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I learned that fed is best when I couldn't breastfeed my son

I got to the point where I just said without emotion "tried it" whenever someone gave me advice to increase my supply.

I learned that fed is best when I couldn't breastfeed my son

Our birth plan was simple: Deliver at the birth center with our doula and midwife, stay there for four hours, go home, breastfeed forever, be happy. I'm lucky to have had a fairly short labor of nine hours but afterward was nothing like I'd imagined. I ended up transferring to the hospital to repair a third-degree tear. (Lovely, I know.)

We started to breastfeed at the hospital, and it hurt like they all said it would. My son had trouble latching but he was still nursing so I just tried to be patient. Lactation consultants came and went and I felt confident that I was going to be okay when I went home.

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I had a rough first few days as my body tried to balance out hormones. I was shaky, hot, sweaty, mad, sad and all-around miserable. I had no appetite and felt like I had the flu even though I didn't.

I called the midwife who told me this was normal and advised me to stay in bed and "breastfeed, breastfeed, breastfeed." So I did.

The next day, my son started crying like crazy when I tried to latch him and refused to nurse for a full 24 hours. The pediatrician told us to supplement with formula and I gave in because I felt sick, tired and I wanted to make sure my child was fed.

When he finally started to latch again, it was clear that something was wrong. He would get sleepy after only a few minutes of nursing, sleep for a few minutes, and then wake up crying and wanted to eat again. I spent a couple of days feeding him every 15 minutes and didn't wear a shirt or see anyone during that time.

I met with a lactation consultant who listed a whole slew of things that could potentially be wrong with him. I also learned that I had an infection on my nipple and he developed thrush, which made all of this infinitely more complicated and painful.

She suggested we try triple feeding. I nursed, pumped, bottle-fed, and made formula when I had no more milk to give. We made an appointment to see the ENT for a lip and tongue tie evaluation which ended up clear.

We took him to an osteopath who gently moved the bones around in his mouth with little pushes here and there on the back of his neck and head. This helped, but I continued to not have enough milk. I took supplements and tinctures, drank dark beer, pumped multiple times in an hour, saw another lactation specialist, ate almonds, stayed hydrated, pumped, nursed, pumped, nursed until I just couldn't do it anymore.

I got to the point where I just said without emotion "tried it" whenever someone gave me advice to increase my supply. I was exhausted. I woke up to pump every morning and sobbed because I would only get dribbles and my baby just wasn't getting that ever so magical breast milk despite all my best efforts.

I've heard so many different opinions about my son and me on our journey that I don't think I can definitively say what the root cause of all of this was. The opinion that made me feel the most at ease was from our ENT who flat out said that not every baby is a fit for every breast.

Until then, I'd been conditioned to think that since I was a woman, breastfeeding would be the most natural thing I've ever done. I forgot in all of this that all humans are different and that's part of the beauty of life.

I had to stop blaming my son, and I had to stop blaming myself for seemingly failing at this. I had to give up the notion that this was, in fact, a failure, because it wasn't. I had to let go of my notion that everyone around me was judging me for pulling out a bottle and powder instead of delicately unclipping my cute nursing bra.

This journey made me bake myself an entire humble pie and eat every last crumb. I started to look at breastfeeding and motherhood from a much different perspective.

I came to terms with the fact that feeding my baby formula and the tiny bit of breast milk I did have was infinitely better than having a baby that couldn't thrive and a sobbing mommy.

I realized that fed is best and started to be grateful that I live in a time where formula exists to provide nourishment to my growing child.

Every single mom out there is incredible.

I'm proud of moms who breastfeed exclusively.

I'm proud of moms who use formula.

I'm proud of moms who do both.

I'm proud of moms who have an unmedicated vaginal birth.

I'm proud of moms who use modern medicine to take away the pain.

I'm proud of every mom who chooses to do the best thing for her baby and herself.

The sisterhood of motherhood is incredible and I'm grateful to be a part of it and share my story.

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Why do all of my good parenting or baby-focused inventions come after they've already been invented by someone else? Sigh.

Like the Puj hug hooded baby towel, aka the handiest, softest cotton towel ever created.

Safely removing a wet, slippery baby from the bath can be totally nerve-wracking, and trying to hold onto a towel at the same time without soaking it in the process seems to require an extra arm altogether. It's no wonder so much water ends up on the floor, the countertops, or you(!) after bathing your little one. Their splashing and kicking in the water is beyond adorable, of course, but the clean up after? Not as much.

It sounds simple: Wash your child, sing them a song or two, let them play with some toys, then take them out, place a towel around them, and dry them off. Should be easy, peasy, lemon squeezy, right?

But it hasn't been. It's been more—as one of my favorite memes says—difficult, difficult, lemon difficult. Because until this towel hit the bathtime scene, there was no easy-peasy way to pick up your squirming wet baby without drenching yourself and/or everything around you.

Plus, there is nothing cuter than a baby in a plush hooded towel, right? Well, except when it's paired with a dry, mess-free floor, maybe.

Check out our favorites to make bathtime so much easier:

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Motherly editors’ 7 favorite hacks for organizing their diaper bags

Make frantically fishing around for a diaper a thing of the past!

As any parent knows, the term "diaper bag" only scratches the surface. In reality, this catchall holds so much more: a change of clothes, bottles, snacks, wipes and probably about a dozen more essential items.

Which makes finding the exact item you need, when you need it (read: A diaper when you're in public with a blowout on your hands) kind of tricky.

That's why organization is the name of the game when it comes to outings with your littles. We pooled the Motherly team of editors to learn some favorite hacks for organizing diaper bags. Here are our top tips.

1. Divide and conquer with small bags

Here's a tip we heard more than a few times: Use smaller storage bags to organize your stuff. Not only is this helpful for keeping related items together, but it can also help keep things from floating around in the expanse of the larger diaper bag. These bags don't have to be anything particularly fancy: an unused toiletry bag, pencil case or even plastic baggies will work.

2. Have an emergency changing kit

When you're dealing with a diaper blowout situation, it's not the time to go searching for a pack of wipes. Instead, assemble an emergency changing kit ahead of time by bundling a change of baby clothes, a fresh diaper, plenty of wipes and hand sanitizer in a bag you can quickly grab. We're partial to pop-top wipes that don't dry out or get dirty inside the diaper bag.

3. Simplify bottle prep

Organization isn't just being able to find what you need, but also having what you need. For formula-feeding on the go, keep an extra bottle with the formula you need measured out along with water to mix it up. You never know when your outing will take longer than expected—especially with a baby in the mix!

4. Get resealable snacks

When getting out with toddlers and older kids, snacks are the key to success. Still, it isn't fun to constantly dig crumbs out of the bottom of your diaper bag. Our editors love pouches with resealable caps and snacks that come in their own sealable containers. Travel-sized snacks like freeze-dried fruit crisps or meal-ready pouches can get an unfair reputation for being more expensive, but that isn't the case with the budget-friendly Comforts line.

5. Keep a carabiner on your keychain

You'll think a lot about what your child needs for an outing, but you can't forget this must-have: your keys. Add a carabiner to your keychain so you can hook them onto a loop inside your diaper bag. Trust us when we say it's a much better option than dumping out the bag's contents on your front step to find your house key!

6. Bundle your essentials

If your diaper bag doubles as your purse (and we bet it does) you're going to want easy access to your essentials, too. Dedicate a smaller storage bag of your diaper bag to items like your phone, wallet and lip balm. Then, when you're ready to transfer your items to a real purse, you don't have to look for them individually.

7. Keep wipes in an outer compartment

Baby wipes aren't just for diaper changes: They're also great for cleaning up messy faces, wiping off smudges, touching up your makeup and more. Since you'll be reaching for them time and time again, keep a container of sensitive baby wipes in an easily accessible outer compartment of your bag.

Another great tip? Shop the Comforts line on www.comfortsforbaby.com to find premium baby products for a fraction of competitors' prices. Or, follow @comfortsforbaby for more information!

This article was sponsored by The Kroger Co. Thank you for supporting the brands that supporting Motherly and mamas.

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Chrissy Teigen/Instagram

Chrissy Teigen is speaking out about her high-risk pregnancy, addressing fans from her hospital bed this week.

Teigen, who is expecting her third child with husband John Legend, says she's been dealing with non-stop bleeding during this pregnancy due to her "really weak" placenta. She's about halfway through her pregnancy but she's bleeding significantly.

"It's just hard because there's not much you can do," she explained in an Instagram story, suggesting that her baby boy is a strong little dude living in a damaged house. Right now though, there's not a lot her medical team can do to fix her baby's "house."

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She explained: "We're in that weird in-between time where you can't really do anything...I'm taking my progesterone, my iron—trust me, we're on it."

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