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When our little ones are teething and hurting, we do whatever we can to make them feel better. For years, many parents have turned to teething necklaces and bracelets to help relieve teething pain.

Now, the FDA is asking parents to stop using teething necklaces and bracelets.

The warning comes after an 18-month old died after being strangled by his amber teething necklace during a nap. in another case, a 7-month-old, who was under parental supervision at the time, choked on the beads of a wooden teething bracelet. Thankfully, the baby was taken to hospital and survived.

"We know that teething necklaces and jewelry products have become increasingly popular among parents and caregivers who want to provide relief for children's teething pain and sensory stimulation for children with special needs, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. said in a statement.

"We're concerned about the risks we've observed with these products and want parents to be aware that teething jewelry puts children, including those with special needs, at risk of serious injury and death," he explains.

The FDA's warning echoes previous calls from the American Academy of Pediatrics. The AAP doesn't recommend jewelry of any kind of babies. According to the AAP, claims that amber teething necklaces reduce pain, stimulate the thyroid glans or reduce inflammation are not backed up by scientific research, and the risks outweigh the benefits.

"The risk is two-fold—strangulation and choking," pediatrician Natasha Burgert explains via healthychildren.org.

Scott Gottlieb of the FDA says "consumers should consider following the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendations of alternative ways for treating teething pain, such as rubbing inflamed gums with a clean finger or using a teething ring made of firm rubber."

The FDA and the AAP both recommend parents do not use benzocaine teething gels as "benzocaine and other local anesthetics can cause methemoglobinemia, a serious condition in which the amount of oxygen carried through the blood is reduced."

Instead, the AAP suggests parents provide chew toys and cold things for baby to chew on, and talk to their pediatrician about whether acetaminophen is needed if those methods don't seem to be helping enough.

Everyone wants their teething baby to feel better, but we also want them to be safe.

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Motherhood is a practice in learning, growing and loving more than you ever thought possible. Even as a "veteran" mama of four young sons and one newly adopted teenager, Jalyssa Richardson enthusiastically adapts to whatever any given day has in store—a skill she says she's refined through the years.

Here's what just one day in her life looks like:


Jalyssa says she learned to embrace agility throughout her motherhood journey. Here's more from this incredible mama of five boys.

What is the most challenging part of your day as a mom of five?

Time management! I want to meet each of the boys' individual needs—plus show up for myself—but I often feel like someone gets overlooked.

What's the best part of being a mom of five?

The little moments of love. The hugs, the kisses, the cuddles, the smiles... they all serve as little reminders that I am blessed and I'm doing okay.

Are there misconceptions about raising boys?

There are so many misconceptions about raising boys. I think the biggest one is that boys don't have many emotions and they're just so active all the time. My boys display many emotions and they also love to be sweet and cuddly a lot of the time.

What do you think would surprise people the most about being a mom of five?

How much I enjoy it. I never knew I wanted to be a mom until I was pregnant with my first. My desire only grew and the numbers did! I am surprised with every single baby as my capacity to love and nurture grows. It's incredible.

How do you create balance and make time for yourself?

Balance for me looks like intentional planning and scheduling because I never want my boys to feel like they aren't my first priority, but it is extremely difficult. What I try to do is not fit it all into one day. I have work days because motherhood is my first priority. I fit in segments of self-care after the kids' bedtime so I don't grow weary.

What's the biggest lesson you have learned from motherhood?

I have learned that sacrifice is actually beautiful. I was terrified of the selflessness motherhood would require, but I've grown so much through the sacrifice. There is nothing better than living for something bigger than myself.

When did you first feel like a mom? How has your motherhood evolved?

I first felt like a mom when I was pregnant with my first son and I intentionally chose to change my eating habits so my body could be strong and healthy for him. I didn't have to think twice—I just did what I thought would be best for him. That decision being so effortless made me realize I was made for motherhood.

My perspective has changed with each baby as I've realized motherhood doesn't have to be one-size-fits-all. With my first son, I was a by-the-book mama and it was so stressful. With each baby, I have felt more freedom and it has made motherhood so much more beautiful. I have evolved into the mother that they need, I am perfect for these boys.

This article was sponsored by Dr. Brown's. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.


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