Times are changing Britain's monarchy and you don't have to look further than the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's 2019 Christmas card for proof.

Kensington Palace posted Will and Kate's annual holiday photo on Instagram and it is candid, casual and super cute. The only thing that's missing is Kate (who was behind the camera, taking the photo).

The Duchess snapped the family photo earlier this year in Norfolk. The black and white image shows The Duke of Cambridge kissing Prince Louis while Princess Charlotte and Prince George look into their mama's camera lens.

Unlike in previous holiday photos, the Cambridge family is not dressed similarly. The Duke and Prince Louis are the most formally attired of the bunch, while Princess Charlotte is sporting a backpack, a parka, a dress and leggings. The weather must have been a bit confusing that day because Prince George is wearing a zip-up fleece with shorts and bare legs. It is a very authentic look for a 6-year-old.

The kids kind of look like they dressed themselves, which may be why their mom likes this photo so much. It's casual and real, which seems to be part of the evolution of the Cambridge's Christmas photos.

The 2018 Christmas card 

Last year's card was shot by photographer Matt Porteous, the family shot captures the royal kids, Prince George, then 5, Princess Charlotte, then 3, and baby Prince Louis were absolutely adorable while sitting on a tree with mom and dad.

The vibe was casual, with Prince George standing on one foot and Prince William leaving the top couple buttons of his plaid shirt undone.

Prince Louis (then 8 months old) was a total star in tights and shorts.

While this is hardly the first candid shot of the royal family, the 2018 year's Christmas card is a pretty big departure from 2017's, which was shot further in advance than this one and was more formal in every way.

The 2017 Christmas card 

The 2017 card was more of a portrait than a candid shot and the wardrobe choices were very royal. The photo was taken at Kensington palace but the all white background obscures the setting. The kids look adorable, but also old-fashioned and formal in this pic.

It's still more lively than royal portraits of the past, thanks in large part to Prince George who looks like he was in constant motion during this shoot (as most kids that age are).

The 2016 card 

The very formal 2017 card was more official looking than the family's 2016 card, which featured a candid shot, again by royal photographer Chris Jackson. Prince George was a mere preschooler and Princess Charlotte was only a toddler in the photo, snapped during a visit to Canada.

While the little ones were impeccably dressed for royal duties they were very much just curious kids interested in a performer making balloon animals.

The 2015 card

And back in 2015 a young Prince George was again wearing shorts for the family Christmas card, which was more formal than this years but still showed the royals were moving in a more authentic direction when it comes to family photos. One of the baby's shoes has fallen off and there is a toy in the shot (oh and not everyone is looking at the camera).

This Cambridge's first card as a family of four proved that when you're trying to get a good pic of the kids, sometimes the shot where the baby is shoeless is the best pic.

The 2013 and 2014 cards 

Before the 2015 card Prince George had been an only child, so he's the only kid on the 2013 and 2014 cards...and he sure did look cute!

The Cambridge's first Christmas card as parents featured a photo of the three of them taken when Prince George was christened earlier that year. The next year the couple chose a more candid shot from when they visited the Sensational Butterflies exhibition at the Natural History Museum.

[A version of this post was originally published December 14, 2018. It has been updated.]

Having a newborn is challenging at the best of times, but during forced isolation and in a climate of fear and uncertainty, it can become overwhelming.

The coronavirus pandemic is setting up our communities for genuine mental health concerns. This may be especially true for new parents. When will 'normal' life return? How will I pay for diapers and baby food? Will my mom be able to help us now? What if my baby or my family get COVID-19? Unfortunately, no one knows the long-term impact or answers just yet.

Most families have built a network of social support by the time they have their first child—if they don't already have a support system, they develop one through various baby classes and groups set up for parents. The creation of the village can be instrumental to the mental health of new parents. Social distancing, the lockdown of cities, and isolation will inadvertently affect the type of support available.

Keep reading Show less
Our Partners