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20 baby names that mean miracle—and will never go out of style

In these extraordinary times, we could all use some small miracles.

baby names that mean miracle
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Meaningful baby names will never go out of style. Whether you decide to name your newborn after a beloved family member, or are simply searching for a name that reflects the journey that led you to parenthood, whatever you choose will stick with you for the rest of your—and your child's—life.

Almost every parent, at some point, refers to their child as a "miracle," though the meaning of the word itself might differ depending on who you're talking to. Miracle is a beautiful word that can double as a name, but there are many other thoughtful baby names to choose from if you're considering giving your baby a name that suggests an extraordinary event, a gift from above or a rare wonder.

Whether you're looking for a familiar name with a miraculous history, such as Aaron, or you're searching for a unique name that means "rare miracle," such as Ender, there are so many choices for both girls and boys that are equally as meaningful as they are interesting. Choosing a baby name with the special meaning of "miracle" is a signal of hope and optimism—and in these extraordinary times, we could all use some small miracles.

Putting a unique twist on a beautiful classic isn't hard with these baby names that mean "miracle."


Aaron

A very common name of Hebrew origin, Aaron not only has a beautiful meaning ("exalted, holy"), but is also a go-to choice for many.

Alasne

Alasne is a very unique feminine Basque name meaning "miracle" that can be shortened into many nicknames including Allie, Ala, Las and more. The alternate spelling Alazne is equally lovely.

Amari

This gender-neutral name with African and Arabic roots means "miracle of God."

Ayah

This precious Arabic name meaning "miracle" is pulled from a verse in the Koran.

Eijaz

Somewhat similar to the common name Elijah, Eijaz is a strong Arabic name with the powerful meaning of "blessings" or "miracle."

Ender

This name meaning "very rare" or miracle derives from Turkish origin.

Harika

A Turkish name that isn't often heard, but boasts a beautiful meaning: "wonderful, miraculous."

Karishma

This pretty Indian name translates as "miracle," and can be shortened into the popular nickname Kari.

Loreto

This handsome Italian name is taken from a town in Italy called Lauretum, historically associated with miracles in the Catholic tradition.

Marvella

Marvella is a Spanish and Latin name that means "miracle to marvel at."

Milagros

Of Spanish origin, Milagros is taken from the phrase "Senora de los Milagros" which translates to "Woman of Miracles."

Milagro

The male version of Milagros is just as appealing and boasts the same strong meaning.

Mira

A shortened version of the word "Miracle," Mira is a short and sweet name with its own beautiful meanings according to Nameberry, including "admirable, peaceful."

Miracolo

The Italian word for miracle makes for a strong name for a little boy.

Nasia

This Hebrew name meaning "God's Miracle" is very feminine and rare.

Nathaniel

A sturdy, vintage-sounding boys name that often results in the nickname "Nate," Nathaniel means "gift from God."

Nessa

While some may think Nessa is pulled from the name Vanessa, it also stands strong on its own, meaning miracle in Hebrew.

Nissan

Similar to Nasia, Nissan is a male Hebrew name meaning "miracle."

Pelia

A unique feminine Hebrew name pronounced with the emphasis on the "li" syllable, Pelia means "miracle of God."

Theo

Theo, a timeless Greek name meaning "divine gift" or miracle, has been popular for decades for both boys and girls.

Celebrate the little miracles that motherhood is made of

"Actually, I can" bracelet

Your work every day as a mom is nothing short of a miracle—and this simple, elegant mantra bracelet helps remind you of all that you are capable of.

$35

Gold rainbow necklace

A rainbow charm represents many things, ranging from hope to dreams coming true to a celebration of diversity and promise. What better symbol of the miracle that is motherhood?

$85

"Just be" swaddle blanket set

Just Be: Be brave, be strong, be kind. From day one, wrap your little one with words of positive meaning. This breathable, lightweight muslin swaddle wrap gets softer with every wash.

$32
Sunday Citizen

I live in the Northeast and when I woke up this morning, my house was freezing. It had been in the mid 40's overnight and we haven't turned the heat on yet. Suddenly, my normal duvet felt too thin. The socks on my bare feet too non-existent. Winter is coming, and I'd been drinking rosés still pretending it was summer.

I couldn't put it off any longer. It was time to do my annual tradition of winterizing my home—and I don't mean making sure my pipes and walls have enough insulation (though obviously that's important too). I mean the act of evaluating every room and wondering if it has enough hygge to it.

If you've never heard of hygge, it's a Danish word that means a quality of coziness or contentment. And what better time to make sure you have moments of hygge all throughout your house than right now? As far as I'm concerned it's the only way to get through these dark winter months (even more so during a pandemic.)

So I went room by room (yes, even my 4-year-old's room) and swapped in, layered or added in these 13 products to get us ready for winter:

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Tips parents need to know about poor air quality and caring for kids with asthma

There are steps parents can take to keep their children as healthy as possible.

When wildfires struck the West Coast in September 2020, there was a lot for parents to worry about. For parents of children with asthma, though, the danger could be even greater. "There are more than 400 toxins that are present in wildfire smoke. That can activate the immune system in ways that aren't helpful by both causing an inflammatory response and distracting the immune system from fighting infection," says Amy Oro, MD, a pediatrician at Stanford Children's Health. "When smoke enters into the lungs, it causes irritation and muscle spasms of the smooth muscle that is around the small breathing tubes in the lungs. This can lead to difficulty with breathing and wheezing. It's really difficult on the lungs."

With the added concern of COVID-19 and the effect it can have on breathing, many parents feel unsure about how to keep their children protected. The good news is that there are steps parents can take to keep their children as healthy as possible.

Here are tips parents need to know about how to deal with poor air quality when your child has asthma.

Minimize smoke exposure.

Especially when the air quality index reaches dangerous levels, it's best to stay indoors as much as possible. You can find out your area's AQI at AirNow.gov. An under 50 rating is the safest, but between 100-150 is considered unhealthy for sensitive groups, such as children with asthma. "If you're being told to stay indoors, listen. If you can, keep the windows and doors closed," Oro says.

Do your best to filter the air.

According to Oro, a HEPA filter is your best bet to effectively clean pollutants from the air. Many homes are equipped with a built-in HEPA filter in their air conditioning systems, but you can also get a canister filter. Oro says her family (her husband and children all suffer from asthma) also made use of a hack from the New York Times and built their own filter by duct taping a HEPA furnace filter to the front of a box fan. "It was pretty disgusting what we accumulated in the first 20 hours in our fan," she says.

Avoid letting your child play outside or overly exert themselves in open air.

"Unfortunately, cloth masks don't do very much [to protect you from the smoke pollution]," Oro says. "You really need an N95 mask, and most of those have been allocated toward essential workers." To keep at-risk children safer, Oro recommends avoiding brisk exercise outdoors. Instead, set up an indoor obstacle course or challenge your family to jumping jacks periodically to keep everyone moving safely.

Know the difference between smoke exposure and COVID-19.

"COVID-19 can have a lot of the same symptoms—dry cough, sore throat, shortness of breath and chest pain could overlap. But what COVID and other viruses generally cause are fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea and body aches. Those would tell you it's not just smoke exposure," Oro says. When a child has been exposed to smoke, they often complain of a "scrape" in their throat, burning eyes, cough, shortness of breath, chest pain or wheezing. If the child has asthma, parents should watch for a flare of symptoms, such as coughing, wheezing or a tight sensation in their chest.

Unfortunately, not much is known about long-term exposure to wildfire smoke on a healthy or compromised immune system, but elevated levels of air pollution have been associated with increased COVID-19 rates. That's because whenever there's an issue with your immune system, it distracts your immune system from fighting infections and you have a harder time fighting off viruses. Limiting your exposure to wildfire smoke is your best bet to keep immune systems strong.

Have a plan in place if you think your child is suffering from smoke exposure.

Whatever type of medication your child takes for asthma, make sure you have it on-hand and that your child is keeping up with regular doses. Contact your child's pediatrician, especially if your area has a hazardous air quality—they may want to adjust your child's medication schedule or dosage to prevent an attack. Oro also recommends that, if your child has asthma, it might be helpful to have a stethoscope or even a pulse oximeter at home to help diagnose issues with your pediatrician through telehealth.

Most importantly, don't panic.

In some cases, social distancing and distance learning due to COVID may be helping to keep sensitive groups like children with asthma safer. Oro says wildfires in past years have generally resulted in more ER visits for children, but the most recent fires haven't seen the same results. "A lot of what we've seen is that the smoke really adversely affects adults, especially older adults over 65," Oro says. "Children tend to be really resilient."

This article was sponsored by Stanford Children's Health. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

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