If you haven't heard Pink's new song with her daughter—7-year-old Willow—yet, you're gonna want to watch the video below.

But we're warning you, you might want to grab a Kleenex first. These two don't just share a musical talent, they share an incredible bond comes through in the behind-the-scenes look at the recording of this song, "A Million Dreams", from the film "The Greatest Showman."

The musical (about legendary circus showman P.T. Barnum) stars Hugh Jackman and Michelle Williams, and Pink and Willow love the movie (it came out in 2017).

"You made our favorite movie ever," Pink tells the film's songwriters during the recording session.

Pink and Willow lent their voices to a new album inspired by the movie.

"The Greatest Showman — Reimagined" drops November 16 and features the film's songs redone by artists like Pink, Kelly Clarkson, Panic! At The Disco, The Zac Brown Band and Kesha.

Pink is a proud mama  

The video of Pink and Willow totally owning "A Million Dreams" (which is sung by Hugh Jackman in the movie) isn't just powerful because they both having amazing voices and incredible talent, but also because Pink and Willow are sharing something special.

When Willow sings her part of the track her mom is right there, down on her knees at Willow's level, coaching and encouraging her through every note.

When Willow totally nails it, Pink gives her a big thumbs up.

As mamas, we recognize that look in Pink's eyes: That's pride and it's pure love.

"You're fun," Pink jokes with Willow at the beginning of the video. "I'm glad I had you."

The power of music 

When your mom can sing like Pink, obviously some of that talent is likely to trickle down, but hanging out with mama in the studio isn't just nurturing Willow (very obvious) talent—it's also nurturing her brain.

A recent study on the effect of musical training on 6 and 7 year olds suggests that when kids get some musical training it can boost brain development and sound processing. As little as two years of training can make a big difference, and help improve decision-making.

Even if you can't sing like Pink, your child can still benefit from musical training. And, taking a music class together can bring parents and kids together. You and your kids may not be able to hit the notes the way Pink and Willow do, but any mama can bond with her babies over music.

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In fact, it's quite the opposite. Mental strength is what helps kids bounce back from setbacks. It gives them the strength to keep going, even when they're plagued with self-doubt. A strong mental muscle is the key to helping kids reach their greatest potential in life.

But raising a mentally strong kid requires parents to avoid the common yet unhealthy parenting practices that rob kids of mental strength. In my book, 13 Things Mentally Strong Parents Don't Do, I identify 13 things to avoid if you want to raise a mentally strong kid equipped to tackle life's toughest challenges:

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