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In recent months we've heard a lot about the MMR vaccine and why the CDC really wants parents to Measles, Mumps and Rubella (aka the MMR vaccine) as outbreaks continue.

But parents might not know that they too, may need a booster if they were born before 1989.

The CDC is currently reporting 695 cases of measles from 22 states. That's a record number of reported cases since measles was eliminated from the United States in 2000. "I encourage all Americans to adhere to CDC vaccine guidelines in order to protect themselves, their families, and their communities from measles and other vaccine preventable diseases. We must work together as a Nation to eliminate this disease once and for all," CDC Director Robert Redfield said this week.

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Back in the day, one shot was the standard protocol, but one shot of the MMR vaccine isn't as effective as two. One dose is about 93% effective against measles, 78% effective against mumps, and 97% effective against rubella, according to the CDC, which notes that two doses kicks the protection up to a 97% effectiveness rate against measles and 88% effective against mumps.

If you don't know your vaccination history or know that you only got one shot, you should ask your doctor if they recommend another one. Not everyone born before 1989 automatically needs one (some people in that age range may have an ideal vaccination history), but certain populations, including those vaccinated prior to 1968 could be at risk if they don't get a booster.

The CDC notes that healthcare workers and women who may become pregnant should make sure their MMR vaccinations are up to date. "It is safe for breastfeeding women to receive MMR vaccination," the CDC notes. "Breastfeeding does not interfere with the response to MMR vaccine, and the baby will not be affected by the vaccine through breast milk."

How do you know if you need another dose?

If you don't have one of the following pieces of evidence of immunity, talk to your doctor:

  1. Written documentation of adequate (2 dose) vaccination.
  2. Laboratory evidence of immunity or lab confirmation of measles.
  3. A birthdate before 1957. According to the CDC, the "majority of people born before 1957 are likely to have been infected naturally and therefore are presumed to be protected against measles, mumps, and rubella," however, the CDC still recommends that healthcare workers born before 1957 who don't have laboratory evidence of immunity or disease should consider getting two doses of the MMR vaccine.

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There should be more left-side letters in yours and your parents' names and more right-side letters in each of your children's names. Weird, huh? That's what some scientists thought, too, so they set out to determine why and discovered a similar pattern across five languages.

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