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Are you registered to vote, mama?

You can check here (and register, too).

Are you registered to vote, mama?

As mothers we're changing the world through our children, but we can also change the world for them by showing up to vote on election day.

The upcoming midterm elections aren't as flashy as the general, but they are just as important. Those 435 seats in the House of Representatives matter, as do the senatorial spots, but unfortunately midterm elections usually attract fewer voters than presidential elections.

We need to change that this year.

The upcoming midterm elections are a historic moment for women, as record numbers of us are running. As fivethirtyeight reports, historically speaking, women voters have not gravitated towards women candidates, but millennials are changing that: According to a USA Today/Suffolk University poll, a third of women ages 18 to 34 would rather vote for a woman over a man.

So many women are running this year, but in order to turn those runs into representation, we need to make sure that record numbers of us are voting, too.

Here's how to check if you are registered to vote, and what to do if you're not:

Check to see if you're registered 

If you've moved or changed your name recently, it's really important to check if you're registered to vote. And even if you haven't changed anything, you should still check.

The deadlines to register to vote vary by state. In some places you can register right up until election day, but in many states, the deadlines are much sooner—we're talking this week. (If you're in North Dakota you don't need to register to vote, it's the one state that doesn't require it).

You can check to see if you're registered using this tool from Vote.org.

What to do if you're not registered 

In most states (and DC) you can register online to vote.

You can even do it right here, right now.

Make a plan for election day 

Okay, now that you're registered to vote, you can start planning for November 6. Find out who is running in your area, research them, email them, DM them, and figure out if they are the right representative for you.

Find out where your local polling place is (you can enter your address here), arrange childcare if necessary, and make sure you bring your ID because two-thirds of states either require or can request that you provide some.

It's crazy to think that we, as women, have only had the privilege of voting for 98 years. That's how long it's been since the 19th amendment gave America's women the right to participate in democracy. We have the right. Now we have to exercise it.

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This is how we’re defining success this school year

Hint: It's not related to grades.

In the ever-moving lives of parents and children, opportunities to slow down and reflect on priorities can be hard to come by. But a new school year scheduled to begin in the midst of a global pandemic offers the chance to reflect on how we should all think about measures of success. For both parents and kids, that may mean putting a fresh emphasis on optimism, creativity and curiosity.

Throughout recent decades, "school success" became entangled with "academic achievement," with cases of anxiety among school children dramatically increasing in the past few generations. Then, almost overnight, the American school system was turned on its head in the spring of 2020. As we look ahead to a new school year that will look like no year past, more is being asked of teachers, students and parents, such as acclimating to distance learning, collaborating with peers from afar and aiming to maintain consistency with schooling amidst general instability due to COVID.

Despite the inherent challenges, there is also an overdue opportunity to redefine success during the school year by finding fresh ways to keep students and their parents involved in the learning process.

"I always encourage my son to try at least one difficult thing every school year," says Arushi Garg, parenting blogger and mom of a 4-year-old. "This challenges him but also allows me to remind him to be optimistic! Lots of things in life are hard, and it's important we learn to be positive during difficult times. Fostering a sense of optimism allows kids to push beyond what they thought possible, like biking without training wheels or reading above their grade level."

Here are a few mantras to keep in mind this school year:

Quality learning matters more than quantifying learning

After focusing on standardized measures of academic success for so long, the learning environment this next school year may involve more independent, remote learning. Some parents are considering this an exciting opportunity for their children to assume a bigger role in what they are learning—and parents are also getting on board by supporting their children's education with engaging, positive learning materials like Highlights Magazine.

As a working mom, Garg also appreciates that Highlights Magazine can help engage her son while she's also working. She says, "He sits next to me and solves puzzles in the magazine or practices his writing from the workbook."

Keep an open mind as "school" looks different

Whether children are of preschool age or in the midst of high school, "going to school" is bound to look different this year. Naturally, this may require some adjustment as kids become accustomed to new guidelines. Although many parents may wish to shelter our kids from challenges, others believe optimism can be fostered through adversity when everyone is committed to adapting to new experiences.

"Honestly, I am yet to figure out when I will be comfortable sending [my son] back [to school]," says Garg. In the meantime, she's helping her son remain connected with friends who also read Highlights Magazine by encouraging the kids to talk about what they are learning on video calls.

Follow children's cues about what interests them

For Garg, her biggest hope for this school year is that her son will create "success" for himself by embracing new learning possibilities with positivity.

"Encouraging my son to try new things has given him a chance to prove that he can do anything," she says. "He takes his previous success as an example now and feels he can fail multiple times before he succeeds."

There's no denying that this school year will be far from the norm. But, perhaps, we can create a new, better way of defining our children's success in school because of it.

This article was sponsored by Highlights. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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