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Ikea shared its delicious meatball recipe (and it’s so easy!)

Bon appétit or smaklig måltid, as they say in Sweden!

ikea meatballs

There's nothing quite like Ikea's Swedish meatballs and cinnamon rolls. Maybe it's because I'm always famished after shopping around the store all afternoon. Or, maybe it's the smell that makes them taste better, but everytime I walk past the food court I have to get them. They melt in my mouth in seconds, and without question, I'm forced to get seconds (maybe thirds) if my kids have a bite or two.

Since the quarantine started, I've made my own version of their meatballs but they don't come close. They've been too hard and rather bland. But now the popular Swedish furniture maker released the recipe for its famous meatballs and I couldn't be happier.

"We know that some people might be missing our meatballs, which is why we've released an at-home alternative which, using easily accessible ingredients, will help those looking for some inspiration in the kitchen," said Lorena Lourido, country food manager at Ikea.

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Here's how to make Ikea's delicious meatball recipe at home:

Ingredients for the Ikea meatballs:

  • 1.1 lb ground beef
  • 1/2 lb ground pork
  • 1 onion finely chopped
  • 1 clove of garlic (crushed or minced)
  • 3.5 oz breadcrumbs
  • 1 egg
  • 5 tbsp of whole milk
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions for the meatballs:

  1. Combine beef and pork mince and mix thoroughly to break up any lumps. Add finely chopped onion, garlic, breadcrumbs, egg and mix. Add milk and season well with salt and pepper.
  2. Shape mixture into small, round balls. Place on a clean plate, cover and store in the fridge for 2 hours to help them hold their shape while cooking.
  3. In a frying pan, heat oil on medium heat. When hot, gently add your meatballs and brown on all sides.
  4. When browned, add to an ovenproof dish and cover. Place in a hot oven, 350 degrees Fahrenheit, and cook for a further 30 minutes.

Ingredients for the Ikea meatball cream sauce:

  • Dash of oil
  • 1.4 oz butter
  • 1.4 oz plain flour
  • 5 oz vegetable stock
  • 5 fluid oz beef stock
  • 5 fluid oz thick double cream
  • 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard

For the sauce:

  1. Melt the butter in a frying pan. Whisk in the plain flour and continue cooking, stirring continuously for 2 minutes.
  2. Add the vegetable stock and beef stock and continue to stir. Add the thick double cream, soy sauce and Dijon mustard.
  3. Bring to a simmer and allow the sauce to thicken. Continue to stir.
  4. When ready to eat, serve with your favorite potatoes—either creamy mash or mini new boiled potatoes.

Bon appétit or smaklig måltid, as they say in Sweden!

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