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[Editor's note: Motherly is committed to covering all relevant presidential candidate plans as we approach the 2020 election. We are making efforts to get information from all candidates. Motherly does not endorse any political party or candidate. We stand with and for mothers and advocate for solutions that will reduce maternal stress and benefit women, families and the country.]

When the race began, it was a crowded fieldโ€”but the closer we get to 2020, fewer and fewer Democratic candidates remain in the race for the presidency. Exits of once high-profile candidates, including Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris and Andrew Yang have narrowed the field, and in a month that's already seen one debate, the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary, Democrats are prepping for two more debates.

The next two debates are scheduled for February 19 in Las Vegas and February 25 in Charleston.

So where do the candidates stand on issues of importance to parents? We're keeping track of the plans they're putting forth and how they could impact your family.

Here are the candidates, in no particular order:

Elizabeth Warren

Elizabeth Warren

Paid leave: Wants to see "at least 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave" as noted in her Green Manufacturing Plan.

Childcare costs: Warren plans to introduce Universal Child Care as a right for every child in America. The plan would see the federal government partner with states, municipalities, school districts, nonprofits, tribes and faith-based organizations "to create a network of child care options that would be available to every family."

Health care: Warren is down for Medicare for All, and wants every person in America to have full health care coverage without any middle class tax increase.

Joe Biden

Joe Biden

Paid leave: Biden has not made a statement about a specific plan or number of weeks he wants to see for paid family leave.

Childcare costs: Biden plans to "provide high-quality, universal pre-kindergarten for all three- and four-year-olds."

Health care: Biden plans to build on the Affordable Care Act to offer an affordable public option to American families.

Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders

Paid leave: Sanders co-sponsored The FAMILY Act to give workers at least 12 weeks of universal paid family and medical leave.

Childcare costs: Sanders has stated he is in favor of universal childcare. "We have a dysfunctional childcare system in this country, which is too expensive for parents, while providers are paid totally inadequate wages. We need to do what other countries around the world doโ€”develop a high quality universal childcare program," he tweeted.

Health care: As noted on his website, Sanders plans to "create a Medicare for All, single-payer, national health insurance program to provide everyone in America with comprehensive health care coverage, free at the point of service."

Pete Buttigieg

Pete Buttigieg

Paid leave: Buttigieg supports the FAMILY Act and wants to see 12 weeks of paid leave.

Childcare costs: Promising a "comprehensive child care plan will make high-quality child care free for families most in need, and affordable for all."

Health care: His plan is called Medicare for All Who Want It. As explained on his website, under this plan "everyone will be able to opt in to an affordable, comprehensive public alternative. This affordable public plan will incentivize private insurers to compete on price and bring down costs. If private insurers are not able to offer something dramatically better, this public plan will create a natural glide-path to Medicare for All."

Amy Klobuchar

Amy Klobuchar

Paid leave: Her plans to support workers include: "garanteeing up to 12 weeks of paid family leave and allowing workers to earn paid sick leave."

Childcare costs: Worked with Republican Dan Sullivan to introduced the the Child Care Workforce and Facilities Act, "to bring the cost of child care down and provide more child care centers in areas that need them the most."

Health care: On her website she states she: supports universal health care for all Americans, and she believes the quickest way to get there is through a public option that expands Medicare or Medicaid. She supports changes to the Affordable Care Act to help bring down costs to consumers including providing cost-sharing reductions, making it easier for states to put reinsurance in place, and continuing to implement delivery system reform

Tulsi Gabbard

Tulsi Gabbard

Paid leave: Like many of her fellow candidates, Gabbard supports The Family Act. which would see parents get 12 weeks of leave.

Child care costs: Plans unclear.

Health care: Gabbard "supports the Medicare for All Act and serves on the Medicare for All Caucus".

Tom Steyer

Tom Steyer

Paid leave: Plans unclear.

Child care costs: Plans unclear.

Health care: Plans to "create a competitive public option to drive down costs, expand coverage, and deliver quality care to everyone who lives here, including the undocumented community," according to his website.

Mike Bloomberg

Paid leave: Supports 12 weeks of paid family leave, according to The Washington Post.

Child care cost: Plans to "increase the Child Tax Credit, make it fully refundable, and phase it in faster, starting with the first dollar of earnings."

Health care: According to his website, Bloomberg plans to "create a Medicare-like public option" and "build on the Affordable Care Act."

[A version of this post was originally published November 20, 2019. It has been updated.]

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