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Who says romance is dead? Science shows there’s a baby boom after Valentine’s Day

I’m just going to lay it out there: My son was born on Nov. 12. My daughter was due on Nov. 11 (but decided to come early). My own birthday is Nov. 14—exactly nine months after Valentine’s Day. Clearly people in my family are more into the holiday than I’ve let on. ?

It seems we’re not the only ones.

According to 2015 data from England’s National Health Service, some 16,263 babies were conceived during the week of Valentine’s Day. That’s up a full 6% from the average during other weeks. In fact, the only time the spike is higher is during the week of Christmas. (Which explains why September is the most popular birth month.)

This week is almost over, but surveys name Friday, Saturday and Sunday as the most popular days of the week for baby making, so there is still time to participate in this short-lived baby boom before it ends.

According to the NHS figures, the conception rates hit a year-long low just two weeks after Valentine’s Day.

Until then, soak up this time with your sweetie.

“Love is most definitely in the air at this time of year,” Sarah-Jane Marsh, Chair of the Maternity Transformation Programme at NHS England, tells the Telegraph. “It is fantastic to learn that the NHS sees a mini-baby boom nine months later, bringing with it great joy to families across the nation.”

That’s certainly been true for my family—although we now know to be *extra* careful this time of year if we aren’t planning to welcome another November baby.

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