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For a long time the first photo the public would see of a celebrity who'd recently given birth was a carefully staged, lit and edited bikini photo under headlines about how she "got her body back." But today, celebs are turning the tables on this old trope, sharing their bodies and stories on their terms through social media.

We love this trend so much.

We love it because it helps postpartum mamas accept and love their own reflections, and because the next generation of moms won't grow up thinking that bumps disappear within days, and will know there is nothing wrong with them when the bump (and the stretch marks and scars) sticks around.

Check out these celebrity mamas who are honestly sharing their postpartum experience (and taking the pressure off the rest of us).

Ashley Graham

Model Ashley Graham has been super open about her postpartum body and we love her for it.

These stretch marks are on display on her Instagram grid and they are beautiful. She captioned the shot: "Same me. Few new stories."

We love how real Graham is about her postpartum experience, stretch marks and all.

Daphne Oz

Daphne Oz just had a baby 10 weeks before she posted this shot, so she was slowly returning to her workout routine. We love that, because she was giving her body time to heal. Giving birth is hard on the body!

"I'm not in a rush, I just want to start to feel my core again and strength in my skin. consistency and baby steps get it done," Oz wrote in an Instagram caption, noting that when she snapped this selfie she had just finished the second workout she's had since welcoming her youngest, Gigi.

This isn't the first time Daphne Oz has been refreshingly honest about postpartum life 

But this isn't the first time Oz has been super real about her expectations for her postpartum body. After having her third child, daughter Domenica, back in January 2018, the former co-host of The Chew posted a mirror selfie that sums up how so many fourth trimester mamas feel.

"Seven weeks post partum [sic], still looking three months pregnant," she captioned her photo. "There is no bounce-back, it's all onwards and upwards."

For the record, she still looked amazing in that pic. Both of these photos are amazing.

Katrina Scott

Tone It Up co-founder Katrina Scott has a degree in Health Promotion and Fitness. She knows her stuff and is using her platform to teach other mamas the truth about postpartum fitness: It takes time to for our bodies to build back core and pelvic floor strength, even if fitness is literally your business!

On an episode of The Motherly Podcast, Sponsored by Prudential, Scott explained: "We need to change the conversation with everyone and with ourselves and realize how cool it is that our bodies are different."

Ayesha Curry

In a recent interview with Working Mother Curry, a mom of three, explained that since becoming a mom when she's been depressed about her body, and struggled with her body, and regrets the decision to get her "boobs done" after her second daughter was weaned.

"The intention was just to have them lifted, but I came out with these bigger boobs I didn't want," she explains, adding that she's now trying to give her body more love and teach her kids to love what they see in the mirror, too.

"I'm not thin; I'm 170 pounds on a good day. It's been a journey for me, and that's why I want my girls to understand who they are—and to love it."

Chrissy Teigen 

Chrissy is a queen. We love how real she was about postpartum panties after Miles was born in May 2018, and she's never been shy about her stretch marks.

In March of 2019 she took to Twitter to talk about her postpartum body and how the former swimsuit model is in a new season of life, one where she's a mom of two and a cookbook author who unapologetically loves food.

"I am 20 pounds heavier than I was before Miles," she wrote. "[H]e's 10 months old. I never lost the last bit because I just love food too much. Just coming to terms with my new normal, when I had this certain number for so long!"

Kate Hudson 

Kate Hudson is basically fitness personified, but she's been super real about her postpartum recovery since the birth of daughter Rani Rose in October 2018.

A few short years ago the first picture the public saw of a celebrity postpartum looked a lot less real than this, but Hudson's honesty is part of a refreshing change in celebrity culture.

The era of headlines about celebrities "bouncing back" after pregnancy is behind us, and it's refreshing to see Hudson admitting that a mother's body doesn't change overnight after she gives birth.

Tia Mowry 

At seven weeks postpartum in June 2018, Tia Mowry explained how not seeing realistic postpartum images during her first pregnancy in 2011 negatively impacted her, so she chose to share her real body to help other mothers (and future mothers) understand that so-called snapbacks are an illusion.

"I remember after giving birth to Cree, my belly didn't all of a sudden go flat. I did have a C-Section, (as well as with my second pregnancy) and I thought something was wrong with me. I had seen in magazines the many women on the beach a few weeks #postpartum in a two piece. To be honest, it had to take time for me to embrace my new body. With this second pregnancy, I now have embraced that fact that I've housed a human being. A miracle. A life. If it takes a while for me to get back to my normal self, than so be it. This.Is.Me. And I love me."

Ali Manno

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In July 2018 former Bachelorette Ali Fedotowsky Manno posted what she called her "most vulnerable post on Instagram ever," showing her real postpartum belly to the world after welcoming her second child two months earlier.

"At the end of the day, I know it's important to be open and honest about my postpartum body in hopes that it helps even one person out there who is struggling with their own body image," Fedotowsky wrote.

Desiree  Siegfried 

Another mama from Bachelor nation, Desiree Siegfried also posted a post-baby mirror selfie at four days postpartum.

"So here I am 4 days postpartum looking like I'm still pregnant but feeling like a supermodel/ warrior," she captioned her pic.

Jessie James Decker

Jessie James Decker's postpartum mirror pic was a little further out, and shows that bumps sick around for a long time after birth and that's totally normal and okay.

"Keepin it real! 3 weeks post and I'm still very swollen. The 3rd has been by far the hardest recovery, but I'm feeling stronger every day," Decker wrote after the birth of her youngest in April 2018.

Jenny Mollen

Actress and author Jenny Mollen is known for sharing pretty much everything on Instagram, so it's no surprise that IG followers got to see her c-section scar In October 2017, at two weeks postpartum.

"I wish somebody had shown me a pic like this 9 months ago," Mollen wrote.

[This post was originally published March 3, 2019. It has been updated.]

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As a mid-Spring holiday, we never knew exactly what to expect from the weather on Easter when I was growing up in Michigan: Would we get to wear our new Sunday dresses without coats? Or would we be hunting for eggs while wearing snowsuits?

Although what the temperature had in store was really anyone's guess, there were a few special traditions my sister and I could always depend on—and it won't come as a surprise to anyone who knows me that my favorite memories revolved around food. After all, experts say memories are strongest when they tie senses together, which certainly seems to be true when it comes to holiday meals that involve the sounds of laughter and the taste of amazing food.

Now that I'm a parent, I'm experiencing Easter anew as my children discover the small delights of chocolate, pre-church brunch and a multi-generational dinner. While I still look forward to the treats and feasting, I'm realizing now that the sweetest thing of all is how these traditions bring our family together around one table.

For us, the build-up to Easter eats is an extended event. Last year's prep work began weeks in advance when my 3-year-old and I sat down to plan the brunch menu, which involved the interesting suggestion of "green eggs and ham." When the big morning rolled around, his eyes grew to the size of Easter eggs out of pure joy when the dish was placed on the table.

This year, rather than letting the day come and go in a flash, we are creating traditions that span weeks and allow even the littlest members of the family to feel involved.

Still, as much as I love enlisting my children's help, I also relish the opportunity to create some magic of my own with their Easter baskets—even if the Easter Bunny gets the credit. This year, I'm excited to really personalize the baskets by getting an "adoptable" plush unicorn for my daughter and the Kinder Chocolate Mini Eggs that my son hasn't stopped talking about since seeing at the store. (You can bet this mama is stocking up on some for herself, too.)

At the same time, Easter as a parent has opened my eyes to how much effort can be required...

There is the selection of the right Easter outfits for picture-perfect moments.

There is the styling of custom Easter baskets.

There is the filling of plastic eggs and strategic placement of them throughout the yard.

But when the cameras are put away and we all join together around the table for the family dinner at the end of the day, I can finally take a deep breath and really enjoy—especially with the knowledge that doing the dishes is my husband's job.

This article was sponsored by Kinder. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.


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For those who are used to having their child's grandparents around, the social distancing protocols during the coronavirus pandemic can be especially hard. With senior citizens and older adults being an at-risk group, many families have been separated in order to stop the spread of COVID-19, but as Amy Schumer proved this week that isn't stopping families from showing some love.

Schumer and her son stood on the street in a video posted to Instagram Monday, waving a sign that reads: "Hi Grandpa! We Love You!"

Schumer captioned the video: "Visiting dad" and the camera pans from her to her dad watching her from a window.

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Schumer has been social distancing with her son and her husband for quite a while now. She gave her husband a DIY haircut last week while isolating, like many house-bound families have been doing.

The coronavirus has forced so many families into a bubble and these are hard times, but posts like Schumer's remind us that we're all in this together (and that we should FaceTime our kids' grandparents).

News

Chances are, social distancing boredom is starting to set in. You've cleaned your home, watched your favorite Netflix movies (several times), cooked several meals from your stockpile and you've managed to do this all while homeschooling your little one. Good job, mama!

While we can manage our own boredom, trying to keep our kids entertained has been a real challenge. These days our saving grace has been a host of indoor activities, and now, neighborhoods are creating "bear hunts" to help kids minimize boredom even more.

The idea was inspired by the children's book We're Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen and Helen Oxenbury and is exactly how it sounds. You walk around your neighborhood in search of stuffed bears in windows. Put simply, it's the perfect way to get fresh air while practicing social distancing. Even more, it's the perfect distraction that unites neighborhoods and families.

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To get in on the action, visit the "Going on a Bear Hunt" website to find out where the bears are near you or how to start the hunt in your town. Once you've decided your path, sing "We're Going on a Bear Hunt" song to add some fun to your experience.

Shanna Bonner Groom, who spearheaded the recent bear hunting initiative in the Stewart Springs neighborhood of Murfreesboro, Tennessee told TIME that she got the word out by posting the idea in her neighborhood's private Facebook group after seeing it floating around on social media.

"Within hours, everybody was responding and wanting to join in," she said. "Everybody's trying to enjoy this time at home with each other but do social distancing at the same time. So we're trying to come up with some fun activities."

The bear hunt isn't stopping in the United States, in fact many have spotted bears in cities as far as London and New Zealand.

"To the parent (it's gotta be a parent) who came up with this idea, THANK YOU. Explaining to a 4-yr-old why playdates aren't allowed anymore is heartbreaking, so "Going on a Bear Hunt" during our walks is the distraction we needed," says London-based mama, Daniele Hamamdjian.

Indeed, the world needs as many furry friends as possible right now.

News

Social distancing is hard on parents, kids and grandparents, but there is good news on the coronavirus front: New data reveals the restrictions and recommendations keeping people apart during the pandemic could be working. As the New York Times reports, new data from a company that makes internet-connected thermometers, Kinsa Health, is "making it clear that social distancing is saving lives."

Kinsa hosts a map of fever levels across the U.S. to track feverish illness levels across the U.S. Right now the map is suggesting that "due to widespread social distancing, school closures, stay-at-home orders, etc. feverish illness levels are dropping in many regions," Kinsa notes.

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The company adds, "This does not mean that COVID-19 cases are declining. In fact, we expect to see reported cases continue to surge in the near term, but it may indicate these measures are starting to slow the spread."

At the beginning of this week, more than three-quarters of the country showed a significant decline in fevers (Kinsa has about 1 million thermometers uploading more than 150,000 temperature readings per day).

The results of early social distancing protocols can be seen when comparing different regions in the U.S. Dr. George Rutherford, an epidemiologist and infectious disease expert at UC San Francisco, tells The Los Angeles Times that early social distancing measures taken in California "happened closer to the introduction of the virus, so you haven't had as many generations of transmission. So there are fewer cases per capita in the population."

Rutherford is cautiously optimistic that the Bay Area will not see as many cases as New York because it seems like the early social distancing measures are working (if people keep abiding by them).

Up the coast, Jeff Duchin, Seattle & King County's Public Health Officer, says "The bottom line here should be that what we're doing now appears to be working, that we should in no way take these findings as an indication to relax our social distancing strategy, that we need to continue this for weeks."

President Trump agrees and wants people to stay home until April 30, and Virgina's Governor wants social distancing to continue in his state until June.

It's a long process and a challenging one—but it's working, mama.

News

Winter is over and the world is beginning to bloom again. Mamas with April due dates can consider themselves lucky to be so in sync with Mother Nature. Being born during this month of renewal will have a lasting impact on springtime babies, because science shows your birth month matters.

Keep reading... Show less
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