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What went viral this week: Twins born 11 weeks apart + a viral father-daughter photoshoot

Summer is nearly over but there is still a lot of sunshine to be had if you look in the right places.

What went viral this week: Twins born 11 weeks apart + a viral father-daughter photoshoot

This is it mama, we have officially reached the end of August. Summer is nearly over but there is still a lot of sunshine to be had if you look in the right places.

Here are the headlines that made us smile this week:

This Disney princess was a hero to a special needs family 👏

As Today reports, mom Lauren Bergner's post about a Disney princess turning into a hero is going viral.

"I am so emotional with these pictures," Bergner captioned a series of photos she uploaded to Facebook.

The images show her son Brody, who has Autism, being comforted by Snow White while the family was visiting Disney and Epcot in Florida. The heat and the lines were getting to 6-year-old Brody and Snow White stepped up to help his mama out.

"It was our turn to take pictures with her and he wanted nothing to do with it," Bergner wrote.

She continues: "He was crying and was overwhelmed and just having a hard time. Snow White was amazing with him! She kissed, hugged and cuddled him. He was laying his head crying on her lap. She then took him for a walk away from the crowd! She was amazing. She held his hand, danced with him, took him over to a bench and sat with him. She went above and beyond!! She took so much time with him. She was a pure angel! She was magical and my family is forever thankful and touched!"

Because the characters never step out of character Bergner doesn't know this woman's real name, but she emailed Disney to let them know how amazing this theme park employee is.

Snow White, if you're reading this, we think you're pretty amazing, too.

This mama gave birth to two babies in just 11 weeks 

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A mom from Kazakhstan went viral this week after the world learned she'd given birth to two babies just 11 weeks apart!

The Kazakh Health Ministry posted the story on Facebook and it went viral from there.

As Women's Health explains, 29-year-old Liliya Konovalova has a a rare condition called uterus didelphys, or a double uterus, so her twins (a boy named Maxim and a girl named Liya) each had a private womb. That's why Maxim was able to stay inside for three months after his sister was born.

Liya was born on May 24 and Maxim hung in there until August 9, coming into the world weighing about three times what his big sister did.

Konovalova says her doctors basically performed a miracle and now the babies are about 6.6 pounds each and are getting ready to be discharged from the hospital!

Why this adorable Daddy-Daughter photo shoot went viral ❤️

Three weeks ago, proud dad Devante Bennett-Dotson and his adorable daughter Londyn, age 3, celebrated their birthdays. Londyn was a late birthday gift for Devante, coming into the world just one day after his birthday.

The bond between Devante and Londyn has always been special, People reported this week after the duo's birthday photoshoot went viral.

Londyn's mama, Ashleigh Sheppard, is a talented photographer and captured her "Daddy's girl" hanging out with her father in the driveway, where he loves to fix cars. The two dressed in matching overalls and did some work under Londyn's pink toy car. The whole family had fun during the shoot.

"In my free time I'm a mechanic and Londyn watches and tries helping with everything I do," Bennett-Dotson told People. "I was all for it and [the experience] made my day, especially seeing my little girl actually doing it and [being] into something that she watches me do."

This is seriously adorable and we love that this dad is teaching his daughter that she can do things that many see as traditionally male activities. It's 2019 and girls can fix cars with their dads, boys can do ballet, and millennial fathers are spending three times as much time with their kids as previous generations!

"If he's outside, she's outside. If he's under a car, she wants to be under a car," Londyn's mama told Good Morning America.

Happy birthday to this adorable duo!

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I felt lost as a new mother, but babywearing helped me find myself again

I wish someone had told me before how special wearing your baby can be, even when you have no idea how to do it.

My first baby and I were alone in our Brooklyn apartment during a particularly cold spring with yet another day of no plans. My husband was back at work after a mere three weeks of parental leave (what a joke!) and all my friends were busy with their childless lives—which kept them too busy to stop by or check in (making me, at times, feel jealous).

It was another day in which I would wait for baby to fall asleep for nap number one so I could shower and get ready to attempt to get out of the house together to do something, anything really, so I wouldn't feel the walls of the apartment close in on me by the time the second nap rolled around. I would pack all the diapers and toys and pacifiers and pump and bottles into a ginormous stroller that was already too heavy to push without a baby in it .

Then I would spend so much time figuring out where we could go with said stroller, because I wanted to avoid places with steps or narrow doors (I couldn't lift the stroller by myself and I was too embarrassed to ask strangers for help—also hi, New Yorkers, please help new moms when you see them huffing and puffing up the subway stairs, okay?). Then I would obsess about the weather, was it too cold to bring the baby out? And by the time I thought I had our adventure planned, the baby would wake up, I would still be in my PJs and it was time to pump yet again.

Slowly, but surely, and mostly thanks to sleep deprivation and isolation, I began to detest this whole new mom life. I've always been a social butterfly. I moved to New York because I craved that non-stop energy the city has and in the years before having my baby I amassed new friends I made through my daily adventures. I would never stop. I would walk everywhere just to take in the scenery and was always on the move.

Now I had this ball and chain attached to me, I thought, that didn't even allow me to make it out of the door to walk the dog. This sucks, I would think regularly, followed by maybe I'm not meant to be a mom after all.


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This is my one trick to get baby to sleep (and it always works!)

There's a reason why every mom tells you to buy a sound machine.

So in my defense, I grew up in Florida. As a child of the sunshine state, I knew I had to check for gators before sitting on the toilet, that cockroaches didn't just scurry, they actually flew, and at that point, the most popular and only sound machine I had ever heard of was the Miami Sound Machine.

I was raised on the notion that the rhythm was going to get me, not lull me into a peaceful slumber. Who knew?!

Well evidently science and, probably, Gloria Estefan knew, but I digress.

When my son was born, I just assumed the kid would know how to sleep. When I'm tired that's what I do, so why wouldn't this smaller more easily exhausted version of me not work the same way? Well, the simple and cinematic answer is, he is not in Kansas anymore.

Being in utero is like being in a warm, soothing and squishy spa. It's cozy, it's secure, it comes with its own soundtrack. Then one day the spa is gone. The space is bigger, brighter and the constant stream of music has come to an abrupt end. Your baby just needs a little time to acclimate and a little assist from continuous sound support.

My son, like most babies, was a restless and active sleeper. It didn't take much to jolt him from a sound sleep to crying like a banshee. I once microwaved a piece of pizza, and you would have thought I let 50 Rockettes into his room to perform a kick line.

I was literally walking on eggshells, tiptoeing around the house, watching the television with the closed caption on.

Like adults, babies have an internal clock. Unlike adults, babies haven't harnessed the ability to hit the snooze button on that internal clock. Lucky for babies they have a great Mama to hit the snooze button for them.

Enter the beloved by all—sound machines.

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It's science: Why your baby stops crying when you stand up

A fascinating study explains why.

When your baby is crying, it feels nearly instinctual to stand up to rock, sway and soothe them. That's because standing up to calm babies is instinctual—driven by centuries of positive feedback from calmed babies, researchers have found.

"Infants under 6 months of age carried by a walking mother immediately stopped voluntary movement and crying and exhibited a rapid heart rate decrease, compared with holding by a sitting mother," say authors of a 2013 study published in Current Biology.

Even more striking: This coordinated set of actions—the mother standing and the baby calming—is observed in other mammal species, too. Using pharmacologic and genetic interventions with mice, the authors say, "We identified strikingly similar responses in mouse pups as defined by immobility and diminished ultrasonic vocalizations and heart rate."

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