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The psychology of clutter: Why we hold onto ‘stuff’—and what that may be teaching our kids

It’s been a long day. And whether we have just walked in the door from work, or we have just braved a poorly timed late afternoon grocery store run with three tots in tow, the feeling is all too familiar and the same each time we get home.


Instead of walking in the door and exhaling into relief, the calm we hope for is met with even more stress as our eyes set upon a garage stuffed with mega-store mega-items, current and stale sports equipment, and boxes full of I-have-no-idea-but-I’ll-get-to-it-later.

We feel our stomach tighten as we walk through the door and our eyes are met with piles of laundry, magazines we don’t have time to read, a constant rotation of dishes on the table, on the counter, in the sink, in the dishwasher, and toys—so many toys—on the floor.

It’s all. too. much. And we wonder, "Is it just me?”

Just as working in an environment that is crowded, messy, too loud and full of artificial light has been proven to affect mood and health, so too does living in a space that is stuffed with things that bring us neither joy nor use.

With a modicum of knowledge of why we clutter and what it does to our psyches, plus a little self-awareness, we can learn to set the limits that can liberate us from the tyranny of the “too much” that prevents us from having the home we desire and the freedom to be our best mama.

We are not alone

Being overwhelmed by and in one’s own home is not as singular a situation as one might think. According to a study by UCLA's Center on Everyday Lives of Families (CELF) the amount of stress we experience at home is directly proportional to the amount of stuff we and our family have accumulated.

In the study, a team of professional archaeologists, anthropologists and other social scientists conducted a systematic study of home life in 32 middle-class, dual-income families with 2-3 kids of ages 7-12 in Los Angeles.

The scientists examined the amount of their stuff and found that women who feel their homes are cluttered tend to:

  • Be less happy with their marriages
  • Have unhealthy patterns of the stress hormone cortisol
  • Have difficulty managing every day tasks
  • Feel ineffectual
  • Have a harder time transitioning from work to home
  • Get increasingly depressed throughout the day
  • Having greater fatigue in the evenings.

The study also found that those unfinished home projects fall into the category of clutter and generate the same kind of stress that clutter does. Housework and home repairs compete for the attention of time and resource-strapped parents, turning home into more a place of increased demands than a haven from stressors.

Wives were found to be more affected by these stressors than husbands. Other research has shown that wives assume more of the responsibility for maintaining a home than husbands do, which may be more closely linked to how they see the home environment, and so they are particularly stressed out by the presence of clutter.

What about the kids?

If creating for ourselves a more restful home environment is not a big enough reason to declutter, perhaps the knowledge that our habits can be passed along to our kids will be.

"Our ability to organize begins at a young age through the modeling and messages we receive from our parents," says professional organizer, Regina Leeds. "Being raised in a home where we weren't taught the skills to maintain order, we inadvertently may fall into the habits of disorder and unfortunately pass along these non-serving habits to our children, rendering them incapable of organization until they take it upon themselves to learn the essential organizational skills, to eliminate, categorize, and organize."

Our stuff adds up

In our materialistic society, we are exposed to ads all day long that tell us what need to have to be healthy, handsome, happy, and successful. This can make it easy to accumulate all sorts of stuff we don’t really need and difficult to get rid of it due to the associated emotional baggage.

For many reasons, we can find ourselves emotionally paralyzed when it comes to deciding what to keep or get rid of, and that stuff winds up controlling us rather than benefiting our lives.

We can have sentimental attachments to things, or we may believe our things have hidden monetary value, but the main reason we hang on to things is fear. However misguided, we can fear the loss of security, status, comfort, and love when we throw things out.

Additionally, our possessions embody our memories, our hopes and our dreams, representing who we believe we are now, and who we believe the better version of ourselves will be in the future. So it comes as no surprise that it can be difficult to let go. "Tidying lets you stare in the face all of your core beliefs and what you’re living your life based on,” says Sue Rasmussen, a Minneapolis life coach and decluttering professional.

Others propose that discarding things we’ve purchased can be an admission of our failings, and holding on to them can also be toxic reminders of what we have not accomplished.

“You hold onto things based on hope,” says June Saruwatari, author of Behind the Clutter, a book that looks at not just the physical stuff that takes up room in our lives, but the mental clutter that keeps us from feeling productive and happy. "We hope to lose weight, hope to catch up on reading, hope to finish that abandoned project. But when we don’t, it’s hard not to feel like a failure about it…how many items do you need to hold onto before it starts controlling your life?”

Or, we may feel guilty for wasting money on things, so we hold onto them to justify our purchase. And especiallly, we are afraid of regret. We have all tossed something, only to wish we hadn’t later. But holding onto stuff by rationalizing we may need it one day is a recipe for just. too. much. stuff... Eventually everything piles up and cannot be ignored.

In a vicious cycle, the clutter that results from a reaction to feelings of emptiness, fear, guilt and anxiety can cause us to clutter more and can "compound into the reactive emotional pain” of more guilt and shame, fear, anxiety—and ultimately result in preoccupation and depression.

If clutter is the physical manifestation of emotions, then decluttering, believes Saruwatari, isn’t simply about getting our desk and closet in order, "It’s about relieving yourself of all the stuff you’re hanging onto from past careers, relationships, and unfinished business."

Our clutter tells a story

Just as our stuff can signify different emotional messages, it can also represent our identity. According to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, the things we struggle to get rid of the most are likely tied to our self-worth, as evidenced by the findings that, "People struggle the most to part with possessions that lack monetary or functional value."

This is why we may mourn the loss of our possessions from a fire but not necessarily their monetary value. The study found that parting with possessions that make us feel worthy can cause us to experience real loss and real grief—even depression.

Some of us find self-worth in our physical appearance, while others find it in approval.

Usually, whatever we hold onto the most represents what defines our self-worth. For instance, if we place a lot of value on success, it can be hard to let go of the things that comprise tangible evidence of our achievements, like awards or college transcripts. Tossing these things might make us feel less successful.

Or, if we value our relationships above all, it may be more difficult to get rid of gifts from people. Tossing unwanted or unused gifts can make us feel like we are being disloyal to the giver. This can apply to birthday and greeting cards as well, which can represent to us that we are loved and appreciated, proving that we mean something to others.

Clutter is not just a representation of our emotions, memories, worth and identity, but it also can be distraction from tackling deeper issues—and a buffer from pain.

"In addition to what we keep,” clinical psychologist Noah Mankowski says, "where we put our clutter usually corresponds to different emotional events." According to Mankowski, clutter in the attic or the basement might indicate an inability to let go of the past.

Or a cluttered bathroom might reveal body image issues, since this is where we’re most likely to be standing in front of a mirror naked.

And clutter in the living room might suggest blockages in our social life, while a cluttered bedroom might relate to issues surrounding our sexual self, fears of intimacy or gender roles. “When you clutter things, … you can’t see the surroundings. Which actually allows you to not deal with it—it’s a way of coping.”

It’s not what we have, but what we do

Decluttering can be hard to begin when we are at the end of a long day or the end of an even longer week. So, approach it with an attitude of gratitude. Being grateful that we can give to others our unused belongings—especially those in good condition—not only benefits others, but can help us rewrite the story of who we are.

In a series of studies recently published in the Journal of Marketing, researchers tested ways to help people donate items that were meaningful to them. They discovered that people would experience less identity loss from donating a cherished item if they photographed it.

Echoed in another study by Ohio State University's Fisher College of Business, associate professor of marketing Rebecca Reczek and her colleagues found that, "People are more willing to give up possessions if we offer them a way to keep the memory and the identity associated with that memory."

The results of the study demonstrate that, "It may be relatively easy to break old habits of clinging to possessions with sentimental value by photographing items to preserve the memories associated with them, making people more likely to donate those items by keeping the memories they represent intact."

In related experiments, other researchers confirmed that it wasn't just the memories associated with possessions that were keeping people from donating, "it was the identities linked to those memories.

For example, older parents may still feel connected to their identities as new mothers and fathers so not want to part with their infant’s clothes, the memories of their child’s infancy being connected to the clothing that helps to define who they are. “It is this reluctance to give up a piece of our identity that is driving our reluctance to donate," Reczek said.

So taking pictures can help us part with all those boxes of old baby clothes we no longer need, not to mention all the preschool artwork that comes home and stacks up. Even better, this strategy can also be implemented to help our kids pass along toys and books they have outgrown.

Our stuff in control

More than 75% of families use their garages solely to store the overflow of possessions (Arnold & Lang, 2007). Understanding the gateways of accumulation and the thinking behind them can help us recognize useless stuff when we see it, making it so much easier to get rid of it before it becomes clutter and a problem.

  • Set boundaries. Storing other people’s things can be a signal that we need to be more assertive about our space and set appropriate boundaries to not allow other people to clutter up our home with their stuff. This includes holding on to family heirlooms. Keeping dear Aunt Lillian’s china set might be sentimental, but it just becomes clutter if it is not going to be used and we don’t really want it.
  • Let go of the past. It’s okay to be nostalgic, but hanging onto dusty dried corsages from our high school proms or our too-small jeans from pre-baby days can be unhelpful reminders of the past and can prevent us from taking responsibility for creating a better tomorrow and moving forward in our life.
  • Trust in the future. Shelves of unopened or unused items can signal “just in case” thinking and a lack of trust in the future. They can also signal an aspiration to do or be something we’re not. Donating these items can free up space in our homes, hearts and heads and help us move on.
  • Tame the unfinished. 
Incomplete projects and half-finished remodels can suggest an unsustainable perfectionism, provoking a sense of failure. Prioritizing completion or scheduling removal of the abandoned helps us respect and accept who we are here and now, which can be empowering.

Home, sweet, neat home

The more we declutter, the better we get at it and the more aware we become of choosing what to keep, dump and seek in our lives. A little empty space helps makes room for a new way of living that enables stronger relationships and a stronger us through better physical and mental health.

Think of it this way: Getting rid of clutter is the ultimate form of self-care.

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When you become a mama, your definition of a smooth morning undergoes a complete evolution. Now, you consider it a win if your real alarm wakes you up and you get to drink coffee while it's still warm. The not-so-smooth mornings? Well, let's face it, that's a rough way to start the day.

When the wake-up call comes early and the coffee has been forgotten in the microwave, it may seem absolutely impossible to carve out any time for yourself. But a centered, confident mama is a happier mama, and there are some simple ways to sneak self-care into your morning to ensure you're putting your best face forward.

Specializing in quick, easy and (we must say) beautiful morning makeup routines, Woosh Beauty understands busy mornings, and has created an 'everything-in-one' makeup palette that is our new secret weapon for feeling like we made the effort to center ourselves, too.

Inspired by Woosh Beauty, here are five ways we've given our morning beauty routines a self-care makeover.

1. Make time (and space) for calm

As moms, time is priceless and that's especially true in the morning. Even if you're racing against the clock, it's worth it (trust us) to hit the pause button for just five minutes before tackling all the to-dos on your list.

With The Fold Out Face from Woosh Beauty, you have all the makeup you need (coverage and color) in one compact, portable palette. That means no scrambling to find your concealer. No opening, closing, then reopening and closing eyeshadows and powders.

Most importantly, no need to set up shop in front of your vanity/bathroom mirror/designated makeup space while keeping one eye on a constantly moving child. The Fold Out Face goes wherever you go and gives you everything you need in the flip of one flap—so you really can focus on yourself.

2. Create rituals that boost confidence

Even if you're going on your third day with the same yoga pants (they're so comfy!), it's important to make time in the morning to do something that will put a confident pep in your step.

While makeup has likely been part of your routine for years, motherhood can take a toll on your skin in new ways—which is why having 13 full-sized cosmetics, made from luxurious high-performing mineral-based formulas, allows you to erase the appearance of under-eye circles, perfect any imperfections and give yourself an effortless glow—all in less than five minutes.

So even if you don't have time to meticulously apply makeup, you can look and feel like you did. 😉

3. Allow our minds to drift 

For most of us, mornings mean going from zero to 60 in about five seconds flat. Before fully immersing yourself in the obligations of the day, it's nice to have just a few minutes to allow your mind to drift away from the to-do list. Woosh Beauty makes having mindspace while checking off "put on makeup" possible by numbering the order in which the cosmetics in The Fold Out Face should be applied.

4. Savor little luxuries

Before you go spend the morning driving kids around to the tune of nursery rhymes and eat a lunch of PB&J crusts, it can make a world of difference to your outlook to lavish in something that is all yours.

We love that Woosh Beauty makes that simple with The Essential Brush Set, a luxe collection of double-ended brushes that are numbered to correspond with the steps in the Fold Out Face, and come in a soft storage bag to keep them away from kids who may mistake them as paint brushes.

5. Be kinder to ourselves

Sometimes, a healthy self-voice for the rest of the day starts with rituals that remind us we're doing good for our bodies, too. By using Woosh Beauty products in your morning beauty routine, which are free of parabens, sulfates, gluten and fragrance—not to mention they are animal cruelty-free—you aren't just applying makeup, you're applying products and using tools that you can feel good about.

In the morning, a seemingly little thing like taking a few minutes for self-care is really a big thing that will continue to pay off with a beautiful outlook throughout the day—and with The Fold-Out Face from Woosh Beauty, it pays off with a beautiful look throughout the day, too.

Motherly readers can receive a 20% discount site wide using the code MOTHERLY at checkout.


This article was sponsored by Woosh Beauty. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Motherly and mamas.

No pregnancy and birth are exactly the same. Each of us has a unique story, and so do our babies. As Hilary Duff proves, a mother's second birth story isn't a just a rerun of her first.

Motherhood changes people, and for Duff welcoming her second child, daughter Banks, at age 31 was a very different experience than birthing her son, Luka, when she was 24. She went from a hospital to a home birth she explains in a two part interview for the Informed Pregnancy podcast.

And although Duff admits that at some points in her home birth she was scared and asked herself why she wasn't in a hospital "with all the drugs," she says she's so glad she did it and would totally do it again.

She's opened up about how she came to want a home birth, what surprised her about it and what helped her during her labor—and it's quite a birth story.

Looking back

During her first pregnancy, Duff says she started out wanting an elective C-section. She was 23 when she and ex-husband Mike Comrie found out they were expecting, and she didn't have a lot of peers who were having kids.

Her mom had C-sections for Duff and her siblings, and Duff thought that's what she would do, too. But in her second trimester she decided that she would try delivering first. She had an epidural for Luka's birth but he was born without a C-section.

More than five years later, during her pregnancy with Banks, Duff watched Ricki Lake's 2008 documentary "The Business of Being Born" and started considering a different kind of birth plan the second time around.

"I just started thinking that I wanted a different experience," Duff tells the host of Informed Pregnancy, prenatal chiropractor, childbirth educator and labor doula Dr. Elliot Berlin.

"I'm older now. I love motherhood more than anything—I never thought I would be this way, I never thought I could be so happy and so fulfilled. It's not easy, because being a parent is not easy, but it's just a joy. And I thought to myself that I want to like fully get the full experience of what it is like to bring a baby into the world."

Having support from Matt, Haylie and her mom

When Duff brought the idea up with her partner, Matthew Koma, he "was amazing," she explains. He had some questions, but was down to support Duff in her birthing choices.

Duff says she thinks her mom Susan and sister Haylie were "nervous to think about not being in a hospital" at first, but once Duff explained things a bit and got to talk to them about her doula and midwives, Haylie got really pumped about the idea.

"She was so supportive and amazing. I think my mom was a little more worried but she got behind me," Duff recalls, adding that because her mom had C-sections herself, even seeing Duff deliver Luka vaginally in a hospital was a bit of a different experience for her, so being there for the home birth was taking things to an unfamiliar level.

"The first time she saw me having a contraction in the house she was cooking bacon for Luka," Duff explains, adding that she had to pause the conversation she was having and squat down during the contraction.

"My mom was like, 'Oh no, oh no, oh no' and I was like, 'Mom, you can't do that all day...She got used to it. She's my mom and just having the comfort your mom brings was important to me."

Having her mom and her sister there was important to Duff, who was able to labor upstairs (where Koma had dragged the birthing pool out of Luka's room, where it had been temporarily used as a trampoline, and got it set up in Duff's room) when she needed to and then come downstairs to chill with her mom, sister and son when she could.

Even though she started feeling the contractions in the middle of the night, she still wasn't in active labor by the time her mom was cooking bacon for Luka in the morning.

"I think that was the most surprising part for me, thinking that it was going to progress a lot faster than it did and it just didn't," she explains, adding that at one point she went back downstairs and her son was watching a Marvel movie on TV.

"When I pictured my birth I didn't picture watching Guardians of the Galaxy on TV. Luka was like explaining the characters to me," she explains.

Her birth team 

Duff's partner, son, sister and mother weren't the only ones in the house with her the day Banks was born. She had a doula, a birth photographer who is also a doula and three midwives. "I definitely got through some contractions alone," says Duff "[But] I needed a tribe of people.

Her people helped her in the moments when things got really scary. Like when she worried she wasn't progressing fast enough, or when the pain was intense.

Duff found squatting, sitting on a birthing ball, and using a heating pad were all helpful at different points in the process. "Also some oils, I smelled a lot of clary sage oil and that felt really good," she explains. "I don't know why it felt really good to me."

What didn't feel good was being told to relax. "Any time someone would tell me to relax I felt like I would punch them in the face," she says, adding that Koma used the phrase one too many times.

"He was like, 'just relax babe', and I was like 'you're gonna die if you say that'!"

At the suggestion of one of her midwives, Duff started imagining herself melting into the bed with each contraction, and found that was helpful, too.

And although her contractions never got as long or as close together as her team expected them to, one of her midwives eventually gave her the good news that she was progressing.

"She looks at me and she's like, 'you want to go get in the tub?' and I just started crying," Duff recalls. "It was such a happy moment."

In the tub

Duff says when she was moved to the birthing tub, her brain really let her body take over. After the birth she estimated she was in the tub for about 30 minutes, but Koma told her it was really more like 90. "My brain disconnected," she says. "I remember telling myself that I don't need to be here for all of this."

At one point, she looked at one of her midwives and said, 'I'm really scared right now." Exhausted and unable to hold her body up as she channelled all her energy into pushing, Duff let her team hold her legs and arms while she pushed.

Having a baby

When Banks' head emerged, it didn't feel quite like the birth videos Duff has seen.

"Honestly, when I got her head out I was shocked by the feelings," she told Dr. Berlin. "I've seen women reach down and pull their baby out, and I couldn't do that…I was like, okay I'm there, I'm there, I've got to finish this job, but it was like really intense. It wasn't pleasant at that point. I think I wasn't fully in my headspace, my body was doing what it needed to do. It wasn't until her body came out that I could like want to grab onto her and bring her up out of the water."

Baby Banks needed some breaths from a midwife when she was first pulled from the water, but because her son Luka was also born looking a little blue, Duff says she wasn't freaked out. Once she figured out how to breathe, little Banks did "the most amazing thing," her mama recalls.

"They hand her to me, and I'm looking at her—and you know, babies are like floppy little worms, they just don't have any control—and she reaches up both of her arms right at my neck as to give me a hug. It was so clearly a hug."

Duff says the hug made her feel like baby Banks was saying something: "Like, good [teamwork] mom, we did it."

After the birth, Duff's team made her a smoothie using a chunk of raw placenta (a practice that the CDC recommends against, but many women choose to partake in).

She says she's not trying to push her choices on anyone else, and that she wants mothers to feel supported in whatever choices they make for themselves. "It's a very personal choice and it's not for everyone, that's for sure, she says.

Duff says that although she was at times overwhelmed and scared, she's so happy that Banks' birth story unfolded at home, and she would do it all over again.

To hear the whole interview, check out the Informed Pregnancy podcast.

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The moment you put your Christmas tree up, something changes in your home. Everything is a little more magical and it's a reminder that the holidays are finally here—but getting that tree is another story, especially with littles running around.

Packing the family up and heading to a Christmas tree farm sounds exciting, but it's not always feasible during this busy season.

Amazon to the rescue. You can now order *real* Christmas trees to your door from the comfort of your couch, compliments of family-owned tree farms. Shipping starts next week so grab your preorder before it sells out.

Here are some of their options:

1. 3-4 Foot Sno-Tip Black Hills Spruce

Hallmark Real Christmas Tree, Amazon, $59.99

BUY

4. 10-12 inch Charlie Brown Christmas Tree

Costa Farms Charlie Brown Christmas Tree, Amazon, $22.99

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Motherly is your daily #momlife manual; we are here to help you easily find the best, most beautiful products for your life that actually work. We share what we love—and we may receive a commission if you choose to buy. You've got this.

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Do you feel it?

That little spark ✨ in the air that comes around only during this time of year is starting to buzz and pop around us. There's nothing quite like the joy and excitement that comes with counting down to the holidays—especially with your kids who think that last Christmas was forever ago.

And what better way to count down to Christmas than with an Advent calendar? We've rounded up a dozen of our favorites that you can use year after year.

Here's to new traditions!

1. Beautifully modern 

The numbered ornaments on this "tree" slides down all the way to the bottom as you check off each day.

Advent Calendar Sliding Wood Tile - Black - Hearth & Hand™ with Magnolia, $29.99, Target

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2. Wooden classic 

This beautiful calendar is a showpiece. It lights up to create a beautifully cozy and festive scene.

Clever Creations Traditional Wooden Christmas Advent Calendar, $54.99, Amazon

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3. Kindness calendar 

The holidays are all about giving—and that doesn't stop with just material items. We can give in the form of kindness every single day, and this calendar helps us do just that.

My Kindness Advent Calendar, $75.00

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4. Wonderfully minimalist 

We love how super simple this fabric hanging calendar is. Tuck a treat inside each pocket for extra fun.

Advent Calendar - White - Hearth & Hand™ with Magnolia, $24.99, Target

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5. Santa’s delivery truck

Add a touch of whimsy with this sweet delivery truck featuring Santa and a snowman.

Northlight 14" Children's Advent Calendar Red Storage Truck Christmas Decoration, $42.89, Target

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6. Happy snowman 

All the joy of a snowman without the frozen fingers.

18" Snowman Advent Calendar, $18.99, Target

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7. Their very own tree 

Your kids can pick the ornament of their choice, as they decorate their very own tree each day.

Melissa & Doug® Countdown to Christmas Wooden Advent Calendar, $17.99, Target

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8. Stocking garland

We love the twist on a traditional calendar with this sweet garland of 24 stockings.

Northlight 8' Blue and Gray Christmas Socks Advent Calendar Garland, $29.69, Target

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9. Super simple display 

This one is no fuss, no muss.

Advent Calendar Wooden Stand - Threshold™, $29.99, Target

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10.  Treasure boxes 

Tuck treasures inside each day for your littles to discover.

Holiday Treasure Box Christmas Countdown, $19.99, Amazon

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11.  Santa's countdown 

We love the sweet little candy cane you can use to track each of the days on this Santa calendar.

Countdown to Christmas Plush Santa Advent Calendar, $12.99, Amazon

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12.  Reindeer banner 

Why does Santa get to have all the fun? With this sweet felt hanging, the reindeer gets to shine.

Good Ruby Advent Calendar for Kids, $29.99, Amazon

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Nameberry was born 10 years ago and to celebrate our 10th anniversary, we undertook an original analysis of baby name data from the Social Security Administration.

Our statistics identify:

  • Which girls' and boys' names were the hottest of the past decade
  • Which unisex names switched gender identities
  • Which international names have immigrated to the US
  • Which baby names will be most popular ten years from now
  • Which once-popular names are sailing toward extinction

Here are our original findings:

Most popular girls' names

The girls' names that increased the most in usage over the past decade include the surnames of a singing duo and a Golden Age screen siren, a sweet vintage name and new-fangled word names with elevated meanings.

  1. Everly
  2. Nova
  3. Adaline
  4. Paislee
  5. Harlow
  6. Royalty
  7. Henley
  8. Coraline
  9. Emberly
  10. Aitana

Most popular boys' names

The boys' names that have grown the most in usage over the past 10 years include the names of a Spanish footballer, a British Pakistani singer and a mythological strong man.

  1. Brantley
  2. Thiago
  3. Knox
  4. Jayceon
  5. Atlas
  6. Zayn
  7. Raylan
  8. Reyansh
  9. Huxley
  10. Brentley

10 names that switched genders

In a decade that brought transgender issues into the mainstream, many popular names switched from mostly female to mostly male or vice versa. Often the switch was inspired by a celebrity, such as Leighton Meester or Kyrie Irving, but that doesn't always work in the direction you guess it will.

Peyton, first popularized by football star Manning, and Lennon, the surname of Beatle John, have both swung toward the girls' side.

  1. Quinn – 28% to 80% girls
  2. Peyton – 45% to 77% girls
  3. Leighton – 27% to 74% girls
  4. Lennon – 20% to 65% girls
  5. Sutton – 26% to 64% girls
  6. Kyrie – 14% to 91% boys
  7. Raylan – 44% to 91% boys
  8. Bentlee – 32% to 84% boys
  9. Tru – 47% to 70% boys
  10. Milan – 36% to 64% boys

10 names that immigrated to the U.S.

This decade saw an explosion in online communication and an increasing globalization of everything from fashion to food to baby names.

Parents in the US have fallen in love with a range of names from around the world. Those whose usage have increased the most in the past 10 years, many inspired by international celebrities, include:

  1. Elowen +6450%
  2. Zendaya - +6350%
  3. Freya +741%
  4. Bodhi +736%
  5. Isla +481%
  6. Mateo +450%
  7. Gunnar +385%
  8. Saoirse +232%
  9. Cillian +229%
  10. Magnus +205%

Top 10 girls' names of 2028

Our analysis of the Social Security data also includes exclusive statistical projections of future baby name popularity, with calculations of the Top 1000 Baby Names of 2028.

We created an algorithm that analyzes each name's past popularity trajectory and projects its rank going forward, to help parents gauge the trendiness of the names they're considering.

Here, our predicted "Top 10 Names for Girls" 10 years from now, which include three new names, marked with an asterisk.

  1. Charlotte
  2. Amelia
  3. Harper*
  4. Emma
  5. Olivia
  6. Evelyn
  7. Mia
  8. Aria*
  9. Ava
  10. Sofia*

Top 10 boys' names of 2028

In a departure from patterns of the past, we see boys' names changing more than girls' over the next decade,

Here, our projected "Top 10 for Boys of 2028" including seven new choices marked with asterisks.

  1. Liam
  2. Mateo*
  3. Maverick*
  4. Noah
  5. Lincoln*
  6. Lucas*
  7. Henry*
  8. Theodore*
  9. Jaxon*
  10. Oliver

10 classic names dominating the next decade

Sure, there are always the trendy invented names and the celebrity-inspired rising stars. But there are also a handful of classic names we project will increase dramatically in usage over the next decade.

Get ready for a new generation of babies with these 10 hot classic names.

  1. Anastasia
  2. Declan
  3. Eleanor
  4. Eloise
  5. Emmett
  6. Ezra
  7. Iris
  8. June
  9. Luca
  10. Silas

10 names on their way out

As new names take the stage, others must by necessity fade away. These 10 once-popular names have dropped precipitously in usage over the past 10 years and may be headed for extinction or at least the deep freeze.

.

  1. Ashlee
  2. Braeden and Braden
  3. Breanna
  4. Brenden and Branden
  5. Isis
  6. Jaydon, Jadon, Jadyn, Jaden, and Jaidyn
  7. Devon and Devin
  8. Kaitlin, Caitlin, and Caitlyn
  9. Rachael
  10. Shannon and Sean

Originally posted on Nameberry.

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