Menu

Starbucks now offers backup childcare as a benefit for its employees 👏

This can help take a lot of stress off working parents.

Starbucks now offers backup childcare as a benefit for its employees 👏

Maybe your mom usually watches the kids, but she's sick today. Maybe your partner is stuck doing emergency overtime and can't come home before your shift starts. Maybe your regular babysitter just totaled her car. As much as working parents plan our schedules, there are things in life we just can't predict.

Unfortunately, rigid workplace cultures don't always reflect the fact that these things happen, but a major employer is making a huge step by not only recognizing that childcare emergencies come up, but also helping parents pay for backup care when they do.

Starbucks is offering employees at U.S. company-owned stores 10 subsidized backup care days a year through Care.com.

👏👏👏

When a childcare crunch happens, Starbucks workers' benefits include 10 days where they can pay just $1 an hour for in-home backup child care ($2 an hour after the fourth child) or $5 a day per child for in-center child care.


"This is giving our partners resources for things that happen in regular life. We wanted to give them something to help fill in the gaps," says Ron Crawford, vice president of benefits at Starbucks.

This is huge, and we hope more employers follow suit because at a time when families are paying almost as much for childcare as they are for housing, subsidized childcare is a major perk.

It's also a really rare one.

The Associated Press reports only 9% of companies with 1,000 employees or more offered back-up child care as a benefit, according to a 2017 survey of U.S. employers by the Society for Human Resource Management.

Most employers don't offer this, but maybe they should think about it. According to a report by the Center for American Progress, in 2016 almost 2 million parents of kids under 5 had to quit a job, turn down a job or greatly change their job because of issues finding care providers.

Motherly's own 2018 State of Motherhood survey yielded similar results: A full half of respondents told us they've made changes to their work status—like shifting from full to part-time or quitting to stay home—since becoming parents.

Hopefully, Starbucks is starting a benefit trend that will be as popular as its drinks, because if there's anything parents need as much as coffee, it's help with childcare.

You might also like:

In This Article

Is the BabyBjörn portable travel crib worth it?

100% unequivocally yes.

I have this weird brown birthmark on the bottom of my right foot near my pinkie toe and my mother always said, "That means you'll never stay still. You'll travel everywhere." (She's full of interesting superstitions like that.) I'm not sure if it was a self-fulfilling prophecy or what but I've always had a love for travel, and before we had a child (in those glorious pre-pandemic times), my husband and I traveled all over Europe, did two road trips across different parts of the United States and even flew all the way around the world to visit my family in the Philippines.

I had this weird idea that I had to get all my traveling in before I became a mom. Because once you become a mom, you just become content sitting at home with the kids, right?

Eh, wrong.

Keep reading Show less
Shop

10 photos to take on baby’s first day that you'll cherish forever

You'll obsess over these newborn baby pictures.

Bethany Menzel: Instagram + Blog

As you're preparing for baby's birth, we bet you're dreaming of all of the amazing photos you'll take of your precious new babe. As a professional photographer and mama, I have some tips for newborn photos you'll want to capture.

Here are the 10 photos you will want to take on baby's first day.

Keep reading Show less
Life

Cameron Diaz on having a baby at 47: 'You really have to work hard for it'

"The only pressure for me now is I have to live to be, like, 107, you know? No pressure!"

This is the decade that saw the face of first-time motherhood change. The number of first-time mamas under 30 is shrinking, while more and more women are becoming moms after 40.

Cameron Diaz is one of them. The actress and businesswoman, now 48, became a mom in January at the age of 47. In a new episode of Naomi Campbell's YouTube series, No Filter, Diaz opens up about what it's like to become a mom in your fourth decade.

"A lot of people do it the other way around ... they get married [and] have a family in their youth," says Diaz."I'm kind of doing it in the second half of my life."

Keep reading Show less
News