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Report: President Trump plans to choose Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

What you need to know about this mom of 7.

Report: President Trump plans to choose Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

When Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg died on Friday her spot on the Supreme Court was vacated and on Monday President Trump said he is prepared to make his third U.S. Supreme Court nomination this week. "I will announce it either Friday or Saturday," Trump said on Fox News, adding, "We should wait until the services are over for Justice Ginsburg."

Now, CNN reports President Trump plans to choose Judge Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court Nomination. He is expected to make the announcement on Saturday.

According to CNN, senior Republican sources are "indicating that Barrett is the intended nominee... All sources cautioned that until it is announced by the President, there is always the possibility that Trump makes a last-minute change but the expectation is Barrett is the choice."

President Trump says a vote on this Supreme Court nominee should come before the upcoming presidential election (a move that goes against Ginsberg's last wishes—and the precedent set by the senate in 2016). The President previously said he was looking seriously at five candidates for the spot, but during his Fox News interview on Monday, he only mentioned two: Amy Coney Barrett and Barbara Lagoa.

Here's what you need to know about Amy Coney Barrett


Judge Amy Coney Barrett is a circuit judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. President Trump has said he prefers a young person for the vacant SCOTUS post and at 48, Barrett fits the bill.

If she gets the seat, Barrett would be the youngest justice on the Supreme Court.

A mother of seven, Barrett became a parent through pregnancy and adoption. Barrett was nominated by President Trump for the appellate court for the Seventh Circuit in 2017 and made history as the first woman to occupy an Indiana seat on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. A professor of law at and graduate of Notre Dame, Barrett clerked for the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Some Democrats are worried that Barrett could vote to overturn Roe v. Wade if she makes it to the Supreme Court as she has previously defended overturning precedents.

Judge Barrett's dissenting opinion in a 2019 case is also notable. The case saw the Seventh Circuit rejected a challenge by Rickey Kanter, whose 2011 mail fraud conviction meant he was banned from possessing firearms for life. The Seventh ruled against Kanter's argument that federal and state laws preventing felons from owning firearms are unconstitutional, but Barrett dissented, stating that banning non-violent felons from owning guns treats the Second Amendment as a second-class right.

Barrett is a devout Catholic and a member of People of Praise, a multi-denominational Christian organization.

[A version of this post was first published September 21. It has been updated.]

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