidents. It was the type of day where at the end, I felt like I was really nailing this mom thing.

Unfortunately, not every day goes that well. No matter what someone's life looks like from the outside, nobody has good mom days every day. Some days (okay, most), I count down the minutes until my husband comes home from work. I look at the clock at 2 and wonder how I'm going to make it three more hours with my adorable, destructive toddlers. Some days my kids have yogurt on their faces from breakfast until bedtime, simply because I keep forgetting to wipe it because I'm doing so many other things around the house. Some days I lose my cool and lock myself in the bathroom just so I can get some personal space while the kids pound on the door whining for mommy.

Bad mom days happen to everyone. It's part of being a mom.

Having a bad mom day doesn't make you a bad mom. If your kids are watching Frozen and eating chocolate before 9am, you aren't a bad mom. If your toddler is screaming he doesn't like you anymore while throwing a tantrum on the floor of Walmart because you won't buy him a Mountain Dew, you aren't a bad mom. If your baby has bedhead at 5pm from the night before, you aren't a bad mom.

You're a good mom, even when you have bad mom days.

You love your kids even when they barf in your hair, get poop all over their room, and spill an entire box of cereal on the kitchen floor right before you have to leave in the morning. Bad days happen. It's part of the unpredictability of being a parent. And if you want to go eat an entire loaf of pumpkin chocolate chip bread after the kids are in bed, I am definitely not going to judge you. I've been there, sister.

So I'm going to hold onto my good mom day. Because who knows what tomorrow holds. It's those good days that help us get through the bad days.

That, and pumpkin chocolate chip bread.


Chelsea Johnson is a wife to a medical student, mama of two toddlers, and blogger at Life With My Littles. She writes about pregnancy and raising kids, and eats way too much delicious food.


This article was originally published on Life With My Littles.

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