Menu
Montessori at home: 10 tasks young kids can totally do on their own

"Help me do it myself" is a common phrase we try to remember in Montessori.

Young children crave independence. They are driven to achieve it from birth. If we can help them get there, we can minimize a lot of the struggles associated with toddlers and young children, and empower them to feel capable and confident in their growing abilities.

Because of Montessori's focus on independence, parents are often shocked when they see their children do certain things all by themselves at school. "My child never does this at home!" is a common response.

Here are some examples of things young Montessori children do for themselves, and how to encourage your own child to greater independence.

1. Get dressed

From the time children enter the Montessori toddler classroom at around 18 months old, they are encouraged to dress and undress by themselves. This happens in very slow stages, with undressing usually occurring first.

Montessori toddler teachers patiently show a child each step of dressing and undressing, from pushing down their pants to strapping the velcro on their shoe.

To try this at home, find times that are not rushed to practice with your child. Make sure the clothes and shoes are easy to get on and off. After you've shown them how a few times, sit nearby and offer the minimum amount of help they need to be successful. You might start with just a verbal reminder of what they need to do. He may be able to pull up the front of the pants, but need help with the back. Gradually, they'll need less and less help.

2. Wipe their nose

Montessori toddlers and young children have access to tissues and are encouraged to practice wiping their noses in front of a mirror so they can see when their face is clean. An adult may have to alert them that they need a tissue before they learn to complete the task alone.

Children can also take care of other basic self-care activities like washing their faces, drying their body after a bath, washing their own hands with soap, brushing their own hair, etc.

The job might not be done as quickly or as thoroughly, but empowering your child to take on these tasks raises their body awareness and helps his confidence grow with each new skill they develop.

3. Set the table

From the time they are walking, Montessori babies help set the table. This starts with something simple like bringing a plate to the table or bringing over their own lunchbox.

As the child grows, the process involves more steps, with the 3-6-year-olds setting their place with a napkin and placemat, glass plate, fork and spoon and a water cup.

To try this at home, use a low shelf to place a few dishes for your child. Show him how to carry each item carefully, one at a time with two hands, to his spot at the table. He may need a step stool to reach the dining table.

4. Clean the table and floor

Montessori children clean the tables and floor when they have made a mess by sweeping up any spills.

They also often choose to scrub a table or chair or mop the floor when there is no specific mess. The children enjoy the sensorial experience of the soap and water and experience a great sense of pride at seeing the results of their labor.

To try this at home, give your child a small broom and encourage them to help you sweep after meals. Give them a scrub brush and spend time scrubbing their outside toys together.

5. Put away their own toys

Montessori children are expected to put their own work and toys away, and they generally do so without reminders after becoming acclimated to the classroom.

Every item in the classroom has a specific spot where it belongs and the children quickly understand the expectation and social norm that everyone cleans up after himself.

To try this at home, ask your young child to put away a toy when he is done with it before he gets out another one. Toddlers may need you to clean up with them, especially if it's something like blocks with many pieces.

6. Help prepare food

Food preparation work is often a favorite among Montessori children. The interesting thing is they love activities like washing and cutting carrots and apples even if they choose not to eat the food they've prepared. This is because they are getting to use real tools and participate in the work of everyday life in a real way.

To try this at home, find ways your child can help in the kitchen, either preparing a salad alongside you or making a snack independently. Slowly introduce your child to the tools and skills needed in the kitchen, always watching for safety, but also giving him the freedom to work on his own.

7. Problem solve with a friend

While kindness and peaceful actions are always emphasized in Montessori schools, disagreements between children still inevitably occur.

Rather than acting as a referee, the teacher acts as a support and a guide, helping the children to talk to each other about what they each want and need resolve the situation.

To try this at home, next time your child has an argument with a friend or sibling, take a step back and see how they handle it on their own. Step in if it's becoming violent or escalating too much, but take the minimal action needed to help the children sort through the situation on their own.

8. Play independently 

As Montessori lessons are generally given one on one, rather than a group, the children spend a good deal of their time at school working independently, practicing the lessons they have already been given.

Playing with your child is a wonderful thing, but don't be afraid to tell her you're unavailable if you need to get something done. This will help her learn to play on her own, too.

To try this at home, if she's used to always playing with you, start with really short tasks. You might say something like "I'm going to unload the dishwasher and then I will come play with you." Slowly stretch the time she is comfortable playing on her own.

9. Take care of a pet

Pets are a big part of many Montessori classrooms, in part because they let us observe biology in real life, but also because they offer a great opportunity for the children to take care of another living being.

Children feed and give water to the pets daily and even help clean and scrub their habitats.

To try this at home, if you have a pet at home, show your toddler how to feed it or your preschooler how to scrub the pet's food bowl to keep it clean.

10. Think through a problem

Montessori teachers often answer a question with a question. "Where might you look for that? What should you do next? What are you missing?"

This encourages children to think through a problem rather than turning to an adult for the solution.

To try this at home, you can use guiding questions in the same way at home to help your child think more independently.

The journey to independence is a messy one. It is so worthwhile though to see a young child doing what he is capable of – helping to take care of himself and his community. This not only leads to independence, but gives him such a sense of purpose and pride in being a contributing member of the group.

You might also like:

An expectant mama's to-do list can feel endless… but here's the good news: A lot of those tasks are actually really exciting. Planning your baby registry is especially thrilling: You get a say in what gifts friends and family members will buy for your new addition!

But it can also feel a bit overwhelming to make sense of all the gear on the market. That's why we suggest mentally dividing your registry into two categories: items you need to prepare for your baby's arrival and items that sure would be nice to have.

Here at Motherly, our editors have dozens of kids and years of parenting experience among us, so we know our way around the essentials. We also know how mama-friendly the registry-building experience is with Target, especially thanks to their recently upgraded registry and introduction of Year of Benefits. Just by creating your baby registry with Target, you'll snag a kit with $120 in discounts and samples. The savings keep coming: You'll also get two 15% off coupons to buy unpurchased items from your registry for up to a year after your baby's expected arrival. Change your mind about anything? The Year of Benefits allows for returns or exchanges for a full year. And as of August 2020, those who also sign up for Target Circle when creating a baby registry will also get the retailer's Year of Exclusive Deals, which includes ongoing discounts on baby essentials for a full year.

Here are 10 items we agree deserve a spot in the "need" category on your registry, mama.


A crib to grow with your baby

Delta Children Farmhouse 6-in-1 Convertible Crib

First-time mamas are likely creating nursery spaces for the first time, and that can get expensive. Adding a quality crib to Target registry gives friends and family members the option to join forces to make a large purchase through group gifting.

$269.99

A safe + convenient car seat

Safety 1st OnBoard 35 LT Infant Car Seat

The list of non-negotiable baby essentials is pretty short, but it definitely includes a car seat. In fact, most hospitals will not allow you to leave after delivery until a car seat check is performed. We recommend an infant seat, which can easily snap into a base in your car.

$99.99

A traveling nursery station

Baby Trend Lil Snooze Deluxe II Nursery Center

It's hard to beat a good playard when it comes to longevity. This item can be baby's sleeping place when they're sharing a room with you for the first months. Down the line, it can function as a roving diaper change station. And when you travel, it makes a great safe space for your little one to sleep and play.

$99.99

A swing for some backup help

4moms mamaRoo 4 Bluetooth Enabled High-Tech Baby Swing - Classic

A dependable swing can be a real lifesaver for new parents when they need their hands free (or just a minute to themselves). Because many babies are opinionated about these things, we appreciate that the mamaRoo has multiple modes of motion and soothing sounds.

$219.99

An easy-to-clean high chair

Ingenuity SmartClean Trio Elite 3-in-1 High Chair - Slate

Our best registry advice? Think ahead. It really won't be long before your child is ready for those first bites of solid food, at which point you'll need a high chair. We like one that transitions to a booster seat atop an existing dining room chair.

$99.99

A diaper bag to share

Eddie Bauer Backpack - Gray/Tan

When you're a mom, you're usually toting diapers, wipes, clothing changes, bottles, snacks, toys and more. You need a great bag to stash it all, and if you're anything like us, you'll choose a backpack style for comfort and functionality. Bonus: This gender neutral option can easily be passed off to your partner.

$64.99

A hygienic spot for all those diaper changes

Munchkin Secure Grip Waterproof Diaper Changing Pad 16X31"

We can confidently predict there will be a lot of diaper changes in your future. Do yourself a favor by registering for two comfortable, wipeable changing pads: one to keep in the nursery and another to stash elsewhere in your house.

$29.99

A way to keep an eye on your baby at night

Infant Optics Video Baby Monitor DXR-8

Feeling peace of mind while your baby sleeps in another room truly is priceless.That's why we advocate for a quality video monitor that will allow you to keep tabs on your snoozing sweetheart.

$165.99

A comfortable carrier to free up your hands

Petunia Pickle Bottom for Moby Wrap Baby Carrier, Strolling in Salvador

A wrap carrier may be about as low-tech as baby items come, but trust us, this product stands the test of time. Great for use around the house or while running errands, this is one item you'll appreciate so much.

$39.99

A full set of bottles + cleaning supplies

Dr. Brown's Options+ Complete Baby Bottle Gift Set

Whether you plan to work in an office or stay at home, breastfeed or formula feed, bottles are a valuable tool. To make your life as simple as possible, it's nice to have an easy-to-clean set that is designed to work through the first year.

$39.99

Target's baby registry is easy to create from the comfort of your own home. Start your Target baby registry now and enjoy shopping with the Year of Benefits featuring exclusive deals available via Target Circle, two 15% off coupons, a year of hassle-free returns, a free welcome kit and more!

This article was sponsored by Target. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.


Our Partners

10 photos to take on baby’s first day that you'll cherish forever

You'll obsess over these newborn baby pictures.

Bethany Menzel: Instagram + Blog

As you're preparing for baby's birth, we bet you're dreaming of all of the amazing photos you'll take of your precious new babe. As a professional photographer and mama, I have some tips for newborn photos you'll want to capture.

Here are the 10 photos you will want to take on baby's first day.

Keep reading Show less
Life

29 last-minute family Halloween costumes you can pull together NOW

If your little one is going as a lion, coordinating is as easy as breaking out the khaki!

Here's how Halloween unfolds in most households I know: Mom spends weeks—even months—planning the perfect costumes for little ones. Then Halloween creeps up and they realize they need an outfit to coordinate with the kids' get-ups. What's a mom to do?!

Thankfully, there's no need for fear or pressure: There are so many ideas for parents that are easy to make and still super clever.

Keep reading Show less
Life