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How to safely—and deliciously—introduce baby to solids 🍌

The big world of diverse food options is ahead of you—and that's definitely cause for celebration.

How to safely—and deliciously—introduce baby to solids 🍌

After months of nourishment on a liquid diet alone, the introduction of solid food is a monumental step for both parents and babies. Now, the big world of diverse food options is ahead of you—and that's definitely cause for celebration.

But if you're a bit uncertain about how to safely introduce solids to your baby's diet, that's understandable, too. While feeding baby formula or breastmilk is now something you can (almost literally) do in your sleep, graduating to baby food is fundamentally a bit more complicated, especially when you include questions about food allergies and what foods to begin introducing. "Introducing solids is a pleasurable time for baby, but it can also be nerve-wracking for a first-time parent," says Dawn Winkelmann, M.S., CCC-SLP.

Thankfully, like just about everything else with parenting, you'll catch on fast and then the real fun of family mealtimes can begin.

1. When to introduce solids

As exciting as it is to introduce solids, rushing into it can have some unintended consequences if baby doesn't get the nourishment they need from formula or breastmilk, isn't physically ready to consume solids or is turned off and refuses foods. On the other hand, waiting too long can have downsides of its own.

Weighing all of that, it's best to introduce solid foods to babies between the ages of 6 and 7 months. Although your child's individual pediatrician may greenlight some select foods sooner, the half-year mark is really when you can start the solid adventure.

But, as any parent quickly learns, all babies are different. Additional signs your baby may be ready for solids include the ability to sit unassisted, is roughly twice their birth weight and seems to show an interest in foods by reaching for them.

2. What early foods are good options

When it comes to introducing baby to new flavors and textures, slow and steady is the best game plan: By introducing foods one at a time, you will have the ability to tell if your child has any adverse reactions. Research also suggests that repetition (giving baby the same tastes several times a month) is a great way to get baby to accept the flavor. In other words: You may be able to avoid battles over eating broccoli down the road if you really give them the time to acclimate to the taste early on.

Some classic starter options include:

  • Avocado
  • Sweet potato
  • Pureed peas
  • Applesauce

Increasing research also suggests early introduction of some common allergens, such as peanut-based purees or finger foods, are actually in your best interest—but that's something your child's pediatrician can best provide guidance around.

3. What is Baby Led Weaning?

Along with which food to introduce is the question of how: Unlike spoon-feeding purees, an increasing number of parents are turning to Baby Led Weaning, the practice of allowing your child to explore foods—starting with soft options like bananas and graduating to harder foods as they age—with their own fingers.

When Baby Led Weaning, stocking up on mats from ezpz makes feeding less messy due to bowls and plates that self-seal to the surface. Better yet, securing the placeware to the surface at baby's midline also helps them self-feed safely and successfully as their fine motor skills tune up. (And, when they are ready for it, ezpz has the perfect first spoon, too!)

4. How to have fun with purees

If you decide to go the combo or puree route, you can still get creative in the kitchen by steaming and pureeing your own baby food—and can even mix early foods with formula or breastmilk to help your baby warm up to the flavor. To minimize mess, ezpz's surface-sealed bowls keep everything in place. (And later serve a helpful purpose when your baby starts experimenting with a spoon of their own.) You can even serve smooth purees in their Tiny Cup as a new way to experience the flavors.

As you go, don't be intimidated by adding seasoning to baby's purees after they've had the chance to acclimate to the food itself: cinnamon, cumin, tumeric and even chili powder (in small amounts) are great ways to further open the door to all the exciting foods your child will soon enough explore.

"Whether you are offering purees or thick sticks of food, make it less stressful by introducing colorful foods that are readily consumed by the entire family," says Winkelmann. "My favorite piece of advice when choosing how to feed baby is to make sure that it is a safe, trusting and fun feeding experience for the both of you!"

Although breastmilk or formula should still be their primary source of nutrition at 6 months of age; introducing solid food is an important aspect of feeding development. Make this transition to solids fun by giving a variety of flavors, baby-friendly recipes and parent-friendly tools like the placeware line from ezpz—and keep that camera handy for the adorably messy photo opportunities to follow.

Just for Motherly readers, ezpz is offering a 20% off discount site-wide from November 28-December 21. Just use the code MOTHERLY20 at checkout!

This article was sponsored by ezpz. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

By its very nature, motherhood requires some lifestyle adjustments: Instead of staying up late with friends, you get up early for snuggles with your baby. Instead of spontaneous date nights with your honey, you take afternoon family strolls with your little love. Instead of running out of the house with just your keys and phone, you only leave with a fully loaded diaper bag.

For breastfeeding or pumping mamas, there is an additional layer of consideration around when, how and how much your baby will eat. Thankfully, when it comes to effective solutions for nursing or bottle-feeding your baby, Dr. Brown's puts the considerations of mamas and their babies first with products that help with every step of the process—from comfortably adjusting to nursing your newborn to introducing a bottle to efficiently pumping.

With countless hours spent breastfeeding, pumping and bottle-feeding, the editors at Motherly know the secret to success is having dependable supplies that can help you feed your baby in a way that matches lifestyle.

Here are 9 breastfeeding and pumping products to help you no matter what the day holds.

Customflow™ Double Electric Breast Pump

Dr. Brown's electric pump

For efficient, productive pumping sessions, a double electric breast pump will help you get the job done as quickly as possible. Quiet for nighttime pumping sessions and compact for bringing along to work, this double pump puts you in control with fully adjustable settings.

$159.99

Hands-Free Pumping Bra

Dr. Brown''s hands free pumping bra

Especially in the early days, feeding your baby can feel like a pretty consuming task. A hands-free pumping bra will help you reclaim some of your precious time while pumping—and all mamas will know just how valuable more time can be!

$29.99

Manual Breast Pump with SoftShape™ Silicone Shield

Dr. Brown's manual breast pump

If you live a life that sometimes takes you away from electrical outlets (that's most of us!), then you'll absolutely want a manual breast pump in your arsenal. With two pumping modes to promote efficient milk expression and a comfort-fitted shield, a manual pump is simply the most convenient pump to take along and use. Although it may not get as much glory as an electric pump, we really appreciate how quick and easy this manual pump is to use—and how liberating it is not to stress about finding a power supply.

$29.99

Nipple Shields and Sterilization Case

Dr. Brown's nipple shields

There is a bit of a learning curve to breastfeeding—for both mamas and babies. Thankfully, even if there are some physical challenges (like inverted nipples or a baby's tongue tie) or nursing doesn't click right away, silicone nipple shields can be a huge help. With a convenient carry case that can be sterilized in the microwave, you don't have to worry about germs or bacteria either. 🙌

$9.99

Silicone One-Piece Breast Pump

Dr. Brown's silicone pump

When you are feeding your baby on one breast, the other can still experience milk letdown—which means it's a golden opportunity to save some additional milk. With a silent, hands-free silicone pump, you can easily collect milk while nursing.

$14.99

Breast to Bottle Pump & Store Feeding Set

After a lifetime of nursing from the breast, introducing a bottle can be a bit of a strange experience for babies. Dr. Brown's Options+™ and slow flow bottle nipples were designed with this in mind to make the introduction to bottles smooth and pleasant for parents and babies. As a set that seamlessly works together from pumping to storing milk to bottle feeding, you don't have to stress about having everything you need to keep your baby fed and happy either.

$24.99

Washable Breast Pads

washable breast pads

Mamas' bodies are amazingly made to help breast milk flow when it's in demand—but occasionally also at other times. Especially as your supply is establishing or your breasts are fuller as the length between feeding sessions increase, it's helpful to use washable nursing pads to prevent breast milk from leaking through your bra.

$8.99

Breast Milk Storage Bags

Dr. Brown's milk storage bags

The essential for mamas who do any pumping, breast milk storage bags allow you to easily and safely seal expressed milk in the refrigerator or freezer. Dr. Brown's™ Breast Milk Storage Bags take it even further with extra thick walls that block out scents from other food items and feature an ultra secure lock to prevent leaking.

$7.99


Watch one mama's review of the new Dr. Brown's breastfeeding line here:

This article was sponsored by Dr. Brown's. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

Our Partners

I never wanted to be a mom. It wasn't something I ever thought would happen until I fell madly in love with my husband—who knew very well he wanted children. While he was a natural at entertaining our nephews or our friends' kids, I would awkwardly try to interact with them, not really knowing what to say or do.

Our first pregnancy was a surprise, a much-wanted one but also a unicorn, "first try" kind of pregnancy. As my belly grew bigger, so did my insecurities. How do you even mom when you never saw motherhood in your future? I focused all my uncertainties on coming up with a plan for the delivery of my baby—which proved to be a terrible idea when my dreamed-of unmedicated vaginal birth turned into an emergency C-section. I couldn't even start motherhood the way I wanted, I thought. And that feeling happened again when I couldn't breastfeed and instead had to pump and bottle-feed. And once more, when all the stress from things not going my way turned into debilitating postpartum anxiety that left me not really enjoying my brand new baby.

As my baby grew, slowly so did my confidence that I could do this. When he would tumble to the ground while learning how to walk and only my hugs could calm him, I felt invincible. But on the nights he wouldn't sleep—whether because he was going through a regression, a leap, a teeth eruption or just a full moon—I would break down in tears to my husband telling him that he was a better parent than me.

Then I found out I was pregnant again, and that this time it was twins. I panicked. I really cannot do two babies at the same time. I kept repeating that to myself (and to my poor husband) at every single appointment we had because I was just terrified. He, of course, thought I could absolutely do it, and he got me through a very hard pregnancy.

When the twins were born at full term and just as big as singleton babies, I still felt inadequate, despite the monumental effort I had made to grow these healthy babies and go through a repeat C-section to make sure they were both okay. I still felt my skin crawl when they cried and thought, What if I can't calm them down? I still turned to my husband for diaper changes because I wasn't a good enough mom for twins.

My husband reminded me (and still does) that I am exactly what my babies need. That I am enough. A phrase that has now become my mantra, both in motherhood and beyond, because as my husband likes to say, I'm the queen of selling myself short on everything.

So when my babies start crying, I tell myself that I am enough to calm them down.

When my toddler has a tantrum, I remind myself that I am enough to get through to him.

When I go out with the three kids by myself and start sweating about everything that could go wrong (poop explosions times three), I remind myself that I am enough to handle it all, even with a little humor.


And then one day I found this bracelet. Initially, I thought how cheesy it'd be to wear a reminder like this on my wrist, but I bought it anyway because something about it was calling my name. I'm so glad I did because since day one I haven't stopped wearing it.

Every time I look down, there it is, shining back at me. I am enough.

I Am Enough bracelet 

SONTAKEY  I Am Enough Bracelet

May this Oath Bracelet be your reminder that you are perfect just the way you are. That you are enough for your children, you are enough for your friends & family, you are enough for everything that you do. You are enough, mama <3

$35

We independently select and share the products we love—and may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

Life

Becoming a mother has been life-changing. It's been hard, tiring, gratifying, beautiful, challenging, scary and a thousand other things that only a parent would ever understand.

It is these life-changing experiences that have inspired me to draw my everyday life as a stay at home mom. Whether it's the mundane tasks like doing laundry or the exciting moments of James', my baby boy's, first steps, I want to put it down on paper so that I can better cherish these fleeting moments that are often overlooked.

Being a stay-at-home-mom can be incredibly lonely. I like to think that by drawing life's simple moments, I can connect with other mothers and help them feel less alone. By doing this, I feel less alone, too. It's a win-win situation and I have been able to connect with many lovely parents and fellow parent-illustrators through my Instagram account.

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