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The season of family vacations, cross-country road trips, and Independence Day celebrations is here. Read your way around the United States with these books from the 50 states and the nation’s capital.


Alabama

Rosa

by Nikki Giovanni, Illustrated by Bryan Collier

Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her seat on a city bus sparks the Montgomery bus boycott.

Alaska

The Salmon Princess: An Alaska Cinderella Story

by Mindy Dwyer

With a boot for a glass slipper and an eagle spirit for a fairy godmother, this classic tale is set in a southeastern Alaska village.

Arizona

Mule Train Mail

by Craig Brown

Anthony Paya leads mail-carrying mules to the Supai post office at the bottom of the Grand Canyon in this nonfiction narrative.

Arkansas

Fiddlin’ Sam

by Marianna Dengler, Illustrated by Sibyl Graber Gerig

In this family memoir, a fiddler travels the Ozarks playing music and looking to pass his talents on to the next generation.

California

Separate is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation

by Duncan Tonatiuh

Sylvia Mendez’s family fights for her right to attend a local school, and in doing so, desegregates schools across California.

Colorado

Grandfather’s Christmas Tree

by Keith Strand, Illustrated by Thomas Locker

A grandfather explains how his parents’ settling in Colorado in 1886 led to family Christmas traditions that continued for generations.

Connecticut

Snowflakes Fall

by Patricia MacLachlan, Illustrated by Steven Kellogg

A tribute to the victims of the Sandy Hook shooting in Newtown is told through a story of falling snow that could just as easily be about the changing seasons as it is about loss and renewal.

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Delaware

No Kite in Sight: A Delaware Beaches Mystery

by Denise Blum, Illustrated by Nathan Rea

A brother and sister travel Delaware beaches in search of their missing kite.

Florida

Bigmama’s

by Donald Crews

Donald Crews writes an account of childhood visits to his grandparents’ farm in Cottondale.

Georgia

Here Come the Girl Scouts!: The Amazing All-True Story of Juliette ‘Daisy’ Gordon Low and Her Great Adventure

by Shana Corey, Illustrated by Hadley Hooper

This biography details Juliette Gordon Low’s upbringing in Victorian era Savannah and her eventual founding of the Girl Scouts.

Hawaii

Too Many Mangos

by Tammy Paikai, Illustrated by Don Robinson

Kama and Nani share mangos from their grandfather’s tree with the neighbors, and each neighbor shares something in return.

Idaho

P Is for Potato: An Idaho Alphabet

by Stan and Joy Steiner, Illustrated by Jocelyn Slack

This rhyming book teaches the alphabet through the culture and landscape of Idaho.

Illinois

Murphy’s Ticket: The Goofy Start and Glorious End of the Chicago Cubs Billy Goat Curse

by Brad Herzog, Illustrated by David Leonard (forthcoming July 2017)

A goat is kicked out of a 1945 World Series game at Wrigley Field, and an ensuing curse is blamed for the Cubs’ mishaps for decades, until their 2016 World Series win.

Indiana

Casper and Catherine Move to America: An Immigrant Family’s Adventures 1849-1850

by Brian Hasler, Illustrated by Angela M. Gouge

A family emigrates from Switzerland to Southern Indiana in the mid 1800s.

Iowa

Tomás and the Library Lady

by Pat Mora, Illustrated by Raul Colón

Based on the life of writer Tomás Rivera, Tomás travels to Iowa for his parents’ migrant farm work and falls in love with the local public library.

Kansas

Aunt Minnie and the Twister

by Mary Skillings Prigger, Illustrated by Betsy Lewin

When a tornado strikes, Aunt Minnie and her nine adopted nieces and nephews use their damaged farmhouse as an excuse to build a much needed addition.

Kentucky

The Last Black King of the Kentucky Derby

by Crystal Hubbard, Illustrated by Robert McGuire

Jimmy Winkfield, who grew up in an 1880s sharecropping family, goes from a child who loves horses to winner of the Kentucky Derby.

Louisiana

The Story of Ruby Bridges

by Robert Coles, Illustrated by George Ford

This biography details Ruby Bridges’ experiences as one of the first black children to integrate into a white school in New Orleans.

Maine

The Wicked Big Toddlah

by Kevin Hawkes

A giant baby gets into even bigger trouble in this humorous tale set in the woods of Maine.

Maryland

Beddy Bye in the Bay

by Priscilla Cummings, Illustrated by Mary Dunn Ramsey

A rhyming bedtime story explains how and where various Chesapeake Bay creatures sleep.

Massachusetts

Dear Mr. Blueberry

by Simon James

It’s summer in Nantucket, and Emily and her teacher exchange letters concerning a whale Emily insists is living in her pond.

Michigan

Mail by the Pail

by Colin Bergel and illustrated by Mark Koenig

Mary sends her father – a sailor on a freighter in Lake Michigan – a birthday card, highlighting how mail is delivered on the Great Lakes.

Minnesota

Mississippi Going North

by Sanna Anderson Baker, Illustrated by Bill Farnsworth

A family canoes the Mississippi River in northern Minnesota, enjoying the beauty of nature.

Mississippi

Freedom School, Yes!

by Amy Littlesugar, Illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Told from the perspective of a brave young girl is a fictionalized account of the Mississippi Freedom School Summer Project in 1964.

Missouri

Stand Straight, Ella Kate: The True Story of a Real Giant

by Kate Klise, Illustrated by M. Sarah Klise

Born in rural Missouri in 1872, Ella Kate Ewing grows to be eight feet, four inches tall and learns to accept her height and use it to her advantage.

Montana

Bug Feats of Montana

by Deborah Richie Oberbillig, Illustrated by Robert Rath

This informational book details Montana’s weirdest and most fascinating bugs.

Nebraska

The Huckabuck Family: and How They Raised Popcorn in Nebraska and Quit and Came Back

by Carl Sandburg, Illustrated by David Small

After a popcorn farming disaster in Nebraska, the Huckabucks head elsewhere until a sign from a squash prompts their return.

Nevada

Rhyolite: The True Story of a Ghost Town

by Diane Siebert, Illustrated by David Frampton

Told in rhyming verse, Rhyolite, a once booming gold mining town, falls as quickly as it rose.

New Hampshire

Ox-Cart Man

by Donald Hall, Illustrated by Barbara Cooney

A 19th-century farmer travels to Portsmouth to sell the goods his family produced that year and buy things for the year to come.

New Jersey

Flotsam

by David Wiesner

A boy discovers creatures and treasures at the beach in this wordless picture book inspired by the author’s childhood summers at the Jersey shore.

New Mexico

How Chile Came to New Mexico

by Rudolfo Anaya, Illustrated by Nicolás Otero, Translated by Nasario Garcia

This bilingual book explains how Native Americans brought chile to New Mexico.

New York

Tar Beach

by Faith Ringgold

Cassie Louise Lightfoot imagines taking flight off of her Harlem apartment roof and soaring over landmarks of historical and personal significance.

North Carolina

The Sunday Outing

by Gloria Jean Pinkney, Illustrated by Jerry Pinkney

Ernestine loves watching the trains on their way to and from North Carolina, and with sacrifice and her family’s help, she gets to ride the train, too.

North Dakota

A Boy Called Slow

by Joseph Bruchac, Illustrated by Rocco Baviera

A Lakota Sioux boy, named Slow after his unhurried nature, earns the new name Sitting Bull through an act of bravery.

Ohio

Lentil

by Robert McCloskey

Set in the fictional town of Alto, Lentil uses his harmonica to save the parade from Old Sneep, the town grump.

Oklahoma

They Came from the Bronx: How the Buffalo Were Saved from Extinction

by Neil Waldman

White men wiped out the buffalo Comanche people depended on, but in 1905, the Bronx Zoo sends their own buffalo to repopulate the region.

Oregon

Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains

by Deborah Hopkinson, Illustrated by Nancy Carpenter

Though more about the journey to get there than the state itself, this is a tall tale of a father and his family bringing fruit trees by wagon to Portland for that “sweet Oregon dirt.”

Pennsylvania

Saving the Liberty Bell

by Megan McDonald, Illustrated by Marsha Gray Carrington

John Jacob Mickley and his father help save the Liberty Bell from British soldiers during the American Revolution.

Rhode Island

Finding Providence: The Story of Roger Williams

by Avi, Illustrated by James Watling

Roger Williams, on trial in Massachusetts for advocating religious freedom, flees into the wilderness with help from Native Americans and eventually founds Rhode Island.

South Carolina

Circle Unbroken

by Margot Theis Raven, Illustrated by E.B. Lewis

A girl’s grandmother teaches her about the art of basket weaving and its historical roots.

South Dakota

Lakota Hoop Dancer

by Jacqueline Left Hand Bull and Suzanne Haldane, Photographs by Suzanne Haldane

Kevin Locke travels from the Standing Rock Reservation to perform the Lakota hoop dance around the world.

Tennessee

The Quickest Kid in Clarksville

by Pat Zietlow Miller, Illustrated by Frank Morrison

Alta and Charmaine fight over who is faster, but they come together to make it to the parade on time to see Wilma Rudolph.

Texas

The Legend of the Bluebonnet: An Old Tale of Texas

Retold and Illustrated by Tomie dePaola

When drought threatens the Comanche, a young girl makes a sacrifice to help her community.

Utah

Dinosaur Mountain: Digging into the Jurassic Age

by Deborah Kogan Ray

In 1908, Earl Douglass sets out for the Uinta Basin to find fossils and become one of the best “dinosaur hunters” of his time.

Vermont

Snowflake Bentley

by Jacqueline Briggs Martin, Illustrated by Mary Azarian

Wilson Bentley, born in Jericho in 1865, develops a method for photographing snowflakes.

Virginia

I Took a Walk

by Henry Cole

Inspired by the author’s Loudoun County childhood, a boy wanders meadows and woods spotting various creatures.

Washington

Elliot the Otter: The Totally Untrue Story of Elliot, Boss of the Bay

by John Skewes and Eric Ode, Illustrated by John Skewes

Elliot the Otter is convinced he is in charge of all the action in Puget Sound’s Elliot Bay.

Washington, D.C.

Gordon Parks: How the Photographer Captured White and Black America

by Carole Boston Weatherford, Illustrated by Jamey Christoph

While Gordon Parks lived in many places and excelled in many fields, this biography focuses on his work as a photographer documenting racial injustice in Washington, D.C.

West Virginia

John Denver’s Take Me Home, Country Roads

Adapted by Christopher Canyon

In this adaptation of John Denver’s famous song, various vehicles traveling along Appalachian backdrops arrive at a family reunion.

Wisconsin

Mai Ya’s Long Journey

by Sheila Cohen

Mai Ya journeys from a refugee camp in Thailand to Madison where she must balance her Hmong heritage and American life.

Wyoming

When Esther Morris Headed West: Women, Wyoming, and the Right to Vote

by Connie Nordhielm Wooldridge, Illustrated by Jacqueline Rogers

After Wyoming passes a bill allowing women to vote and hold public office, Esther Morris becomes the first female judge in the United States.

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There are certain moments of parenthood that stay with us forever. The ones that feel a little extra special than the rest. The ones that we always remember, even as time moves forward.

The first day of school will always be one of the most powerful of these experiences.

I love thinking back to my own excitement going through it as a child—the smell of the changing seasons, how excited I was about the new trendy outfit I picked out. And now, I get the joy of watching my children go through the same right of passage.

Keep the memory of this time close with these 10 pictures that you must take on the first day of school so you can remember it forever, mama:

1. Getting on the school bus.

Is there anything more iconic than a school bus when it comes to the first day of school? If your little one is taking the bus, snap a photo of them posed in front of the school bus, walking onto it for the first time, or waving at you through the window as they head off to new adventure.

2. Their feet (and new shoes!)

Getting a new pair of shoes is the quintessential task to prepare for a new school year. These are the shoes that will support them as they learn, play and thrive. Capture the sentimental power of this milestone by taking photos of their shoes. You can get a closeup of your child's feet, or even show them standing next to their previous years of first-day-of-school shoes to show just how much they've grown. If you have multiple children, don't forget to get group shoe photos as well!

3. Posing with their backpack.

Backpacks are a matter of pride for kids so be sure to commemorate the one your child has chosen for the year. Want to get creative? Snap a picture of the backpack leaning against the front door, and then on your child's back as they head out the door.

4. Standing next to a tree or your front door.

Find a place where you can consistently take a photo year after year—a tree, your front door, the school signage—and showcase how much your child is growing by documenting the change each September.

5. Holding a 'first day of school' sign.

Add words to your photo by having your child pose with or next to a sign. Whether it's a creative DIY masterpiece or a simple printout you find online that details their favorites from that year, the beautiful sentiment will be remembered for a lifetime.

6. With their graduating class shirt.

When your child starts school, get a custom-designed shirt with the year your child will graduate high school, or design one yourself with fabric paint (in an 18-year-old size). Have them wear the shirt each year so you can watch them grow into it—and themselves!

Pro tip: Choose a simple color scheme and design that would be easy to recreate if necessary—if your child ends up skipping or repeating a year of school and their graduation date shifts, you can have a new shirt made that can be easily swapped for the original.

7. Post with sidewalk chalk.

Sidewalk chalk never goes out of style and has such a nostalgic quality to it. Let your child draw or write something that represents the start of school, like the date or their teacher, and then have them pose next to (or on top of) their work.

8. In their classroom.

From first letters learned to complicated math concepts mastered, your child's classroom is where the real magic of school happens. Take a few pictures of the space where they'll be spending their time. They will love remembering what everything looked like on the first day, from the decorations on the wall to your child's cubby, locker or desk.

9. With their teacher.

If classrooms are where the magic happens, teachers are the magicians. We wish we remembered every single teach we had, but the truth is that over time, memories fade. Be sure to snap a photo of your child posing with their teacher on the first day of school.

10. With you!

We spend so much time thinking about our children's experience on the first day of school, we forget about the people who have done so much to get them there—us! This is a really big day for you too, mama, so get in that photo! You and your child will treasure it forever.

This article is sponsored by Rack Room Shoes. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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A recent trip to the movie theater had me brimming with excitement to reunite with Woody, Buzz, and the crew of Andy's (er, Bonnie's?) toys in the Toy Story franchise's new installment. Sure enough, my family laughed at the adventures of the cast, but it was a newcomer to the gang that really stole the show: a plastic spork named Forky.

While his reluctance to accept his place was charming and sweet, Bonnie's creation of Forky, and her subsequent attachment to him as her new favorite toy, points at a bigger picture—what constitutes a toy? Likewise, what does a child really need to be entertained?

The film's inclusion of such a common, utilitarian object as a chosen plaything serves as a reminder that children's imaginations are a powerful thing, and—when left to their own devices—kids are quite capable of having fun with far less than our society typically deems necessary.

Forky is a throwback to a time when less was more, and when families' homes weren't miniature toy stores.

I remember recently being spellbound as I watched my daughter engrossed in play with a handful of rocks. Each pebble had its role—mommy rock, daddy rock, baby rock, etc—and she carried on with a captivating scene encompassing equal parts comedy and tragedy. It was a rock family saga, and frankly, I was mesmerized.

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Despite a house full of flashy, modern, (and sometimes expensive) toys, I've found that some of the most creative play comes from the most unexpected "things" that most adults would consider non-toys. Kids have a unique way of looking at things, and often the items they gravitate toward as their preferred toy may leave parents not only scratching their heads, but also howling in laughter.

Kitchen accessories seem to be a favorite for many little ones, as I remember my own niece insisting on carrying a serving spoon everywhere with her. These inanimate objects function as the perfect plaything for children, as their minds are free to create whatever story or fantasy they desire. The make-believe is endless.

Other favorites for my kiddos include shoelaces, ropes, or yarn, which have infinite aliases—stuffed animal leashes and zip-lines being their go-tos. And who can forget the magic of cardboard boxes and of course bubble wrap. We're talking hours of fun and play.

After watching the film, I looked around my house at the abundant number of toys that my own children possess. Then I turned around and watched as they chose to stack Tupperware containers and throw foam koozies at them in a competitive game of kitchen bowling.

So yeah, we're all probably a little guilty of overindulgence with it comes to our kids. To be honest, it's fun to watch their eyes light up upon receiving a new toy at their birthday or other holiday. And I'm not arguing that those practices need to change completely. Rather, let's not forget the power of minimalism and its place in our lives. Let's encourage resourcefulness and creativity.

Behind the fun and nostalgia of the Toy Story series are important lessons and messages. In today's culture where more is more, Forky is a reminder that parents don't necessarily have to break the bank in purchasing toys for the little ones in our lives. In many cases, a "spork" will do.

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Life

School will be here before we know it, mamas. Which means it's time to take a look in your kid's closet, pull out all those leggings and jeans with holes in the knees and replace them with durable, super cute options... today! Why? Because Prime Day, that's why!

We've been lucky enough to try out Amazon's Spotted Zebra and Look by Crewcuts, and trust us when we say these clothes are quality with a capital "Q." And at these prices, you just might want to stock up on multiple seasons' worth!

From sneakers and sweatshirts to shorts and hoodies, these are the cutest staples at the best prices that you want to take advantage of today!

Amazon Essentials Girls' Long-Sleeve Elastic Waist T-Shirt Dress

Amazon Essentials Dress

Available in seven colorways and sizes 2T to XXL, this dress is the perfect transition piece from summer to fall...just add leggings and she can rock it all winter long, too.

Price: $10.50 (regularly $15.00)

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Spotted Zebra Girls' Toddler & Kids 4-Pack Leggings

Spotted Zebra Legging

Mamas, listen up: We've tried out leggings from many retailers and Spotted Zebra's are among the best. And they come in 18 different patterns/sets.

Price: $10 (regularly $20)

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LOOK by crewcuts Boys' 2-Pack Knit Pull on Shorts

Look Crewcuts Knit Shorts

Cozy shorts for little boys to run around in are imperative for the school year and these ones fit the bill perfectly.

Price: $16.80 (regularly $24)

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Spotted Zebra Kids' 12-Pack Low-Cut Socks

Spotted Zebra Socks

Mamas, if you've got school-age children, then you've also probably got a bin full of random socks. At a buck a pair, this set is well worth it.

Price: $12.60 (regularly $18.00)

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Crocs Kids Bayaband Clog

Crocs Bayaband Clog

No mom has ever regretted buying Crocs for her kids! The easiest shoe to slip on and off chubby feet, Crocs' big rubber toes make them for great scootering and biking.

Price: $18.99 (regularly $34)

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Simple Joys by Carter's Boys' 2-Pack Flat Front Shorts

Carters Shorts

For the days when you want him to look a bit crisper, this two-pack of flat-front chino-esque shorts will do nicely.

Price: $16.75 (regularly $23.99)

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Spotted Zebra Boys' 2-Pack Light-Weight Hooded Long-Sleeve T-Shirts

spotted zebra

You can never have too many lightweight long-sleeve shirts for your kids, and we love the hoods and patterns/colors on these.

Price: $15.40 (regularly $22.50)

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PUMA Kids' St Runner Velcro Sneaker

Puma Velcro Sneaker

Available in 12 colors for girls and boys, these sneakers are perfect for pre-K and young elementary school kids who haven't quite learned how to tie their own laces yet.

Price: $17.49 (regularly $40)

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LOOK by crewcuts Girls' Lightweight Cat-ear Hoodie

Look Crewcuts Cat Hoodie

This hoodie is going to be their new fave when the school year rolls around.

Price: $18.20 (regularly $26)

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Spotted Zebra Girls' Toddler & Kids 2-Pack Knit Sleeveless Tiered Dresses

Spotted Zebra Dress

Even if your girl is going through a no-dresses phase, we're pretty sure she'll love this for two reasons. One, it's SO twirly, whirly, perfect for spinning around (and around and around). And two, she's going to love the bright blocked colors.

Price: $16.80 (regularly $26.80)

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Starter Boys' Pullover Logo Hoodie

starter hoodie

Perfect for throwing on after a baseball game or on the walk to school when the temps start dipping again.

Price: $13.94 (regularly $19.99)

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UOVO Boys Running Shoes

Uovo Boys Running Shoe

UOVO's running shoes are about as durable as they come thanks to rubberized finishes that mean you can wipe stains (grass! mud!) right off. Also available in orange at this price.

Price: $23.64 (regularly $42.99)

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Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

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[Editor's note: This article describes one parent's experience with bed-sharing. To learn more about the American Academy of Pediatrics safe sleep recommendations please visit the AAP.]

Raise your hand if you've ever found yourself asleep with your child next to you in bed. (🙋🏽♀️)While the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends room-sharing, they discourage bed-sharing, particularly in the first four months of a baby's life, due to safety concerns.

But the reality is that many parents fall asleep with their babies next to them in bed. Whether it's because your baby won't sleep without those cuddles, because you've drifted off while nursing, because you didn't have the heart to put a sick baby in their crib, or because your doctor has given you the okay to snooze alongside your babe, bed-sharing is very much a thing.

And Tia Mowry is getting real about her experience with it.

When asked about her most "non-traditional" parenting move, Tia shared that she's a big-time bed-sharer. "My 1-year-old [daughter, Cairo] is still in my bed," the actress said during an interview with PEOPLE. "Ever since she was born she was always in our bed." But this isn't her first experience with co-sleeping: Tia also shared that she slept with her son until he was 4 years old.

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Tia is hardly alone when it comes to sleeping with her kids. A 2016 study found that only about 44% of survey responders never slept with their babies in bed with them—and that those who slept with their babies were more likely to keep breastfeeding for the recommended six months. Fellow celeb Kourtney Kardashian is a co-sleeper, and many mamas find that while they didn't plan to co-sleep, it is what works for them. That's why there are even special co-sleeping beds big enough for parents and kids.

But as popular as co-sleeping is, it can still be seen as controversial. Even Tia's own mom isn't on board with the Sister Sister star's decision to bed-share with her kids. "[My mom is] like, 'You need to do the cry-out method. Put your baby in the crib. And I'm like, 'No!' I don't want my baby to have any sign of stress whatsoever," Tia explains.

Whichever side of the line you fall on, one thing is clear: Sometimes parents need to do things they never expected to do in the name of more sleep. When it comes to parenting, there's only one absolute: You have to do what keeps your family safe, healthy and happy. And while we'd urge all mamas to familiarize themselves with child safety guidelines, ultimately we all have to make the choices that are best for our families.

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News

If you're not familiar with Hanna Andersson, let me fill you in. This brand is the mothership when it comes to quality organic kids' clothing. Started more than 30 years ago by a couple in Portland, Oregon, founders Gun and Tom Denhart (she's Swedish, he's American) set out to make highly-durable, supremely-soft basics and pajamas for children, all of which are OEKO-TEX-certified.

As a mom to four kids, hand-me-downs are king in my household. Many a time I have shelled out for cheap stuff, but when it can't last for more than one child's use, it's simply not worth the investment. Which is why I'm a huge devotee of Hanna A. Five years ago, I splurged on the famous Christmas pajamas for the whole family and I'm not lying when I say that after hundreds of times through the washer and dryer, my baby will be the fourth kid rocking the 3T sleeper this holiday season. No rips, no shredded seams. Still 100% intact and soft and thick. But all that quality comes at a price—one pair of pajamas costs between $38 and $45.

Which is why I nearly did a backflip when I saw that Amazon was launching an exclusive collection dubbed Moon and Back by Hanna Andersson, chock full of the pajamas I've come to love so much, albeit at a much lower price!

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Available in a slew of adorable patterns (Stripes! Stars!), really all I wanted to know was if the quality was the same. After all, a sleeper on Hanna Andersson will run you $38, but Moon and Back is offering a nearly-identical one for $17.50 today on Prime Day. That's less than half the price, mamas.

After multiple wears and washes, I'm here to say that Amazon's promise of hand-me-down quality holds true. Made from a similar soft, OEKO-TEX-certified organic cotton, the items I tested (er, my kiddos tested lol), featured the same design details I so appreciate—like a knee-to-neck zipper, smooth flat-lock seams and foldover sleeve cuffs.

The best part is that as of today—Prime Day!—the entire collection is now officially available in sizes newborn to 5T, and the pajamas are all 30 percent off!

Moon and Back by Hanna Andersson One-Piece Organic Cotton Footless Pajamas

Sale price: $17.50 (Regularly $25)

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Moon and Back by Hanna Andersson Two-Piece Organic Cotton Pajama Set

Sale price: $17.50 (Regularly $25)

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Moon and Back by Hanna Andersson One-Piece Organic Cotton Footed Pajama

Sale price: $17.50 (Regularly $25)

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Moon and Back by Hanna Andersson 3-Pack Organic Cotton Long Sleeve Bodysuit

Price: $35

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Moon and Back by Hanna Andersson 3-Pack Organic Cotton Legging

Price: $33

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Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

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