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When teen climate activist Greta Thunberg gave an impassioned speech at the United Nations Climate Action Summit this week her words hit many parents right in the heart. We are supposed to be protecting our kids, but Thunberg proves many of our kids don't feel like we're doing that.

"I shouldn't be up here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean, yet you all come to us young people for hope," Thunberg said.

She continued: "You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words."

Thunberg and so many children like her are counting on our generation to do something, and the good news is you don't have to be a world leader to take action.

Here are five ways you can help fight climate change today, mama:

1. Ditch the disposables

It seems like a small thing, but being more intentional about what we consume is an important way to fight climate change. As National Geographic reports, about 40% of the plastic goods made every year are made to be thrown away, but they are not biodegradable and are ending up in our oceans.

Back in 1955 Life magazine published a photo of a family throwing disposable plates, cups and utensils up into the air. The headline was "Throwaway Living," and the article explained it would take hours to clean all those objects but "that no housewife need bother" because they were disposable.

"Throwaway Living" promised women freedom but it didn't deliver. We're still doing the lion's share of the housework (even if most of us aren't "housewives" anymore) but we're also tossing tons of plastics each week. By ditching paper towels and plastic wrap for more eco-friendly alternatives we can start making a difference in our own homes.

[Editor's note: Mothers should not feel guilty about using disposable diapers. While using cloth diapers is a great alternative for some it is not always feasible for every parent. We support mothers in choosing whatever works best for their family.]

2. Consider reusable containers 

So much of that 40% of the world's plastic is actually not only meant to be disposable but meant to be disposed of within five minutes of landing in the hands of the end consumer. We can make small changes to our shopping habits and eliminate everything from produce bags to toothpaste tubes by bringing our own containers to the grocery store or simply making more conscious decisions about what we buy.

We can involve our kids by asking them to help us find household containers to repurpose or get their help making our own produce bags.

3. Eat more plants

For a lot of people, going vegan today is not an option, but we can all eat more plants and reduce our dependance on meat. A report from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (compiled by 100 scientists from more than 50 nations) suggests that if we just eat more plant-based meals we could mitigate some problems associated with climate change.

Cattle produce a lot of emissions. There are things cattle producers can do to reduce this, but simply by demanding fewer cattle we can reduce it. We can encourage food manufacturers to consider plant-based alternatives by buying more of them.

It's time for a #meatlessmonday, even if you can't go fully vegan right this second.

4. Travel with intention

Using public transportation or being more active can be fun for kids and a way to be intentional about fighting climate change. When possible, take the bus or train or take your kids for a bike ride. Some of your travel needs may have to happen by car, but just try to be conscious of how you can reduce the discretionary trips.

Greta Thunberg gave up flying to flight climate change. Some sustainability experts have not gone as far for practical reasons and instead do things like cut the number of their trips and/or the distance.

You may not be able to give up your car or flying right now, but we can all be more intentional about our travel and explain to our children why we are doing so.

5. Demand politicians take action 

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Call your reps and let then know you are listening to the next generation, and ask if they are, too. Ask them what they are doing to ensure the children in your community will still be able to live there decades from now.

If you don't know what number to call, you can either call the US Capitol switchboard or punch your info into callmycongress.com and get the direct phone numbers. An election is looming and now is the time to ask those holding seats and those hoping to win them not only where they stand on climate change but what, exactly, they plan to do about it.

Our kids can't vote yet, so they need us to keep lawmakers accountable.

In her speech Thunberg had a message for our generation:

"You are failing us, but the young people are starting to understand your betrayal ... Right here, right now is where we draw the line. The world is waking up, and change is coming whether you like it or not."

It's hard to make changes, but we need to. Our children deserve to dream about the future. They shouldn't have to be fighting for one.

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Our babies come out as beautiful, soft and natural as can be—shouldn't their clothes follow suit?

Here are nine of our favorite organic kids clothing brands that prove safe fabrics + stylish designs are a natural fit.

Estella

A brick and mortar store in Manhattan that opened in 2002, Estella is NYC's go-to shop for luxury baby gifts—from sweet-as-pie organic clothing to eco-friendly toys.

L'ovedbaby

@lovedbaby

We l'oved this collection from the moment we laid eyes on it. (See what we did there 🤣) Free of things harsh added chemicals, dangerous flame retardants, and harmful dyes, this collection is 100% organic and 100% gorgeous. We especially adore their soft, footed rompers, comfy cotton joggers, and newborn-friendly kimono bodysuits.

Looking to stock up? Don't miss Big-Find Thursday every week on their site—a 24-hour flash sale that happens Thursdays at 9 a.m. PST and features a different body style, collection, and discount every week!

Hanna Andersson

@happyhannas

One of our all-time favorite brands for durability, style, + customer service, Hanna Andersson doesn't disappoint in the organic department, either. From an aww-inducing organic baby layette collection all the way to their iconic pajamas, there are so many organic styles to swoon over from this beloved brand. And we swear their pajamas are magic—they seem to grow with your little one, fitting season after season!

Monica + Andy

@monicaandandy

The fabric you first snuggle your baby in matters. Monica + Andy's (gorgeous) collection is designed for moms and babies by moms with babies, and we love it all because it's made of super-soft GOTS-certified organic cotton that's free of chemicals, lead, and phthalates. Newborn pieces feature thoughtful details like fold-over mittens and feet.

Finn + Emma

@finnandemma

"Here boring designs and toxic chemicals are a thing of the past while modern colors, fresh prints and heirloom quality construction are abundant." We couldn't agree more. Made from 100% organic cotton, eco friendly dyes, and in fair trade settings, we love this modern collection's mix of style + sustainability.

We especially love the Basics Collection, an assortment of incredibly soft, beautiful apparel + accessories including bodysuits, zip footies, pants, hats, and bibs, all available in a gender-neutral color palette that can work together to create multiple outfit combinations. The pieces are perfect for monochrome looks or for mixing with prints for a more modern style.

SoftBaby

@littleaddigrey for @softbaby_clothes

You'll come for SoftBaby's organic fabrics, but you'll stay for their adorable assortment of prints. From woodland foxes to urban pugs, there's no limit to their assortment (meaning you'll even be able to find something for the new mama who's hard to shop for). Plus, the name says it all--these suckers are soft. Get ready for some serious cuddle time.

Gap Baby

@gapkids

Organic may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the Gap, but this popular brand actually carries a wide variety of organic (and adorable) baby + toddler clothes. From newborn layette basics to toddler sleepwear—and more—there's something for everyone in this collection. Everything is 100% cotton, super soft + cozy, and perfect for eco-conscious mamas.

Winter Water Factory

@winterwaterfactory

Certified organic cotton with Brooklyn-based swagger? Be still our hearts. Winter Water Factory features screen-printed textiles in bold designs you'll want to show off (get ready for some major Instagram likes). And the husband-and-wife co-founders keep sustainability at the forefront of their brand, meaning you can feel good about your purchase--and what you're putting on your baby.

The company makes everything from kids' clothes to crib sheets (all made in the USA). For even more cuteness, pair their signature rompers with a hat or bonnet.

Under the Nile

@underthenile

Under the Nile has been making organic baby clothes since before it was cool. Seriously, they were the first baby clothing company in the USA to be certified by The Global Organic Textile Standard. They've kept up that legacy of high standards by growing their Egyptian cotton on a biodynamic farm without the use of pesticides or insecticides, and all of their prints are made with metal-free colors and no chemical finishes.

Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

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Whether I live next to you or across the country, social media makes it easy for us to stay updated on each other's lives and that's a wonderful thing. I love seeing pictures of your kids and I think it's great that you choose to share videos of your child singing, giggling and taking his or her first steps.

I simply choose not to share pregnant pictures, or even a family photo from the hospital once our daughter arrived because my pregnancy, birth and growing family are parts of my life I wanted to protect from the outside world.

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