February is a month of love, and for Watch What Happens Live host Andy Cohen, this February has been an extra special one, as his new son Benjamin was born via surrogate 10 days before Valentine's Day.

This will be Cohen's first Valentine's Day as a dad and he's never had so much love in his life as he does right now. Cohen appeared on the TODAY show this week via video chat and opened up about his overwhelming love for Benjamin. "I just sit and stare at him. I can't get over his head of hair. He's adorable, he's so cute," Cohen says.

It's a feeling many new parents can relate to, and so is the way Cohen describes meeting Benjamin as he was born.

"I was in the delivery room. They cleaned him up a little bit, I took my shirt off, and they put him right there, and he was so alert. He wasn't crying. His eyes were open, and we just stared at each other for about two hours, just looking at each other, and he was touching my face….it was just incredible, and I was hoping he was going to have a little hair on his head, and the kid's already over-delivering."

Talking about his decision to become a single parent, Cohen told TODAY: "It's not that easy for a single guy to do this on his own. It takes a village, as they say so I really wanted him, and the fact that he's here and he's so perfect and he's in wonderful health and I have great gratitude for my surrogate and all the people who helped me get to this place and I'm just thrilled."

In another interview with People, Cohen explains that he hasn't totally given up on potentially finding a partner to share parenthood with, but at 50, he just didn't want to put off his dream of fatherhood until he found his dream partner.

"I didn't want to wait. To me it would have to be a very special person to say, 'Let's do this together.' And I would love that, and that person could be having coffee down the street at this moment and I'll meet him soon," he told People.

"I think that I will probably be looking for different types of guys," the new dad explains. "I'll be looking for guys you want to bring home to Mom or bring home to your son."

If it happens, it happens, but for now, little Benjamin is the love of Cohen's life, and that's just fine. Benjamin doesn't need a second parent to thrive.

A recent study out of the University of Sheffield found children raised by a single parent are not negatively impacted by their parent's solo status. "These findings have clear implications for how single parent families should be understood, valued and supported. Stereotyping single parenthood as a problem is inaccurate and immoral," says Professor Nathan Hughes, of the University of Sheffield's Department of Sociological Studies.

According to the Sheffield study, what's more important than having two parents is having a positive relationship with the one you've got, and with other people in your life. In short, the village Andy was talking about. Looks like little Benjamin is one lucky kid.

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