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The ultimate maternity leave checklist: How to plan for your time off work

A printable checklist to leaving work behind for a few precious weeks (or months!).

The ultimate maternity leave checklist: How to plan for your time off work

You want to begin your maternity leave feeling great about your work life and home life so you can enjoy every moment at home with your new baby—and return to work later with confidence.


Inspired by some fabulous mama leaders (namely Dana Bash, Jewelyn Cosgrove, Nedra Pickler and Stephanie Weeks) who have done the maternity leave thing recently, and drawing on my own experience and the experiences of women I've coached, I've pulled together four categories of maternity leave to-dos to think about as you plan your time away.

Check these things off your list before baby arrives, and you'll be more than prepared. You'll be a mama!

1. Prep for your departure from work.

Check in with HR.

Your human resources department should be one of your first stops at the office when you announce your pregnancy. Find out what your company's leave policies are and what Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) forms you'll need to fill out.

Don't forget to ask about benefits, too. Will any retirement match you receive continue when you're on FMLA? How do you add your baby to your insurance? If your HR manager can't answer your questions, be calm but persistent. Not all HR departments are well-oiled machines when it comes to parental leave. Don't stop until you get all your questions answered.

Develop your maternity leave transition plan.

You'll need to start thinking about what your job entails, who will take over your responsibilities, how much time you'll take off, and how you'll transition back.

Think about putting your whole plan in one document like Jewelyn Cosgrove, associate director of federal government affairs for a national trade association, who got big props from her employer for the formal maternity leave plan she created.

Here are some key to-dos to get your maternity leave plan ready:

  • Document your processes and projects.
  • Discuss coverage options with your supervisor.
  • Plan for supervision and mentoring of your direct reports.
  • Carve out dedicated time to teach those who will be covering for you about what they'll need to do, and to introduce them to your key contacts.
  • Create an if-I-go-into-labor-at-work document with information about where you plan to deliver, the phone number of your OB-GYN, doula, midwife, etc., and emergency contact numbers, and share it with a few trusted colleagues.
  • Negotiate the duration of your leave. Stephanie Weeks, vice president at Blackboard, advises new mothers to “plan to take as much time as you possibly can off of work. As much as you love your job," she says, “all will be well without you, and you will feel more confident going back with more time at home."
  • Explore phased-in reentry and flexible work options for your return. Ask for flexible options on a trial basis to help your employer feel comfortable.
  • Develop a communication plan with your office for while you are on leave that outlines whether and when you plan to check in. Weeks recommends designating “someone at work you trust to keep you 'in the loop' with what's going on at work, so you can totally disconnect electronically but still feel like you have a line to anything big that may change while you're out."
  • Block out breast pumping time on your calendar now. If you have an Outlook calendar and some control over your schedule, consider blocking out six months or a year's worth of pumping time now. (I blocked three 30-minute periods per day.) If you wind up not needing the time, it's easy to delete the calendar appointments, but it's hard to get that time back if others schedule you to be elsewhere.
  • Build your leave and return into your work goals. As you can tell just from this checklist, a well-planned and executed leave and reentry is no small feat. Take credit for all the hard work you're doing to leave and return in a thoughtful and professional manner by talking to your manager about how you might build maternity leave planning into your goals and your evaluation process.

2. Get ready for baby.

Get your gear in gear.

You already know babies seem to require warehouses full of gear. I remember laughing about how, in the first week of his life, my baby had more seating options in our one-bedroom condo than I did. Ask friends who already have children to help you put together a registry to weed out the useful from the useless.

And check out Baby Bargains, which is a bit like the Consumer Reports of baby stuff. However, don't stress too much if the crib of your dreams won't arrive in time or if you can't put the finishing touches on a nursery. Neither of my little guys slept in a crib in until a few months after their arrival on the scene.

Explore childcare options.

Nedra Pickler, managing director at the Glover Park Group and former AP journalist covering the White House, explains, “Depending on where you live, you'll want to start researching childcare options early."

Talk to moms who have a variety of arrangements (think nanny, nanny share, au pair, day care center, in-home day care, family) to get their perspectives. And if you're going the day care center route, be prepared for a scramble.

“Here in Washington, you need to get on a day care waitlist during pregnancy if you can," the mom of two says. “I thought that sounded nuts when I was pregnant, but it's true."

While you're pregnant, space out your visits to day care centers (my husband and I toured one a month) to avoid overwhelm. And then when you're on maternity leave, “you need to work those waitlists like a job and network," Pickler says.

“Those things are not really run in order and can be kind of a racket—the order of admission is totally up to the staff. I would go on tours to meet as many members of the staff as I could and check in regularly with the director. I made sure they knew I would be an involved parent and would bring them a deposit check the moment they had an opening."

Be sure to follow up interactions with thank-you notes too, Pickler advises. “One day care center called to offer my baby a spot immediately, admitting they leaped our family to the head of the line because they appreciated the handwritten thank-you note."

Line up a pediatrician.

It's helpful to select a pediatrician before your baby arrives for two reasons. First, they will plan to visit your baby right after birth. Second, some pediatricians accept only newborns into their practices. Get recommendations from friends and colleagues, and go meet with them to get a feel for their office and style. (Yes, you'll probably get charged for this visit, but it's worth it.)

Explore pumping equipment + lactation consultants.

It's good to know where you can go for pumping gear and help with breastfeeding, because sometimes when you need help feeding your baby, you wind up scrambling to find someone! Lose that worry by locating lactation consultants (LCs) recommended by friends, or check out Yelp reviews of LCs nearby.

Many pediatricians can also point you in the right direction. If you will be nursing, explore different pumps and features (wireless, backpack models, etc.) to figure out what you'll need for your lifestyle.

Prepare for delivery.

Make sure your significant other knows the route to your hospital or birthing center, take some birth and baby classes, and pack the trunk of your car. Explore whether hiring a doula makes sense for you. And, of course, if you have other children, don't forget to come up with some options for who can watch them when the big day arrives.

Keep an open mind.

Above all, Stephanie Weeks recommends “being open to doing things differently" than you might otherwise have imagined.

“From birthing methods to feeding choices to childcare, there are so many options. You truly cannot know what's best for you and your family until it's time," she says.

3. Take care of YOU, mama.

Do not (I repeat, DO NOT) make to-do lists for during your leave.

CNN correspondent Dana Bash learned this lesson the hard way. “Given my Type A personality," she said, “I made a long to-do list for my time off. Make scrapbooks, organize the garage—all the things I never have time to do."

But did she have time for any of this? You guessed it: “Once the baby came, I realized that was all a pipe dream. As a semi-competent older mom, I thought handling a baby would be manageable," Bash said. But she admits she was wrong. “I was all-consumed and totally at a loss by how to handle my little 6-pound miracle."

Bash was lucky, though, that a friend came to the rescue to bring her maternity leave expectations “down to earth." Her friend explained to her that she should “set a goal for one basic task per day (I mean basic, like doing laundry or showering), and if you can do that, it's a successful day."

All that said, don't be afraid to line up a few things you'd like to watch on Netflix, some books you'd like to read, or some apps you want to explore for that inevitable baby-feeding downtime.

Brainstorm ways to make your life easier post-baby.

Think about ways that you can delegate and automate processes. Buy a slow cooker. (Or, my favorite kitchen appliance, the four-in-one slow cooker, rice cooker, oatmeal maker and veggie steamer.) Check out Motherly's roundup of the five kitchen products every new mom needs.

Extra sets of hands can be lifesavers during this time, so explore food delivery options, research baby nurses and postpartum doulas, and see if there's a local teenager you can recruit to be a parents' helper a few hours a week.

Relish the final weeks.

Pickler recommends that expectant mamas “take as much time to pamper themselves as they can in the final weeks," given that life is about to be completely consumed with caring for another human being.

“I made sure to schedule plenty of time to sleep," she said, “and used my lunch hour to go for a short swim at the local indoor pool. It was glorious to feel weightless for 20 minutes."

And if you're able to take any time off for yourself pre-baby, Pickler encourages you to go for it. She used that time “to exchange baby gifts that we got in duplicate and to get more of that precious sleep with a daily nap."

Make micro self-care a daily habit.

When baby arrives, of course, time for yourself takes on an entirely new (and relatively nonexistent) meaning. Now, while you are pregnant, is the time to make small acts of self-care a daily habit, so you can maintain some sanity after the baby arrives.

Explore what fills you up. Journal about it. And find things that can calm you down and recharge you in under five minutes. For me, that's stretching and setting an intention for my day while I'm in the shower.

4. Connect to community.

Make some new mama friends.

One of the most important things women who are about to go on leave can do, Pickler says, is to “make friends who have babies born close to the same time." How to do this? Pickler advises women to research play groups, new-mom support groups at your hospital, baby yoga classes, even the nursing room at a department store you visit.

“You need someone to talk to who is going through the same experiences," she says. A lot of these experiences can seem strange, “and you wonder if you are crazy. But if you have friends with babies close in age, they likely will be going through the same things."

She also notes that “if their baby is a couple months older or younger, they may be in a different phase and not even clearly remember that new thing you are experiencing." Weeks couldn't agree more. “Take a class or join a support group!" she said emphatically. And be sure to think about both in-person and online communities. (I teach the Mindful Return e-course to help women prepare for the transition back to work.)

Connect with other parents at work.

Are there already supportive communities for parents at your office? If so, connect. If not, consider starting one. I founded a “Returning to Work Community" at my office after my second child and we connected through monthly brown-bag lunches.

Also consider putting lunch on the books for your first day back at the office with a colleague who is also a parent and can relate to the transition.

Get family + friends on the same page.

The world will likely be dying to meet your little cherub, and watching your family and friends bond with baby can be magical. Have serious discussions with your partner, though, about when and how often you'd like visitors.

(My husband and I had a weeklong no-fly zone after our first baby, which we loved, but were quicker to accept visitors and help after our second.) Once you agree on a visiting plan, communicate it to your circle.

Final words of wisdom

Want the honest truth?

Whether you get through this checklist or not before baby arrives, you're going to be just fine, mama. Our little ones have a way of surprising us with their arrival dates, so know that whatever you've done is enough.

My last piece of advice is this: Once your baby arrives, throw all to-do lists—including this one—out the window, and just love love love that little baby.

Join Motherly

We're so glad to live in a time when modern baby gear exists. Sure, no one is going to argue that having a baby is easy—but it can be easier with support from some gadgets designed to help your baby and put your mind at ease.

As you build your baby registry, look for products that go the extra mile to make your life a whole lot easier. For example, what's better than a bassinet? A bassinet that can rock by itself. And what's better than a traditional baby monitor? One that allows you to actually take a peek at your baby. Believe us when we say these upgrades can make all the difference.

Here are 10 baby gadgets that will make your life so much easier… relatively speaking, of course!


A bassinet to promote safe + sound sleep

HALO Innovations Bassinest Swivel Sleeper Essenta Series Nautical Net

The safest place for your newborn to sleep is in your room, but not in your bed. Thanks to the swivel function of the Halo Bassinest, you can easily tend to your baby during the night—which means more sleep for you, too. Trust us when we say that is the best gift you can give a new parent.

$239.99

A smart swing for your baby

4moms mamaRoo 4 Bluetooth Enabled High-Tech Baby Swing - Classic

Believe it or not, many babies are born with strong opinions about how they want to be rocked, swung or shushed to calm down. With the mamaRoo's various motions and reclining positions, you'll be able to find a setting your baby loves when you need to free up your hands for a bit.

$219.99

A complete travel system for car + sidewalk

Chicco Bravo Travel System - Indigo

No matter where the day takes you—or what mode of transportation you need to get there—getting a complete travel system for your baby will equip you for anything.

$379.99

A swaddle you don’t have to wrestle

Love To Dream Swaddle UP Original

What do babies and Harry Houdini have in common? A knack for breaking out of tight constraints—which can be a headache when swaddling is the best way to help promote good sleep. Thanks to a breakout-proof swaddle that allows your baby to sleep with their hands up, you don't have to work up a sweat just to get your baby comfortably swaddled.

$29.99

A nursery wherever you need it

Baby Trend Lil Snooze Deluxe II Nursery Center

During the early days of parenting (when you are feeding and changing your baby around the clock), having convenient access to everything you need with a go-anywhere nursery station can save you serious time and energy.

$99.99

A little help for stuffy noses

Fridababy NoseFrida Nasal Aspirator

Up until the point years down the road when your child is able to blow their own nose, the sniffles can be a real struggle—but not with a nasal aspirator that makes it easy for you to get that snot out of their nose.

$15.99

A way to keep an eye on your baby

VTech 5" Digital Video Baby Monitor - VM5251

Trust us when we say you'll sleep better when you know your baby is also sleeping soundly. That's why we're so thankful for modern-day video monitors, which allow you to check in on your sleeping baby without running the risk of waking them up when you sneak in for a peek.

$79.99

A bassinet for hands-free rocking

Simmons Kids Silent Auto Gliding Elite Bassinet - Odyssey

Babies are soothed by rocking motions. But what does that mean for you if you can't rock them throughout the night? With an auto-gliding bassinet, they can comfortably drift off to sleep... and continue snoozing.

$99.99

An easy way to contain diaper smells

Diaper Genie Expressions Pail

Sometimes it's the little conveniences that make a big difference in the quality of your day-to-day life. That's why a great diaper pail should not be undervalued: By containing the smell, you will save yourself dozens upon dozens of trips to the garbage can.

$24.99

A white noise machine that pulls double duty

Hatch Rest Sound Machine, Night Light & Time-to-Rise

A phone-controlled sound machine may be something you never considered until now, but it will be a major lifesaver for years to come, especially as it can also function as a time-to-rise clock that promotes good sleep habits for your child.

$59.99

And as for securing all these awesome products? Well, a Target baby registry is the way to do it. By creating your baby registry with Target, you will also enjoy their Year of Benefits registry program, which includes perks like a welcome kit with more than $100 in savings and samples, two 15% off coupons to complete your registry, and a full year of returns. The benefits are better than ever right now: Target just launched the Year of Exclusive Deals perk as one of its registry benefits, and this includes a year's worth of discounts on baby essentials (think diapers and formula) and comes complementary when you sign up for Target Circle.

Because while parenting may not be "easy," deciding to register with Target definitely is an easy decision. Start your Target baby registry now and enjoy shopping with a Year of Benefits featuring a Year of Exclusive Deals available via Target Circle, two 15% off coupons, a year of hassle-free returns, a free welcome kit and more!

This article was sponsored by Target. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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14 outdoor toys your kids will want to play with beyond summer

They transition seamlessly for indoor play.

With Labor day weekend in the rearview and back-to-school in full swing, most parents are fresh out of boxes to check on their "Fun Concierge" hit list. It's also the point of diminishing returns on investing in summer-only toys. So with that in mind, we've rounded up some of our favorite toys that are not only built to last but will easily make the transition from outdoor to indoor play. Even better, they're Montessori-friendly and largely open-ended so your kids can get a ton of use out of them.

From sunny backyard afternoons to rainy mornings stuck inside, these toys are sure to keep little ones engaged and entertained.

Meadow ring toss game

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Besides offering a fantastic opportunity to hone focus, coordination, determination and taking turns, lawn games are just plain fun. Set them up close together for the littles and spread them out when Mom and Dad get in on the action. With their low profile and rope rings, they're great for indoors as well.

$30

Balance board

Plan Toys balance board

Balance boards are a fabulous way to get the wiggles out. This one comes with a rope attachment, making it suitable for even the youngest wigglers. From practicing their balance and building core strength to working on skills that translate to skateboarding and snowboarding, it's a year-round physical activity that's easy to bring inside and use between Zoom classes, too!

$75

Detective set

Plan Toys detective setDetective Set

This set has everything your little detective needs to solve whatever mystery they might encounter: an eye glasses, walkie-talkie, camera, a red lens, a periscope and a bag. Neighborhood watch? Watch out.

$40

Wooden doll stroller

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Take their charges on a stroll around the block with this classic doll stroller. With the same versatility they're used to in their own ride, this heirloom quality carriage allows their doll or stuffy to face them or face the world.

$120

Sand play set

Plan Toys sand set

Whether you're hitting the beach or the backyard sandbox, this adorable wooden sand set is ready for action. Each scoop has an embossed pattern that's perfect for sand stamping. They're also totally suitable for water play in the wild or the bathtub.

$30

Water play set

Plan Toys water play set

Filled with sand or water, this tabletop sized activity set keeps little ones busy, quiet and happy. (A mama's ideal trifecta 😉). It's big enough to satisfy their play needs but not so big it's going to flood your floors if you bring the fun inside on a rainy day.

$100

Mini golf set

Plan Toys mini golf set

Fore! This mini golf set is lawn and living room ready. Set up a backyard competition or incorporate into homeschooling brain breaks that shift focus and build concentration.

$40

Vintage scooter balance bike

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Pedals are so 2010. Balance bikes are the way to go for learning to ride a bike while skipping the training wheels stage altogether. This impossibly cool retro scooter-style is built to cruise the neighborhood or open indoor space as they're learning.

$121

Wooden rocking pegasus

plan toys wooden rocking pegasus

Your little will be ready to take flight on this fun pegasus. It gently rocks back and forth, but doesn't skimp on safety—its winged saddle, footrests and backrest ensure kids won't fall off whether they're rocking inside or outside.

$100

Croquet set

Plan Toys croquet set

The cutest croquet set we've ever seen! With adorable animal face wooden balls and a canvas bag for easy clean up, it's also crafted to stick around awhile. Round after round, it's great for teaching kiddos math and problem-solving skills as well.

$45

Wooden digital camera

fathers factory wooden digital camera

Kids get the chance to assemble the camera on their own then can adventure anywhere to capture the best moments. With two detachable magnetic lenses, four built-in filters and video recorder, your little photographer can tap into their creativity from summertime to the holidays.

$179

Wooden bulldozer toy

plan toys wooden bulldozer toy

Whether they're digging up sand in the backyad or picking up toys inside, kids can get as creative as they want picking up and moving things around. Even better? Its wooden structure means it's not an eye sore to look at wherever your digger drops it.

$100

Pull-along hippo

janod toys pull along hippo toy

There's just something so fun about a classic pull-along toy and we love that they seamlessly transition between indoor and outdoor play. Crafted from solid cherry and beechwood, it's tough enough to endure outdoor spaces your toddler takes it on.

$33

Baby forest fox ride-on

janod toys baby fox ride on

Toddlers will love zooming around on this fox ride-on, and it's a great transition toy into traditional balance bikes. If you take it for a driveway adventure, simply use a damp cloth to wipe down the wheels before bringing back inside.

$88

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10 photos to take on baby’s first day that you'll cherish forever

You'll obsess over these newborn baby pictures.

Bethany Menzel: Instagram + Blog

As you're preparing for baby's birth, we bet you're dreaming of all of the amazing photos you'll take of your precious new babe. As a professional photographer and mama, I have some tips for newborn photos you'll want to capture.

Here are the 10 photos you will want to take on baby's first day.

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