Mike Fisher opens up about the emotional moment Carrie Underwood told him about her pregnancy loss

For Fisher, letting himself grieve the loss and admit his emotions was key.

Mike Fisher opens up about the emotional moment Carrie Underwood told him about her pregnancy loss
Courtesy "Mike and Carrie: God & Country"

Carrie Underwood and her hockey player husband Mike Fisher have been very open about suffering multiple miscarriages, and while the couple is now enjoying time with their rainbow baby, 16-month-old Jacob Bryan, Fisher is speaking out about his feelings experiencing pregnancy loss in an effort to help other fathers.

In the couple's new series Mike and Carrie: God & Country, the NHL player talks candidly about the moments he learned his wife was going through pregnancy loss.


"She's like, 'I lost the baby.' And I was like, 'Again?' says Fischer. "You have all these mountaintops, but we hadn't had a ton of valleys like this."

Fisher's comments come one year after his wife spoke about the same time in their lives during an appearance on CBS Sunday Morning.

Last June Underwood revealed that her second pregnancy wasn't really her second pregnancy. In the two years before becoming pregnant with Jacob, she had been pregnant three other times.

"I'd kind of planned that 2017 was, you know, going to be the year that I work on new music, and I have a baby. We got pregnant early 2017, and it didn't work out," she explained, adding that she got pregnant again in the spring of 2017 and again suffered a pregnancy loss. Another positive pregnancy test and another devastating loss followed in early 2018.

She loved her son Isaiah, now 5, so much, and would lay beside him as he slept, crying over his lost siblings.

"I put a lot of stress on myself—I feel like a lot of moms do, a lot of women do," she later told People. According to Underwood, "the best moments in my life are when I say, 'Hey, I can't control everything, and that's okay."

For Underwood, giving up control over her life was helpful. For Fisher, letting himself grieve the loss and admit his emotions was key.

Pregnancy loss is common, it happens in up to 25% of pregnancies and it's okay to feel angry, sad or frustrated when it happens to you (even if you're a tough hockey player).

In This Article