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Please read this in the event you have to save my kid’s life with an EpiPen

In season two, episode one, of Showtime's series, Billions, Lara Axelrod is at her children's school when she spots a small crowd of kids gathered around a girl lying on the floor outside the nurse's office.


The girl struggles for breath, her face is covered in red blotchy spots, and her forehead dotted with perspiration. The nurse is on the phone calling emergency personnel, saying the girl came into her office complaining of nausea, then she vomited. The nurse tells Lara the girl is having a seizure.

She's in anaphylaxis," Lara says with certainty as she kneels next to the girl and searches her backpack for the girl's EpiPen. Lara finds it while the camera focuses on her face and the squirming girl on the floor trying to breathe. She presses the Epipen into her thigh.

“Listen, you're having a reaction," Lara tells the girl, “but I gotchyou."

In the midst of this commotion, there's a moment when the viewer sees the nurse's eyes widen in horror as she realizes she failed to recognize anaphylaxis. The scene is particularly compelling because it touches on a universal fear most of us have—that we wouldn't know what to do if we were with someone else's child having a life-threatening allergic reaction.

The fear is understandable. When I first learned our first child was allergic to peanuts and tree-nuts and the concept of an EpiPen was new to me. I imagined scenarios of having to save his young life, raising my arm, EpiPen in hand, ready to jab his thigh to administer an injection of adrenaline as he clutched his throat with both hands.

I was relieved to learn you don't ever jab an EpiPen, but rather, hold it to the person's thigh and press.

I see a similar fear in the eyes of the parents of my son's friends when I drop him off to play at their house for the first time. I dread this moment. It's awkward. I try to defuse the moment by saying you probably won't use it, but he needs to have it with him just in case.

My wife and I have three children with food allergies and are fortunate they are not as severe as other children's reactions. We're fortunate that we've never had an episode.

At some point, active parents who volunteer in the community will be with children who have been prescribed an EpiPen because of allergies to bee stings, food, latex or another trigger. The idea of being with someone else's child experiencing a serious allergic reaction can be an overwhelming concept. Knowing the signs of anaphylaxis and how to administer an EpiPen can reduce some of the associative fear of using one.

“Some people hesitate to give the EpiPen because they are unsure if a serious reaction is happening," says Dr. Jalkut, M.D., of Pediatric Healthcare Associates. “Many parents ask if they can give Benadryl and wait and see before giving epinephrine."

Especially if the child has had a reaction before, and an adult suspects a serious allergic reaction, “it is imperative that epinephrine be given as soon as possible." Dr. Jalkut stresses that “epinephrine helps to give time to get to the hospital. Benadryl is not a substitute for epinephrine."

Know the signs of anaphylaxis

Some indications can vary and reactions can take many forms, but you should take the following symptoms seriously:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Hoarse voice or wheezing
  • Hives, a raised rash that itches
  • Severe itching or flushed (red) skin
  • Swelling of face, lips, mouth, or tongue
  • Fast heart beat
  • Weak pulse
  • Feeling very anxious
  • Confusion
  • Vomiting and abdominal pain

“Another clear sign of anaphylaxis is if symptoms involve two systems," says Jalkut, “like hives and vomiting, or wheezing and abdominal pain."

The nurse in the scene from Billions made an especially egregious error when you consider the girl having the allergic reaction exhibited multiple signs from two systems. If you suspect a child is going into anaphylaxis, first call 911 then administer the injection.

How to administer an epinephrine auto-injector

  1. Flip open the cap and slide the EpiPen out of the tube.
  2. Pop off the blue cap, keeping your hand away from the orange tip where the needle comes out.
  3. Form a fist around the EpiPen. Hold the child's leg in place with your free hand. Place the orange tip to the side of the child's thigh and press until you feel and hear a click. Hold in place for three seconds.
  4. Release the EpiPen and massage the place where the injection occurred for 10 seconds.

Remember: Anytime a child has received an EpiPen, they need to go to the hospital afterwards to make sure everything is okay. Despite the valid anxiety that lives in the mind of most guardians, you will be equipped to react to a child in anaphylaxis like Lara Axelrod if you remember the signs and the simple steps of how to use an EpiPen.

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Mamas, if you hire a cleaning service to tackle the toddler fingerprints on your windows, or shop at the neighborhood grocery store even when the deals are better across town, don't feel guilty. A new study by the University of British Columbia and Harvard Business School shows money buys happiness if it's used to give you more time. And that, in turn could be better for the whole family.

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As if we needed another reason to shop at Target, our favorite store is offering some great deals for mamas who need products for baby. Mom life can be expensive and we love any chance at saving a few bucks. If you need to stock up on baby care items, like diapers and wipes, now is the time.

Right now, if you spend $100 on select diapers, wipes, formula, you'll get a $20 gift card with pickup or Target Restock. Other purchases will get you $5 gift cards during this promotion:

  • $20 gift card when you spend $100 or more on select diapers, wipes, formula, and food items using in store Order Pickup, Drive Up or Target Restock
  • $5 gift card when you buy 3 select beauty care items
  • $5 gift card when you buy 2 select household essentials items using in store Order Pickup, Drive Up or Target Restock
  • $5 gift card when you buy 2 select Iams, Pedigree, Crave & Nutro dog and cat food or Fresh Step cat litter items using in store Order Pickup
  • $5 gift card when you buy 3 select feminine care items using in store Order Pickup, Drive Up or Target Restock

All of these promotions will only run through 11:59 pm PT on Saturday, January 19, 2019 so make sure to stock up before they're gone!

Because the deals only apply to select products and certain colors, just be sure to read the fine print before checking out.

Target's website notes the "offer is valid using in store Order Pickup, Drive Up or Target Restock when available".

The gift cards will be delivered after you have picked up your order or your Target Restock order has shipped.

We won't tell anyone if you use those gift cards exclusively for yourself. 😉 So, get to shopping, mama!

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This month isn't just the start of a new year, but the start of a new life for those due in 2019. If you're expecting a baby this year you've got plenty of celebrity company, mama.

Here are some fellow mamas-to-be expecting in 2019:

Alexa and Carlos PenaVega 

The Spy Kids actress and mom to 2-year-old Ocean will soon have to get herself a double stroller because PenaVega and her husband Carlos are expecting again.

"Holy Moly!!! Guys!!! We are having another baby!!!!" captioned an Instagram post. "Do we wake Ocean up and tell him??!! Beyond blessed and excited to continue growing this family!!! Get ready for a whole new set of adventures!!!"

Over on Carlos' IG the proud dad made a good point: " This year we will officially be able to say we have 'kids!' Our minds are blown," he write.

Jessa Duggar and Ben Seewald

In January Counting On Jessa Seewald (formerly Jessa Duggar) announced via Instagram that she is pregnant with her third child with husband Ben Seewald.

We love that she was able to make the announcement in her own time, not worrying about speculation about her midsection. She's been over that for a while.

[Update: January 18, added PenaVega]

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The shape appeals to kids and the organic and gluten-free labels appeal to parents in the freezer aisle, but if you've got a bag of Perdue's Simply Smart Organics Gluten Free Chicken Breast Nuggets, don't cook them.

The company is recalling 49,632 bags of the frozen, fully cooked Simply Smart Organics Gluten Free Chicken Breast Nuggets because they might be contaminated with wood.

According to the USDA, Perdue received three complaints about wood In the nuggets, but no one has been hurt.

The nuggets were manufactured on October 25, 2018 with a "Best By" date of October 25, 2019. The UPC code is 72745-80656. (The USDA provides an example of the packaging here so you'll know where to look for the code).


In a statement on the Perdue website the company's Vice President for Quality Assurance, Jeff Shaw, explains that "After a thorough investigation, we strongly believe this to be an isolated incident, as only a minimal amount of these packages has the potential to contain pieces of wood."

If you have these nuggets in your freezer you can call Perdue 877-727-3447 to ask for a refund.

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