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As a stay-at-home mom,

sometimes it really helps to hear another adult's voice during the day. And


while we typically prefer real life friends, the virtual kind are pretty good,

too. Check out our list of podcasts we love and stay current on the latest

news, discoveries in science, and human interest stories.

Exclusively for mom.

1. Slate's

Mom and Dad Are Fighting

The hosts of this podcast have several kids between

1-year-old and pre-teen, so topics range from choosing baby names to spending

quality time with your teen and everything in between (free range parenting,

vaccinations, etc.). Hosts Allison Benedikt and

Dan Kois offer their recent triumphs

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and fails in every ep, as well as recommendations on books, movies, TV,

articles, parenting tips, etc.

Where to start:

“Disdaingate Edition" (November 20, 2014) –

after making an off-hand remark in a previous episode regarding his disdain for

stay-at-home parents, Dan and Allison dive deeper into the many feelings

associated with the decision to stay home with the kids vs. remaining in the

workforce, and speak to a SAHM listener who offers her own insight. This is an

awesome conversation-starter!

For daytime listening only…

2. Limetown

Producers of Limetown are skilled in the gifted art of the

cliffhanger and use it at the close of nearly every episode, much to listeners'

delight and frustration. This seven-part series recaps the mystery of the

(fictional) Tennessee community

of Limetown and the sudden disappearance of its 300 inhabitants. Supernatural

science experiments, mind control, assassinations of those willing to speak –

this podcast has it all! The creepy factor is at a 10 with this one, so listen

during the day. You'll thank us later.

Where to start:

The first episode – absolutely no skipping

around or you'll be completely lost.

3. Lore

Author Aaron Mahnke dives into fascinating, macabre, and

often shocking true-life horror stories in this bi-weekly production. While

most of these tales took place in the distant past, the human elements of

superstition, fear, and aggression form a strong and disturbing connection to

the long-dead featured characters.

Where to start:

Episode 15 – “Unboxed." Call your mom and

have her throw out all of your childhood dolls. Don't ask questions. Just do

it.

Love Storytelling?

4. Strangers

It's a bit difficult to sum up this podcast. Host Lea Thau explores

the personal stories of real-life people, exposing their pain, joys, and

complicated emotions, but bares her own raw life experiences, as well. Strangers

is a beautiful reminder that there are stories happening all around us –

complicated, fascinating stories – even when we don't realize it.

Where to start:

“Two Men and a Baby" (June 15, 2014), and

then “Like a Pizza: Two Men and a Baby – the Follow-Up" (June 12, 2015) – The

story of a gay couple in NYC, who, just six hours after being approved as a

potential foster home, is handed an infant to care for. How could they not fall

in love, even though there was no permanence guaranteed? A sweet story of the

power of parental love.

Learn something new every day.

5. Radiolab

Radiolab is a giant in the podcast world, not only available

on virtually every podcast outlet, but also aired on over 500 radio stations

across the country, for good reason; Radiolab's story's are detailed

without being confusing, thorough without being excessively long-winded, funny,

and touching all at once. This is one of the few podcasts that really makes you

feel smarter after listening.

Where to start:

Any episode with the late, great Dr. Oliver

Sacks is a fascinating exploration into science and life itself.

Tell us: What are you listening to?

When I was expecting my first child, I wanted to know everything that could possibly be in store for his first year.

I quizzed my own mom and the friends who ventured into motherhood before I did. I absorbed parenting books and articles like a sponge. I signed up for classes on childbirth, breastfeeding and even baby-led weaning. My philosophy? The more I knew, the better.

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