A modern lifestyle brand redefining motherhood

Let’s face it, the “bad boys,” like bad news, get all the press. The media thrives on tragedy. Stories of goodness tend to get buried. Hollywood tells us that the bad boys get the girls. The classic movie plot has the good guy on the sidelines, being “friend zoned.”


Dating today may be more challenging than ever before. There are no clear rules. Many celebrities and politicians seem devoid of what, in prior generations, was known as basic moral character.

Despite the headlines, there are a lot of good men out there. Unfortunately, these role models are not often front and center. This illuminates the difficult yet important task facing all parents: to talk to their children about relationships. Today, the word “consent” needs to be part of the sex talk, which means we have to also talk about how society looks at sexual acts and what is acceptable behavior.

The depiction of sex in the media has changed since I was in my 20s, as it had from the time my parents were that age. Today, sex seems to be everywhere, yet there is just as much confusion about the topic as ever. The perception is that everyone does it, that it has no meaning and is just an act. There is much more to sex than that, of course, and our kids need to hear the truth from us.

Though my kids weren’t exactly happy about it, before they left for college, I talked to them about sex. Even though sex had been discussed as they were growing up, we had more conversations in the days leading up to their departure.

I have three girls and a boy. The conversations with my son were similar to those I had with my daughters, but also very different. There were, of course, different gender realities as well as differences in societal expectations.

The conversations with my son were sometimes more awkward, but he needed to hear my thoughts and concerns, as a woman, as his mom. I know I didn’t say everything I wanted to and may have missed some points, but think I covered what was most important….

Sex is not something that “just happens.” Whether we want to admit it or not, it is something we make a conscious decision about. I explained to my kids that if you can’t talk about it, you shouldn’t do it. If talking about it feels wrong, if it embarrasses you, then that should tell you something.

In many cases, sex comes with expectations. When these expectations are not met or when they conflict, problems ensue. The only way to ensure both partners have the same expectations is to talk about expectations first. When they don’t match, someone gets hurt.

I told each of my children that I want them to wait – if not for marriage, at least until they are in a committed relationship based on love, respect, and trust. I know this is not my choice to make. They are adults, and adults need to make their own adult decisions. That being said, the decision to have or not to have sex cannot be made alone. It requires a partner, one with equal say.

I told them sex should be something positive. It can be special, it can be fun, but it must be consensual, and consent is a two-way street. You never, under any circumstances, force attention on someone who does not want it. You also need to respect your own body and emotions. If uncomfortable in a situation, it is your responsibility to say so.

Sometimes the moment is not right, if one or both of you have been drinking too much, for example, or are otherwise in a vulnerable place. Even if you very much want to have sex, if it is not right for both of you, at that time, it is wrong.

Have sex for the right reasons. Sadness, anger, loneliness, and revenge are not good reasons. If you say no (to an appropriately-toned request), say it kindly. And if you hear no, accept it without argument.

I have talked to my daughters many times about how they can keep themselves safe. Although I acknowledge the unfairness of it, I have warned them about drinking too much alcohol, about being aware of their surroundings, about having their words and actions misconstrued, about staying in a group. I would never imply that a woman could encourage or deserve a violation of her body, but there are steps one can take to try to minimize the risk. I wish this wasn’t part of the conversation, but in today’s world, it is the reality.

I have told my son that I expect him to behave in a respectful manner toward everyone, that some will apply pressure and encourage him to act and speak disparagingly toward women. But that is not who he is. Some will talk about “getting some action” and talk about women as if they are objects. He knows better. He knows how men should behave. He has excellent role models, who show him how “real men” treat others. He knows to help someone if it is within his power and has demonstrated his willingness to do so, even when it is inconvenient.

I think we all need to watch out for each other more. Pay attention to what is going on around you. If you notice someone has made poor choices and is at risk either of endangering him or herself or another person, step in. Speak up when you see someone behaving badly. If someone has had too much to drink, suggest they go home and help them get there. Don’t wait until an issue has escalated to the point where things get out of control – where intervening could put you in danger as well.

I wish this conversation didn’t have to happen. I wish that all people would show respect, that everyone would consider others’ rights while asserting their own. But if we do this hard work now, maybe one day, our kids and grandkids won’t need to worry so much.

Until then, we need to have the talk.

Who said motherhood doesn't come with a manual?

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When you become a mama, your definition of a smooth morning undergoes a complete evolution. Now, you consider it a win if your real alarm wakes you up and you get to drink coffee while it's still warm. The not-so-smooth mornings? Well, let's face it, that's a rough way to start the day.

When the wake-up call comes early and the coffee has been forgotten in the microwave, it may seem absolutely impossible to carve out any time for yourself. But a centered, confident mama is a happier mama, and there are some simple ways to sneak self-care into your morning to ensure you're putting your best face forward.

Specializing in quick, easy and (we must say) beautiful morning makeup routines, Woosh Beauty understands busy mornings, and has created an 'everything-in-one' makeup palette that is our new secret weapon for feeling like we made the effort to center ourselves, too.

Inspired by Woosh Beauty, here are five ways we've given our morning beauty routines a self-care makeover.

1. Make time (and space) for calm

As moms, time is priceless and that's especially true in the morning. Even if you're racing against the clock, it's worth it (trust us) to hit the pause button for just five minutes before tackling all the to-dos on your list.

With The Fold Out Face from Woosh Beauty, you have all the makeup you need (coverage and color) in one compact, portable palette. That means no scrambling to find your concealer. No opening, closing, then reopening and closing eyeshadows and powders.

Most importantly, no need to set up shop in front of your vanity/bathroom mirror/designated makeup space while keeping one eye on a constantly moving child. The Fold Out Face goes wherever you go and gives you everything you need in the flip of one flap—so you really can focus on yourself.

2. Create rituals that boost confidence

Even if you're going on your third day with the same yoga pants (they're so comfy!), it's important to make time in the morning to do something that will put a confident pep in your step.

While makeup has likely been part of your routine for years, motherhood can take a toll on your skin in new ways—which is why having 13 full-sized cosmetics, made from luxurious high-performing mineral-based formulas, allows you to erase the appearance of under-eye circles, perfect any imperfections and give yourself an effortless glow—all in less than five minutes.

So even if you don't have time to meticulously apply makeup, you can look and feel like you did. 😉

3. Allow our minds to drift 

For most of us, mornings mean going from zero to 60 in about five seconds flat. Before fully immersing yourself in the obligations of the day, it's nice to have just a few minutes to allow your mind to drift away from the to-do list. Woosh Beauty makes having mindspace while checking off "put on makeup" possible by numbering the order in which the cosmetics in The Fold Out Face should be applied.

4. Savor little luxuries

Before you go spend the morning driving kids around to the tune of nursery rhymes and eat a lunch of PB&J crusts, it can make a world of difference to your outlook to lavish in something that is all yours.

We love that Woosh Beauty makes that simple with The Essential Brush Set, a luxe collection of double-ended brushes that are numbered to correspond with the steps in the Fold Out Face, and come in a soft storage bag to keep them away from kids who may mistake them as paint brushes.

5. Be kinder to ourselves

Sometimes, a healthy self-voice for the rest of the day starts with rituals that remind us we're doing good for our bodies, too. By using Woosh Beauty products in your morning beauty routine, which are free of parabens, sulfates, gluten and fragrance—not to mention they are animal cruelty-free—you aren't just applying makeup, you're applying products and using tools that you can feel good about.

In the morning, a seemingly little thing like taking a few minutes for self-care is really a big thing that will continue to pay off with a beautiful outlook throughout the day—and with The Fold-Out Face from Woosh Beauty, it pays off with a beautiful look throughout the day, too.

Motherly readers can receive a 20% discount site wide using the code MOTHERLY at checkout.


This article was sponsored by Woosh Beauty. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

I was at my midwife appointment two weeks before my due date. After hearing my daughter's heartbeat and answering some questions, the midwife asked if I was planning to breastfeed.

Mentally scanning my perfectly outlined first-time-mom birth plan—complete with bullet points and bolded phrases which I had carefully picked—I realized that I hadn't even considered this notion until half a second ago. I was so preoccupied with the details surrounding how I was going to get this baby out of me that I hadn't contemplated how I would actually keep her alive once she was disconnected from my placenta.

I shrugged and replied, "Sure, I guess I will if I can." So I added my breastfeeding bullet point to my birth plan.

I woke up to my buzzing phone on the morning of March 29th. "Due Date" popped up as a notification on my calendar, as if the birth of my child could be scheduled in the same way you would an oil change.

I had everything planned. I would first labor quietly, un-medicated, wearing makeup and using my hypnobirthing techniques I been studying. Then, when I was ready to push, my baby would be delivered in a very reasonable amount of time with minimal tearing.

She would be placed on my chest where together we would soak in the hormonal love cocktail that I had read so much about. Afterward, I would unpack my laptop to check work emails during the downtime that I had assured myself would be bountiful during our hospital stay.

Growing more impatient as the time lingered since my due date notification, the hours turned to days. My water finally broke three long days later. My actual labor started quickly after I began bragging to my visitors about how manageable the contractions were.

I sweated my makeup off soon after. The calm and meditative laboring state I had prepared myself for was more akin to the calmness one would have upon placing the palms of their hands onto the burners of a searing hot stove.

The intervals between my contractions vanished as I eventually ripped my clothes off, hoping I could somehow crawl out of my skin. I gasped for breath between sobs when my midwife assured me that I was two whole centimeters dilated.

As fate would have it, 48 hours later, I would deliver my bruised and exhausted baby laying on my back, crying and shaking on an ice cold operating table.

As it turns out, enjoying approximately 35 seconds of sleep in a span of days doesn't do much for one's patience levels. Sore and freshly bound around the abdomen, I couldn't possibly be expected to employ my motherly duties yet, could I?

Whoever was supposed to serve me the hormonal love cocktail I was promised, apparently skipped my hospital room. My emails went unanswered as I ineptly tended to my shrieking newborn.

"The Universe laughs when you have a plan," I once read. The Universe must have taken one look at me and rejoiced: Boy was I in for a lesson.

Once settled in at home, I realized that breastfeeding wasn't going to work for us after all. Then I experienced a heavy period of postpartum depression.

Just weeks prior, I had everything planned so precisely. Things that pertained not just to the infancy stage I was so freshly experiencing now, but things that I had no right to plan, as I wouldn't truly understand them for months and some even years.

I had sworn to myself that I would always treat my child with kindness and patience...and look good while doing so. I told myself that I would reserve time for me to enjoy my hobbies and never "lose sight of myself." But suddenly, intellectually stimulating toys, perfectly situated hair bows, and frankly, brushed teeth meant much less to me.

Through the birth of my second daughter, I learned that a healthy baby is enough, no matter how they get here. This time, using medication, I graciously welcomed her into the world. Promptly after enjoying the love cocktail I had waited so patiently for, I let the nurses whisk her off to care for her in the nursery as I took a well-deserved nap.

Life with two small children required adjustments and another shift in expectations, but this time around I laughed my way through it. (And I learned to appreciate the texture of my unwashed hair, too.)

It wasn't until I finally let go of who I thought I should be that I finally felt satisfied by who I am. I am often frazzled, over-stressed and disheveled. I don't always feel very interesting and I am no longer the perfectly curated woman I once was.

I'm chronically late and not unlike my oldest daughter, I often burst in exhausted, bruised and five days late. Deadlines and appointments sometimes slip by and surprisingly, my heart continues to beat.

But most importantly, I'm an extremely good mother. Pay no attention to the non-organic popsicle stains running down my children's mismatched clothing or the bird nests of hair sitting atop their heads: because we are happy. And that is what is important.

Despite my earlier expectations that I have fallen quite short of, my children are well. They are not perfect, nor am I. Neither were any of the women who have come before or will come after me. I only make plans now with the caveat that they must be subject to change. The Universe can now laugh with me, not at me.

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You might be feeling duped at this point. The doctors, blogs and baby books were all very clear—this pregnancy business lasts 40 weeks.

And yet, here you are, a week (or more) over this hard and fast deadline, with no end in sight, your belly still painfully swollen as your baby continues to stretch and arch without any seeming interest in ever moving out.

You are most likely very, very over it.

If you're like me, you fluctuate (sometimes by the hour) between tears and laughter. Your Google search history alternates exclusively between "natural ways to induce labor" and "earliest signs of labor," the latter tapped out on your keyboard with the hesitant hope that maybe that extra heartburn you had this afternoon is a good sign? Maybe those weird (and extremely uncomfortable) pushes on your cervix are actually early labor? (Spoiler alert: Probably not.)

Because you're still pregnant.

I see you, desperately ticking off every suggestion in that "natural ways to induce labor" list, living off a diet of spicy food and pineapple washed down with raspberry leaf tea. You walk and walk and walk despite sciatica or run-of-the-mill nerve twinges every time your baby bears down.

You have sex (whether or not you're feeling particularly sexy) and break out your breast pump because your sister's co-worker's wife swears that's what sent her into labor in the end. You listen to (and attempt) every off-hand suggestion friends, relatives, and perfect strangers offer.

And you're still pregnant.

In short, you try everything. And nothing works. You wonder if, in fact, you are a medical marvel and pause on googling the risks of castor oil to look up the longest pregnancy on record. (375 days—a whopping three months longer than normal—but the details are a little fishy.)

Sometimes you're able to laugh at yourself, quoting the gestation of an elephant (a year and a half, but you already knew that re: the aforementioned Googling) and answering every inquiry into your well-being with, "Well, I'm still pregnant! So…!"

Other times, you're borderline inconsolable. Late night doubts keep you up despite your doctor or midwife's recommendations to take advantage of the opportunity for more sleep. You worry you're doing something wrong, as the "what is going on in there" questions continue to build in your mind. You worry something is wrong with your baby, the "what-ifs" and "what will be's" rolling through your brain like the world's worst broken record. You worry that you're broken.

And you're still pregnant.

Every contraction becomes a taunt, a tease of something as you start to tentatively track or lie down at night certain that tonight will be the real thing...only to wake the next morning, all signs of labor having dissipated in the night. Leaving you still uncertain. Still anxious. Still pregnant.

Maybe you feel yourself start to stop trusting your body, or at least question whether it really knows what to do or when things are ready. Even if this isn't your first baby rodeo, you wonder, "Do I even know what labor feels like?"

You begin to forget the time before you were pregnant.

Maybe you start to lose sense of the space-time continuum as everyone and their dog seems to be bringing home their babies around you. Even friends with later due dates than you. Even celebrities that you swore announced their pregnancies months after you did. Like when the YouTube star whose prenatal workouts you follow announces that she only has 30 days left to go, you find yourself shouting, "IN THEORY, KATRINA!" at your tiny phone screen.

You may have gone a little pregnancy stir-crazy.

I see you, mama, because I've felt those overdue pains, those overdue stretches, and that overdue stress. I've read and reread the same articles and sent my midwife panicked texts and stared at my belly, tears in my eyes, and wondered what am I doing wrong.

And while I waited, I tried to remember:

Odds are, everything is totally and completely fine. Most of the time babies are born when they are ready to be born—even if it's way past when we're ready. Due dates are necessary, but they're also estimations. Setting our hearts on them is a quick way to set ourselves up for disappointment.

This is actually way more common than you think. Only about 5% of babies are born on their actual due dates. The more people you tell you are overdue, the more the stories of overdue babies start to pour out. So many of my friends were overdue babies, and even more have had overdue newborns of their own. As isolating as it feels, you're actually joining a very big club of very strong women.

There's still so much to appreciate about this time. When it feels like you're rivaling that elephant in gestation time, it can be hard to remember what a fleeting time this is. But please remember how short pregnancy really is in the grand scheme of things. And if this is your last pregnancy, do your best to still feel a bit of wonder at the magic of your baby moving in your belly. Marvel in the miracle happening in your body right now. And, at the very least, do your best to take advantage of these last few days when you can sleep through the night and don't always have your hands full.

There's not a wrong way to bring a healthy baby into the world. You are not broken, mama. You are not failing because your body isn't cooperating with your self-inflicted expectations. Every day of your overdue pregnancy will one day be part of your baby's story—and yours. Let go of your expectations or the idea of a "perfect" pregnancy. Because, trust me, your baby will be perfect either way.

One day (so soon!), this will all just be part of your baby's story.

Think of it as the perfect fodder to guilt your kid when he's a teenager! (Kidding!) (Kind of!) When you're waiting for an overdue baby, it feels like your whole life is on hold until you can break through into the next phase. But once it happens, every extra day of pregnancy suddenly fades away. All you remember is how much you wanted this tiny baby who is now in your arms, and everything you had to do to get there was just part of the journey—and feels so, SO worth it.

And they will come out—promise.

[Editor's note: Justine works here at Motherly, and we are very pleased to say that she did, in fact, welcome a beautiful, healthy baby into the world. (Congrats, Justine!) So hold on, mama! You've got this.]

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The American Academy of Pediatrics says that newborns, especially, do not need a bath every day. While parents should make sure the diaper region of a baby is clean, until a baby learns how to crawl around and truly get messy, a daily bath is unnecessary.

So, why do we feel like kids should bathe every day?

Bathing frequency

There is no scientific or biological answer to how often you should bathe your child. During pre-modern times, parents hardly ever bathed their children. The modern era made it a societal norm to bathe your child daily.

Many babies and toddlers, especially those who aren't walking yet, don't need to be washed with soap every day. If a child has dry, sensitive skin, parents should wash their child with a mild soap once a week.

On other nights, the child may simply soak or rinse off in a lukewarm, plain water bath if they are staying fairly clean. Additionally, parents can soak their children in a water bath without soap most nights or as needed as part of a routine.

Cause of skin sensitivity

Many problems with sensitive, irritated skin are made worse by bathing habits that unintentionally dry out the skin too much. Soaking in a hot bath for long periods of time and scrubbing will lead to dry skin. Additionally, many existing skin conditions will worsen if you over-scrub your child or use drying, perfumed soaps.

Some skin conditions, like childhood eczema (atopic dermatitis), are not caused by dirt or lack of hygiene. Therefore, parents do not need to scrub the inflamed areas. Scrubbing will cause dry, sensitive skin to become even more dry.

Tips for bath time

Some best practices for bath time for kids who have dry, itchy, sensitive skin or eczema include.

  • The proper temperature for a bath is lukewarm
  • Baths should be brief (5-10 minutes long)
  • To avoid drying out your child's skin, use mild, fragrance-free soaps (or non-soap cleansers)
  • Use small amounts of soap and wash the child with your hands, rather than scrubbing with a soapy washcloth.
  • Do not let your child sit and play in the tub or basin if the water is all soapy.
  • Use the soap at the end of the bath, not the beginning.
  • When finishing the bath, rinse your child with warm fresh water to remove the soap from their body. Let the child "dance" or "wiggle" for a few seconds to shake off some of the water, and then apply moisturizing ointments, creams, or lotions while their skin is still wet.
  • Simple store-brand petroleum jelly is a wonderful moisturizer, especially if applied right when the child leaves the tub while the skin is still wet.
  • Avoid creams with fragrances, coloring agents, preservatives, and other chemicals. Simple, white, or colorless products are often better for children's skin.
  • Do not use alcohol-based products.

Originally posted on Children's National Health System's Rise and Shine.

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Instead of spending hours searching for the perfect gift, trust the experts—mamas and kids! We sifted through Target's toy section to find the highest rated products.

Here are some of our favorites:

Cookie Play Food Set

Colorful wooden play food is a foundation for independent play. Featuring 12 sliceable cookies, various toppings and a knife, spatula, kitchen mitt and cookie sheet, you child will have everything they need to bake.

Melissa & Doug Slice and Bake Wooden Cookie Play Food Set, Target, $16.99

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WubbaNub

With nearly 200 reviews and a 4.5 star rating, this pacifier is a favorite. It's made to position easily for baby and with medical grade materials—it's even distributed to hospitals across the nation. Plus, it's machine-washable. 🙌

WubbaNub Giraffe Pacifier, Target, $13.99

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SkeeBall

Old school gifts are back this year and we're obsessed with this miniature skee-ball game. It's foldable so you can transport it with ease and includes five balls and four scoring hoops. Ideal for your little to play on their own or with the entire family.

SkeeBall The Classic Arcade Game, Target, $29.99

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Car Seat Activity Toy

This attaches to the car seat or stroller handle, providing endless entertainment for baby. With a variety of colors, textures, shapes and a teether, rattle and mirror, it'll be the only item you need on the go.

Infantino GaGa Spiral Car Seat Activity Toy, Target, $14.99

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Baby Alive

For the little who wants to play mama too, this baby doll teaches kids how to make food, change diapers and give them a bottle. Perfect for your sidekick!

Baby Alive Sweet Spoonfuls Baby Doll, Target, $19.89

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Teepee

Instead of making a fort out of pillows and blankets, set up this teepee for your child's adventures. The flap rolls back so they can climb in and out and there's a circle cut out that makes a secret entrance. 🤫

Kids Teepee—Pillowfort, Target, $34.99

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Squirrel Game

The entire family will enjoy playing this game. Spin the spinner and use the squeezer to pick up matching acorns. It's perfect for teaching your littles matching and sorting skills. Note: It does have small parts so it's recommended for kids 3+.

The Sneaky, Snacky Squirrel Game! Target, $10.55

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Cleaning Set

Teach your child chores in a fun way with this beautiful set. They'll help you around the house and play on their own with the cleaning items.

Melissa & Doug Let's Play House! Dust, Sweep and Mop Set, Target, $24.99

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Ice Cream Cart

Create your own ice cream shop, complete with a magic (hint: magnetic) scooper. We love the music it plays, helping kids develop sensory skills, and the push capabilities.

LeapFrog Scoop and Learn Ice Cream Cart, Target, $34.99

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Fire Truck

Children who love imaginative play will adore this fire truck. It assembles easily, has its own steering wheel, plus cutouts that allow littles to pop in and out of. What more could we want?

Antsy Pants Vehicle Kit, Fire Truck, Target $49.99

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Alarm Clock + Nightlight

If you're ready to help teach your child a positive nighttime and morning routine, this clock features everything you need. A screen shows animations and the time, a nap timer can be set separately from the regular alarm, and the glow of the screen will let you little know when it's okay to wake up. Pro tip: Teach them that if the light isn't glowing green, they can't jump out of bed just yet.

OK to Wake! Alarm Clock and Night-Light, Target, $29.99

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Magna-Tiles

The 3D magnetic building set teaches kids STEM skills as they work to build their own creation. They'll stay busy for hours imagining endless possibilities.

MAGNA-TILES House 28pc, Target, $49.99

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STEM Robot Mouse

For the coder, we love this activity set. Kids get to create their own maze grid by using the coding cards and then let Colby (the mouse) race to find the cheese. 🧀

Learning Resources STEM Robot Mouse Coding Activity Set, Target, $34.49

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HatchiBabies

Kids will need to 'love' their HatchiBaby with rubs and hugs until it's ready to hatch, then wait to see if you have a boy or girl! Once they've hatched, children can feed, burp and snuggle the HatchiBaby, getting life-like responses back.

Hatchimals HatchiBabies CheeTree, Target, $48.99

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Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy.You've got this.

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