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They're loud, fast, exciting and sometimes they are even labeled as educational, but a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests high-tech toys should be left off the shopping list this Christmas.

The AAP's new report, Selecting Appropriate Toys for Young Children in the Digital Era, suggests parents pass over overstimulating light and sound toys, digital devices and apps and choose old-school items like blocks or dolls instead.

The AAP stresses that high-quality toys don't have to come with a high price tag, and that the best toys are the ones that are developmentally appropriate and encourage kids and parents to play together. They're worried that in recent years parents have come to see flashy toys and apps as necessary for child development, when they are not and can actually be disruptive to the parent-child relationship.

"While it's easy to fall victim to the marketing, you are your child's best teacher," the AAP notes.

Kids are going to learn more playing with mama than they would from any app and there are a ton of pediatrician-approved toys that can help facilitate that play (and that kids can also engage in solitary play with as they age).

Here's what the AAP wants to see under the tree instead of an iPad:

1. Motor skills builders 

Old-school basics like wooden blocks, shapes, puzzles, and trains help children with fine-motor skills, as well as language and math skills. They can also grow with our children, the report's authors note.

"For example, an 18-month-old child might try to use blocks functionally (eg, stack them), whereas a 2-year-old might use the same blocks to engage in sophisticated symbolic play (eg, by feeding the doll with a block that represents a bottle) or use the same blocks to construct a bridge, demonstrating the development of spatial awareness."

2. Pretend playthings 

Dolls, action figures, and toy animals spark imaginative play and help kids learn to tell stories and put words to feelings. The same goes for toy objects, like fake food or little cars. These symbolic toys don't have to do anything fancy, because they invite children to create their own action.

"Such imaginative play ultimately facilitates language development, self-regulation, symbolic thinking, and social-emotional development," according to the AAP.

3. Art supplies 

Paint, paper, colors and glue foster creativity andmotor skills. The AAP considers art supplies a "high quality" toy, but says they don't need to be expensive. In fact, in some cases they don't even have to cost mama anything. A cardboard box can be an art supply if you want it to be.

4. Physical playthings 

Balls, tricycles and things to push and pull help kids' physical and social development. When they play with catch with mom or dad they're learning how to move their body and that physical activity is fun, a lesson that kids need now more than ever.

Add a friend to the mix and two kids taking turns with a ride-on toy are figuring out how to "improve self-regulation and peer-interaction" because they're having to negotiate with each other.

5. Language toys 

According to the AAP, physical card and board games build kids' language skills in a way that an app version of the same game can't. Toy letters are a fun introduction to early literacy and the tactile factor makes them way more meaningful to kids than a letter on a screen.

Bottom line: Technology helps us parents connect with each other and the wider world, but when it comes to stocking the toy box, it's time we get back to basics. Our children don't need to connect to the internet, they just need to connect with us .

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Motherhood is a practice in learning, growing and loving more than you ever thought possible. Even as a "veteran" mama of four young sons and one newly adopted teenager, Jalyssa Richardson enthusiastically adapts to whatever any given day has in store—a skill she says she's refined through the years.

Here's what just one day in her life looks like:


Jalyssa says she learned to embrace agility throughout her motherhood journey. Here's more from this incredible mama of five boys.

What is the most challenging part of your day as a mom of five?

Time management! I want to meet each of the boys' individual needs—plus show up for myself—but I often feel like someone gets overlooked.

What's the best part of being a mom of five?

The little moments of love. The hugs, the kisses, the cuddles, the smiles... they all serve as little reminders that I am blessed and I'm doing okay.

Are there misconceptions about raising boys?

There are so many misconceptions about raising boys. I think the biggest one is that boys don't have many emotions and they're just so active all the time. My boys display many emotions and they also love to be sweet and cuddly a lot of the time.

What do you think would surprise people the most about being a mom of five?

How much I enjoy it. I never knew I wanted to be a mom until I was pregnant with my first. My desire only grew and the numbers did! I am surprised with every single baby as my capacity to love and nurture grows. It's incredible.

How do you create balance and make time for yourself?

Balance for me looks like intentional planning and scheduling because I never want my boys to feel like they aren't my first priority, but it is extremely difficult. What I try to do is not fit it all into one day. I have work days because motherhood is my first priority. I fit in segments of self-care after the kids' bedtime so I don't grow weary.

What's the biggest lesson you have learned from motherhood?

I have learned that sacrifice is actually beautiful. I was terrified of the selflessness motherhood would require, but I've grown so much through the sacrifice. There is nothing better than living for something bigger than myself.

When did you first feel like a mom? How has your motherhood evolved?

I first felt like a mom when I was pregnant with my first son and I intentionally chose to change my eating habits so my body could be strong and healthy for him. I didn't have to think twice—I just did what I thought would be best for him. That decision being so effortless made me realize I was made for motherhood.

My perspective has changed with each baby as I've realized motherhood doesn't have to be one-size-fits-all. With my first son, I was a by-the-book mama and it was so stressful. With each baby, I have felt more freedom and it has made motherhood so much more beautiful. I have evolved into the mother that they need, I am perfect for these boys.

This article was sponsored by Dr. Brown's. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.


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