As parents we put a lot of pressure on ourselves when it comes to meal planning, but sometimes the plan for a homecooked, organic meal just doesn't happen.

And that's totally okay. If you're thinking you're going to have to do hot dogs or breakfast-for-dinner tonight, don't worry and don't feel guilty. Your kids will probably love a cheap and easy meal. Joanna Gaines' kids sure did.

The mogul and mama of five recently opened up to Jenna Bush Hager for Southern Living magazine and explained that when her dinner plans fell through and she had to go with a super simple plan B, 13-year- old Drake, 12-year-old Ella, 9-year-old Duke and 8-year-old Emmie Kay totally loved it.

"Two weeks ago, I came home exhausted," she said. "I'd forgotten about meal planning and had five bags of 30-cent ramen, which I made for dinner."

According to Jo, the kids were "in hog heaven" while chowing down on the cuisine commonly associated with broke college students. The novelty made it so fun and special, and mom's guilt was unnecessary.

(Yes, Jo wrote a cookbook, but that doesn't mean mama's gotta cook every single night.)

"While I was beating myself up for giving them my second best, they loved it. And I found grace in that moment," Jo explains.

Jo says she's felt plenty of mom guilt in recent months since welcoming baby Crew, but when she feels guilt creeping in she's mindful about not wallowing in it, which allows it to become paralyzing.

Instead, she moves through those guilty moments and looks for the grace and love around her and in herself. When she's kind and empathetic with herself, she's able to give to support other moms who are having their own ramen noodle nights.

"I want to be that person who encourages other moms," she told Bush Hager. "I remember those times when I was home and couldn't even take a shower," she explains, adding that social media comparisons don't help in a busy season of life, and that we all need to be cheerleaders for ourselves and other mamas in our lives (even if all we were able to do that day was put noodles in a pot).

Jo continues: "Celebrate others doing little things as well as big things, and celebrate yourself by saying, 'This is what I was meant to do.' I really want women to feel encouraged. Know that you are doing enough. Own yourself."

Own that ramen, mama. Maybe tomorrow you will make a home-cooked dinner, but tonight your kids are going to be so excited about those little flavor packets.

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