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A teenage pregnancy prevention program involving a baby simulator does not appear to have any long-term effect on reducing the risk of teenage pregnancy, according to the first randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of this intervention, published in The Lancet. In fact, the study found that teenage girls who took part were more, not less, likely to become pregnant compared to girls who did not take part. Similar programs are reportedly delivered in 89 countries, and the authors of this Australian trial warn that the intervention is likely to be an ineffective use of public funds to prevent teenage pregnancy.

Source: Baby simulator program may make teenage girls more, not less, likely to become pregnant — ScienceDaily

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