Singer Rachel Platten is best known for her hit "Fight Song," and she's spent the last few days fighting back for any pregnant mama who's ever been on the receiving end of unwelcome comments about her gestating body.

It started with an Instagram post in which the 37-year-old—who is expecting her first child with her husband, Kevin Lazan—relayed an experience so many moms can relate to.

"hi so yesterday an (excited) acquaintance told me 'wow your hips and butt look way bigger! So cool!'...then I cried for 30 minutes. Because i've also noticed my body changing because DUH I'm making a human but I'm like "oh I'm being hard on myself no one can tell," she wrote.

For some reason, people feel comfortable commenting on the bodies of pregnant women in a way they wouldn't remark about the bodies of non-pregnant people. Sometimes sensitivity goes out the window and Plattan's post, which now has almost 25,000 likes on Instagram, proves that plenty of women think society needs a little reminder on the appropriate way to speak.

In an interview with Good Morning America, Platten explained a social phenomenon pregnant mamas are all too familiar with. "I think what happens is that people look at this as this really exciting thing happening to a woman and all of a sudden see it as an objective thing and it's no longer part of the woman's body and it's public property [that they can talk about] and people forget you're the same sensitive person attached to it," she said.

We should never forget that there is a person with feelings attached to that cute baby bump, and they may not be feeling particularly cute when they're dealing with weight gain, swollen ankles and the rest of it.

It's honestly never nice or appropriate to comment on someone else's weight or body, whether they're pregnant or not. Sometimes comments are well meaning, but it's just not cool judge someone else's body.

Platten's week of viral body positivity is helping people understand that, and that's great news whether you're pregnant or not. She's hoping others will now think twice before commenting on another person's weight or shape.

"For so long i have had to keep my body a certain way and it's NICE and freeing to just let it do what it needs to and I'm proud that I'm letting my baby get all the nourishment it needs. BUT....Can we just put it out there that it is never cool to tell any woman their ass got bigger (or smaller). Just don't comment," she wrote on Instagram.

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