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9 TED Talks to inspire working mamas

“Working motherhood is here to stay.”

9 TED Talks to inspire working mamas

You're killing it at work. You're a supermama. You're an amazing partner. (Okay, sometimes you eat leftover cake for breakfast. No judgment here.) We all need some motivation to get us through the hard days, and encouragement on the good ones.

Here are TED Talks that will inspire + energize you in your career.

1. Amy Cuddy: Your body language may shape who you are  

Need another reason to stand tall, shake hands firmly and speak with confidence?Social psychologist Amy Cuddy explains how walking with confidence doesn't just make you look confident—it actually transforms how confident you feel:

"Our bodies change our minds and our minds can change our behavior, and our behavior can change our outcomes."

💪

2. Shonda Rhimes: My year of saying yes to everything

Shonda Rhimes, the powerhouse behind 70 hours of television per season discusses the power of saying yes—specifically when she says 'yes' to playing with her kids, even when she's working so hard at a career she loves:

"I understood that saying 'yes' to playing with my children likely saved my career."

🙌

3. Tiffany N. Stallings: Unleash the mom guilt

When Tiffany Stallings gets an email from her daughter asking her when she's coming home, she feels the burden of mom guilt. She uncovers three truths that help guide her on the journey of letting go of the fears in motherhood:

"I felt guilty because I didn't breastfeed long enough. I felt guilty because on the weekends I simply wanted to rest instead of shuttling my children to get to another playdate. I felt guilty because I couldn't afford to stay at home with them and I had to put them in daycare."

​💜

4. Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

The Facebook COO and Lean In founder's TEDx Talk is a classic in the genre. Outlining the forces that keep women out of top leadership positions in the business world, Sandberg makes the case:

"I think a world where half of our countries and our companies were run by women would be a better world."

👏

5. Nila Kaushik: Mompreneurs-mothers as entrepreneurs

After realizing how her career changed after becoming a mom, Neela Kaushik realized that she wanted to encourage other moms to do things for themselves and embrace their influence in and out of the workplace.

6. Anne-Marie Slaughter: Can we all 'have it all'?

The work-life thought leader makes the case that not only do women need to be more valued at work, but that family life needs to be valued more in society in general:

"I was raised to believe that championing women's rights meant doing everything we could to get women to the top. And I still hope that I live long enough to see men and women equally represented at all levels of the workforce. But I've come to believe that we have to value family every bit as much as we value work, and that we should entertain the idea that doing right by those we love will make all of us better at everything we do."

YES. All the 👪...

7. Hanna Rosin: New data on the rise of women

Why are women so awesome?It's a question we ask ourselves all the time 👯 . Reporter Hanna Rosin dug into the data and found some fascinating nuggets:

"[Women] are starting to dominate lots of professions—doctors, lawyers, bankers, accountants. Over 50% of managers are women these days, and in the 15 professions projected to grow the most in the next decade, all but two of them are dominated by women... We're now going through an amazing and unprecedented moment where the power dynamics between men and women are shifting very rapidly, and in many of the places where it counts the most, women are, in fact, taking control of everything."

💃

8. Jessica Shortall: The American case for paid maternity leave

Author and activist Jessica Shortall's case for paid maternity leave, outlined in her TEDx Talk, will make you mad. And then it will make you act.Before they have kids, millennial woman out-earn their male counterparts. More women than ever (40%) are the primary breadwinners for their families.And yet America remains one of the last countries on Earth without some form of paid leave for new mothers:

"It is long since time for the most powerful country on Earth to offer national paid leave to the people doing the work of the future of this country and to the babies who represent that future. Childbirth is a public good. This leave should be state-subsidized. It should have no exceptions for small businesses, small business or entrepreneurs. It should be able to be shared between partners—I've talked today about mothers, but co-parents matter on so many levels. Not one more woman should have to go back to work while she is hobbling and bleeding. Not one more family should have to drain their savings account to buy a few days of rest and recovery and bonding."

👍

9. Anne Murphy Brown: Moms on the job

Anne Murphy Brown, author of Legally Mom and director of the Legal Studies Program at Ursuline College, shares her own journey as a mother and an attorney in this TEDx Talk.Giving an overview of the real-world challenges of being a working mom, especially for those who don't have paid leave, Brown advocates for major policy changed in the United States when it comes to motherhood. She reminds the audience:

"Working motherhood is here to stay."


This is my one trick to get baby to sleep (and it always works!)

There's a reason why every mom tells you to buy a sound machine.

So in my defense, I grew up in Florida. As a child of the sunshine state, I knew I had to check for gators before sitting on the toilet, that cockroaches didn't just scurry, they actually flew, and at that point, the most popular and only sound machine I had ever heard of was the Miami Sound Machine.

I was raised on the notion that the rhythm was going to get me, not lull me into a peaceful slumber. Who knew?!

Well evidently science and, probably, Gloria Estefan knew, but I digress.

When my son was born, I just assumed the kid would know how to sleep. When I'm tired that's what I do, so why wouldn't this smaller more easily exhausted version of me not work the same way? Well, the simple and cinematic answer is, he is not in Kansas anymore.

Being in utero is like being in a warm, soothing and squishy spa. It's cozy, it's secure, it comes with its own soundtrack. Then one day the spa is gone. The space is bigger, brighter and the constant stream of music has come to an abrupt end. Your baby just needs a little time to acclimate and a little assist from continuous sound support.

My son, like most babies, was a restless and active sleeper. It didn't take much to jolt him from a sound sleep to crying like a banshee. I once microwaved a piece of pizza, and you would have thought I let 50 Rockettes into his room to perform a kick line.

I was literally walking on eggshells, tiptoeing around the house, watching the television with the closed caption on.

Like adults, babies have an internal clock. Unlike adults, babies haven't harnessed the ability to hit the snooze button on that internal clock. Lucky for babies they have a great Mama to hit the snooze button for them.

Enter the beloved by all—sound machines.

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