On the 1 year anniversary of George Floyd's death, Biden meets with his daughter + family

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki told reporters, "He wanted this meeting to be private in order to have a real conversation and preserve that with the family."

Gianna-Floyd-holding-photo-of-George-Floyd

Today is the one-year anniversary of George Floyd's death, and to mark the occasion, President Biden will meet privately with his daughter and family members at The White House. Additionally, memorial events and marches are happening across the country today.

George Floyd died after police officer Derek Chauvin used excessive force during an altercation with police in Minneapolis. His death sparked a series of Black Lives Matter protests across the country (and globally), as well as calls for police reform and an end to systemic racism and injustice still prevalent throughout society. In April, Chauvin stood trial and was found guilty on three charges: second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter.

As we ponder how things have changed in the last year and the massive amount of work left to do, The White House's message of hope and unity is evident with Biden's invitation to Floyd's family today.


At Monday's press briefing with journalists, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki told reporters, "He wanted this meeting to be private in order to have a real conversation and preserve that with the family. He has a genuine relationship with them, and the courage and grace of this family and especially his daughter Gianna Floyd, has really stuck with the President, as you have seen him talk about Kelly and others, many times over the past several months," Psaki said. "So, he's eager to listen to their perspectives and hear what they have to say."

In March, The House of Representatives approved the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which is aimed at preventing police misconduct. The bill had previously stalled, but now has another opportunity to pass in the Democratic-controlled Senate, which has a 50-50 partisan split with Vice President Kamala Harris acting as tie breaker. Lawmakers are optimistic the legislation will pass soon.

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