Giant inflatable breasts in London prove a point about breastfeeding we can't ignore

Moms shouldn't have to hide while feeding their children.

Giant inflatable breasts in London prove a point about breastfeeding we can't ignore

Residents of London, England looked up this week to see giant, inflatable breasts decorating rooftops around the city.

They started popping up on the UK's Mother's Day, March 31, to remind everyone how important it is to normalize public breastfeeding and draw attention to how moms need support to meet their breastfeeding goals.

The stunt was organized by the Elvie, the tech firm behind a new wearable breast pump, and was meant as "an invitation to everyone to stand with all those women that have felt shamed or confined when breastfeeding or pumping."

Five different giant breasts of different sizes and skin tones went up in the city to inspire a conversation about why breastfeeding moms often feel like they're being forced to hide, and how that manifests into Britain having such low breastfeeding rates.

"We know the giant boobs will raise a few eyebrows, but we want to make sure no one overlooks the way this stigma has been used to repress women." Tania Boler, CEO of Elvie, told the Shropshire Star.

Boler is kind of obsessed with helping women be as free as possible while breastfeeding. "Our mission is to use technology so you can enjoy your womanhood. One of the key things for new mums—we need to be multitasking. We need to be back at work, we need to be professional, we need to be a mother, we need to be a wife. So Elvie pump was designed so you can be the woman you want to be and the mom you want to be," Boler told Motherly back in August.

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The breasts have now been deflated, but the folks at Elvie want people to keep talking about normalizing breastfeeding in the UK.

Studies suggest that campaigns promoting breastfeeding can make a difference, as "exposure to breastfeeding [can] improve overall comfort levels, but it may also help to narrow the gap that is growing between the acceptability of bottle-feeding in public and the acceptability of breastfeeding in public," researchers note.

One thing is clear, this stunt may have been clever marketing, but it also got people talking about something we need to talk about.

More giant, inflatable breasts, please.

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