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What You Need to Know About Overheating Before Hitting the Friendly Skies with Your Baby

On June 22nd, Emily France of Superior, Colorado, feared her overheated four-month-old baby would die in her arms while they waited to evacuate a United Airlines flight at Denver International Airport. By the time an ambulance rushed Owen away, the plane had been sitting on the tarmac for over two hours. Though crew members allowed France to come to the front of the plane and hold her son in front of the open door while they brought bags of ice, Owen was struggling with the heat. It was an unusually warm day, with temperatures in the 90’s.


France said, “His whole body flashed red and his eyes rolled back in his head and he was screaming. And then he went limp in my arms. It was the worst moment of my life.”

After the paramedics were called, another thirty minutes passed before Owen finally left by ambulance. Owen is now home and healthy. In a statement, United apologized and said they are taking steps to find out how this happened in order to prevent future occurrences.

While this situation may find many parents thinking twice before flying with little ones, it’s important to consider the facts before calling off your summer air travel plans.

Overheating happens when the rising temperature of your body outpaces its ability to regulate itself or to cool itself down. Overheating can lead to heat stroke, which is potentially fatal. Babies are especially vulnerable to heat stroke because their nervous systems, responsible for temperature regulation, are not yet mature. Physician and mother of three, Ivy Pointer, M.D., who works in the pediatric intensive care unit at Wake Med in North Carolina, explains why.

From a physiology standpoint, [babies and children] have a higher metabolic rate, meaning that they physically create more heat per kilogram of body weight. They have higher heat absorption due to the fact that they have a higher surface area to mass ratio. And they have a lower rate of sweating.

According to Florida physician and mother Micheyle Goldman, D.O., M.P.H., medical director of the pediatric emergency department at Memorial Hospital West, though heat cramps and heat exhaustion are common in the summer months, heat stroke, which is the most severe form of heat illness, is relatively rare. Goldman says that though young children and infants, in particular, are at higher risk, heat-related illnesses are more commonly seen in adolescent athletes who do not hydrate adequately.

Both Goldman and Pointer noted most infants who come to the hospital with heat-related illnesses were left in cars. Says Pointer, “Even on days which do not seem extraordinarily hot, the car can heat up quickly resulting in an infant’s death.”

Risk Factors

Babies are vulnerable to overheating when they are:

  • Exposed to a hot environment. This is especially true when there hasn’t been a chance to acclimate (i.e., during a heat wave, on vacation in a warmer climate, at the beginning of the summer).
  • Overdressed. According to the National Institutes of Health, SIDS is more likely to occur in the winter months than during the warmer months. It’s during the winter when caregivers are more likely to bundle babies in more blankets and layers than are necessary. Instead, babies should sleep in light clothing in a room set to a temperature an adult would find comfortable.
  • Dehydrated. Pointer recommends parents watch for fewer wet diapers, dry mouth, and a lack of tears.

Signs and Symptoms

Unfortunately, your baby can’t tell you she’d like to take her hat off or that she’s feeling parched. Fortunately, there are non-verbal cues you can pick up on.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion, which is milder than heat stroke, include:

  • Increased thirst.
  • Dehydration.
  • Drowsiness.
  • Skin that is cool and moist to the touch.

Symptoms of heat stroke include:

  • A temperature of 103F, but the baby is not sweating.
  • Hot, red, dry skin.
  • Increased pulse rate. (Pointer advises parents to remember that an infant’s normal heart rate can be up to 150-160 beats per minute, depending on the age.)
  • Rapid, shallow breathing.
  • Vomiting.
  • Lethargy. Unlike a baby who is just sleepy, a lethargic baby may not rouse when you call his name, tickle him, or rub his back or chest in an attempt to wake him.
  • Loss of consciousness.

Care

If your baby is overheating, but the symptoms aren’t severe enough to warrant emergency medical care,

  • Offer your baby fluids. Experts recommend babies under four months old drink breastmilk and/or formula, as opposed to water.
  • Get your baby into a cooler environment. If you’re outside, go inside to an air-conditioned place, or find a shady spot if indoor shelter isn’t available.
  • Give your baby a bath in cool water.
  • If symptoms do not improve or if they worsen, seek medical care.

Prevention

According to Goldman, it’s vital to be prepared for overheating when flying. She advises parents to:

  • Bring extra fluids for your kiddos in case the airline doesn’t have the beverage your child will drink.
  • Travel in lightweight clothing.
  • Bring a small, battery operated fan. On an upcoming flight with her eight-year-old, Goldman said she plans to bring a battery operated misting fan.

When most of us fly with an infant, our biggest concerns are that they’ll have a blow-out or an earache. The fact that they might overheat during a delay doesn’t enter our minds. While the recent United incident is certainly not the norm – Goldman says she’s never seen or heard of anything like it in over a decade of working in emergency pediatric medicine – it’s something to be prepared for.

Says Pointer, “I can understand how boarding a plane with an infant, already an anxiety-provoking moment, could be even scarier now, but I think moms can make sure they prepare by bringing plenty of fluids (either for themselves if breastfeeding or for their infant) and layers of clothing for their infant. I hope that the airlines will also be more cognizant of specific needs of an infant and adjust protocols accordingly.”

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Burnout is something we all experience and stress from your finances may play a major part in that. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to combat financial fatigue and finally feel like you're in a positive relationship with your money.

Here are a few tips that will help to reduce your money stress—to ensure that you're equipped with an actionable plan to take control of your finances and finally meet your money goals.

1. Know where you stand

The best way to counteract getting overwhelmed is getting organized. First thing's first: rip off the band-aid, look at how much your household has spent (and on what). Spend time checking your bills and looking at your bank account balance and credit statements to get a clear picture of where your finances are at.

2. Adjust your budget

Rewrite your budget to fit your current reality. Budgeting can help you see where you can cut unnecessary expenses and increase flexibility in your family's choices down the line. If you have to tighten your belt for the first month or so of the year to ensure you're paying back your holiday debts, so be it.

If budgeting feels overwhelming, start with an app that can simplify it. Mint, for example, allows you to create budgets that make sense for you. You Need a Budget breaks down your spending as well.

3. Take action to boost your credit score

Here are three ways to do just that:

  1. Set up autopay: Whether or not you make payments on time is the most important element in the calculation of your credit score. As long as you pay your bills on or before the deadline, your score will be in good standing. Turbo is a great, free resource to monitor how your credit score is affected by your bill payments.
  2. Know your credit utilization: Something that we don't always take into consideration is our credit utilization. Your credit utilization is the ratio of your credit card balances to credit limits. If you're using your credit cards responsibly and paying bills on time, you will lower your credit utilization percentage, thus increasing your credit score.
  3. Keep old accounts open: Your credit age makes up 15% of your credit score, and the only way to increase the age is to keep old accounts open and avoid opening new ones.

4. Set clear goals and hold yourself accountable

Does your family have big vacation plans, or maybe a new house is on the horizon? Make sure that you're considering both short and long-term goals early on, so they don't creep up on you. Be honest with yourself from the get-go so you can plan and prepare for your upcoming expenses. Once you've set your goals and your focus is on getting back on track, hold yourself accountable by setting regular check-ins to track your progress.

5. Be easy on yourself

Events, like the holidays, birthdays or vacation are meant to be celebrated, and that means festivities, fun and (maybe) some frivolousness. Don't beat yourself up if your bank account looks different than you expected after they're over. As long as you're actively working toward your financial goals, being consistent and being patient with yourself, your bank statements (and financial fatigue) will even out.

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Baby clothes are SO cute.

Maybe it's because they are typically either designed to make children look like little bears or mini-adults. Or maybe it's because they're just so tiny? 🤷 Any which way you look at it, they're beyond adorable. I mean—what human can resist an infant who looks like a tiny, soft bunny?

Cute as they are, they're also kind of pricey. And babies grow quickly, which means they need new sizes quickly. Oh, and also they get poop and spit-up on a lot of stuff, and then they eventually graduate to stains that are of the paint and peanut butter variety.

The lesson? The cost of baby clothes (and don't get me started on shoes that fit them for two seconds) adds up, but on the other hand—with the amount they grow and stain things—you sort of feel like you need a lot and that you're always looking for the next size stuff.

I swear, I just brought up the 18-month clothes, but now I need to get the 24-month size clothes out. (How is such a large part of motherhood constantly cycling through clothing that fits/doesn't fit your baby anymore?)

Cue: Hand-me-downs.

I found out the sex of my babies each of the three times I was pregnant: girl, girl, and then girl again. So, let's just say, we have gotten our money's worth with children's clothes over the years. Plus, my kids have cousins around the same ages so we've gotten a fair share of hand-me-downs from them, along with random pieces like snowsuits or extra swaddle blankets from friends. They've all been a godsend.

I've always been kind of sentimental about clothes—I can often tie memories to what I was wearing. My 21st birthday party? That very short blue and green floral number. The night my husband proposed to me? An ugly work outfit that I changed out of before we went out to dinner to celebrate (😂). My hospital stay for my youngest daughter? New black pajamas I treated myself to.

But somehow—likely the extreme cuteness levels—baby clothes kick the sentimental levels up about a hundred notches.

I remember the first piece of baby clothing I got as a gift when I was pregnant with my oldest daughter. It was a sweet pink one piece with a little teddy bear in the center. It had an eyelet detail to it and the feet looked like little bear paws. My mom gave it to me the night we told our families that we were having a little girl.

I remember imagining how the tiny little human inside me would be able to fit into this tiny little outfit.

I remember imagining what it would be like to button her into it and hold her while wearing it.

I remember finally dressing her in it and marveling at how amazing all of this was. I was a mother, and this was my baby.

I remember buying each of my children's coming home outfits and what they wore for their first Christmas. I remember seeing each of them in specific outfits that the other one wore, truly in awe that this was a new human we created, in the same outfit the other human we created wore.

I remember putting a hand-me-down sweater on my daughter that was once her father's sweater. I never knew clothes could melt my heart until that day. Seeing some of the one piece pajamas my girls wore all the time—like those monkey jams and the multicolored striped Zutano onesie—bring me back to the time of my life when I was a "new mom" again.

But then I remember thinking, okay, we have a LOT of clothes, and we can't keep them all. Even if we have another baby at some point down the road, we need to get rid of a lot of stuff now. It's overwhelming.

So, as Marie Kondo might advise, I've sorted through the clothes that no longer fit my kids and I've kept the pieces that still spark joy. Those pieces are now used as doll clothes or are safely tucked away in my children's memory boxes in the basement so that they can have them when they're older.

The rest? We have either passed them on as hand-me-downs to other families or we've donated them. And honestly, giving another family who could use our hand-me-downs (we've spared them the ones with poop and spit-up stains!) feels just as great, if not greater, than scoring helpful hand-me-downs for your own kiddos.

It's one way the village is there for you in motherhood. I can't, unfortunately, get to my sister and my niece five hours away from me to drop off a container of soup for dinner or to take her to the park to give my sister a break for an hour—but I can pack up my daughter's clothes and bring them down the next time we visit.

In the busyness of our day-to-day, my friend and I can't nail down a time to get the kids together—but she can lend me a snowsuit for my youngest to use—coming in the clutch and saving me about $50.

Getting a bag of hand-me-downs from another mom is equivalent to getting a big, genuine hug from a mama who knows how hard this all can be. She is thinking of you, reaching out to you and extending a helping hand. And the best part is that this helping-hand-me-down chain can continue because the clothes she gives you can then be passed along to another mama and so on and so on.

Who knew that these little cute pieces of clothing could connect us all in such a gushy, beautiful way?

To all the mothers who have passed their hand-me-downs on to another mama in need—thank you. Keep on thinking of ways to help your fellow moms when you can, because we really are all on this wild ride together.

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Christmas Eve is a rare birthday, and it's a fitting birthday for a baby girl who was a gift to her own family, and those of other sick babies.

When Krysta Davis was four months pregnant with her daughter, Rylei Arcadia Lovett, Krysta and her husband Dereck got some heartbreaking news. Baby Rylei had Anencephaly. Her brain was underdeveloped to a fatal degree. Doctors gave Krysta the option of having Rylei then, in her second trimester, or carrying her to term so that her tiny organs could be donated to babies who needed them.

"If I wasn't able to bring my baby home, at least others could bring theirs home," Davis told ABC affiliate News Channel 9.

As heartbroken as she was, Krysta carried her baby girl for five more months, giving her body time to grow the organs that would be such an amazing gift to families who were in a kind of pain the Lovetts know all too well.

Doctors told the couple that Rylei would probably live for about 30 minutes after birth, but Rylei held on for an entire week. "There's no way to describe how amazing it felt. When you go to thinking you'll only have 30 minutes with your child and you get an entire week," Davis told News Channel 9.

For that week, Rylei got all the cuddles and skin-to-skin contact a baby could ask for. "I wouldn't trade this week for anything in the whole wide world," she wrote on a Facebook page dedicated to Rylei's memory, adding that she was so proud of her daughter and the fight she put up.



Rylei was then taken for surgery, and although some of her organs were no longer viable due to oxygen loss, some very important ones were.

"They said her heart valves will go toward saving two other babies and the lungs will be sent off for research to see what else can be learned about Anencephaly from them," Krysta wrote.

Krysta and Dereck only got to hold onto their baby for a week. It's not fair and that pain is unimaginable. But now, two other families will get to hold their babies for a lot longer. It can't take away Krysta's pain, but it does make her happy to know that somewhere, another mama is holding a little piece of Rylei.

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One morning, after a rousing rendition of up-every-two-hours-with-a-teething-baby, bleary-eyed and fully-caffeinated, I texted my best friend:

I am 100% done having children. I can't do this again.

She came through with some sympathetic words, mood-lightening emojis and a gentle reminder that this is temporary. "It's the fatigue talking," she suggested.

But no, it wasn't just the fatigue talking. That morning, sitting like a zombie in my office cube, I meant it. The night before, as I rocked my youngest and stroked her wispy baby curls, I knew I was done.

She chewed on her fingers and looked up at me with wide eyes and a tear-stained face. We locked eyes, and while I didn't resent her at that moment (how could I?), I did feel a sense of finality with this stage of motherhood.

I realized that I'm ready to move on. I'm ready to watch her grow into a person and move beyond the baby years.

Eventually, life moved beyond that evil emerging molar, and we settled back into our routine. I returned to being a functioning member of my team at work. And at home, I'd catch myself smiling, looking at my two girls as they played together with my husband. This is what our family is meant to look like, I thought. Life is loud and full and happy. I don't need anything else.

Then, one night as we were getting ready for bed, after a visit with some friends who are expecting their first baby, my husband said it: "I miss when you were pregnant."

My heart raced a little—surely he didn't mean it. He must just be having a weak moment after seeing our friends with their baby. HE had been the one who was adamant that two children was enough for us. HE had been the one to quickly shut down any "what ifs" that I'd raised. How could he be saying this right after I told myself we were done?

So, I reminded him. "No, you don't. You don't miss my cankles or carpal tunnel syndrome or my high blood pressure. Or my complaining and flopping around trying to get comfortable in bed with no less than six pillows. Really, you don't."

But he missed the other stuff, he said. The magic of it all—feeling the baby move, wondering if it was a boy or a girl and what our family dynamic would be like when the baby arrived. "Relax," he'd said. He was just being wistful. He assured me that there were no more babies are in our future.

As he rolled over that night and went to sleep (easily, might I add), I lay awake reliving his words. I knew what he meant. Growing a family together is a special time, one filled with awe. After this particular conversation, I was 75% sure we were done having kids.

Life settled back in again, but this time my 4-year-old threw me. She climbed up on the couch, into my lap, and put her arms around my neck.

"Mommy," she sighed and paused dramatically as though a big proclamation was looming. She pulled back and looked me in the eyes, "I'd like a brother."

I laughed it off and explained that she had a sister, which was so great. I only had a sister, Daddy only had a sister and we are all very happy people. She brushed me off after a couple of minutes and ran off to play.

But then I found myself thinking. What's one more kid, really? We know what we're doing. We'd be so much more relaxed. We already have a minivan for cryin' out loud!

In my heart of hearts, I believe we are done. I'm grateful for what I have and I love our family, but there are small moments where I catch myself wondering if a little boy would round us out. If we just waited until our youngest was a little older…

It's these moments of second guessing myself—the wondering, the daydreaming—that get me. But it's also the big moments of practicality and reason (hello, day care costs) that then reel me back in. We're doing fine just the way we are.

So, like I said…

That's how I know I'm 50% sure we're done having children. 😜

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