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We're only just starting to see those first leaves turning, but before you know it, winter will be here, mama. Winter tends to bring with it a bit of a travel itch (it's totally natural to want to be somewhere warm when your driveway is filling with snow) but also an increase in airfare prices.

If you want to take a winter vacation the best time to book is right now, travel experts say.

"Now would be a great time to start looking and booking, frankly, if you're looking to travel in the winter," a consumer travel expert at Hopper Liana Corwin, recently told Travel + Leisure.

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That's because we are in the middle of a travel booking lull, Corwin's colleague, Hayley Berg, an economist at Hopper, told ABC News. "There's really low travel demand. You see people going back to school, not a lot of demand for vacation, [so] airlines have to adjust prices to still fills seats."

So if you know from experience that you'll be desperate for a tropical getaway when the kids are in snowsuits, book now.

If you want to make travel plans specifically for the holidays, the timing get a little more precise, mama. You can mark your calendars for some important dates.

According to a new report from Expedia, the cheapest time to book Thanksgiving flights is October 29 to November 13 and the best time to book Christmas flights is November 23 to December 9.

Basically, if you know you want to vacation in the winter, book well in advance, but if you're flying to meet family for the holidays, you should book within those specific windows.

And if winter is too far away for you, consider not only booking now but also traveling now, if you can. "Fall is really the best time to travel, period," Tracy Stewart, content editor at Airfarewatchdog tells The Washington Post. "Not only are fares lower, but crowds tend to thin out at major attractions, and temperatures are usually somewhere in the Goldilocks range."

If your kids aren't yet in school or if you're not planning on traveling with them (girls' trips are good for your health, mama!), start packing.

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