Parenting in a pandemic is so hard and we're all doing our best to keep our kids healthy, and that means adhering to social distancing recommendations and contacting local health authorities if our kids have symptoms. We know fever, cough and shortness of breath are among the most common symptoms of COVID-19, but there is a less expected symptom parents are now learning about: so-called "COVID toes."


Back in early March a small study out of Italy documented skin problems on COVID-19 patients and found about 20% of the people in the small study (only 88 people) had a dermatological issue. Early data suggests kids are experiencing this symptom of COVID-19, sometimes in the absence of other symptoms.

On March 8, A 13-year-old boy in Italy was treated for foot lesions, and his pediatrician noted that a couple days later he developed the more typical symptoms of COVID-19. Now, dermatologists and pediatricians around the world are aware of and documenting cases of "COVID toes."

What parents need to know:

Reports of pediatric cases of COVID toes are limited at this time and most published reports are of adult patients.

This makes sense because the CDC's data suggests children are way less likely to become seriously ill if they contract the virus, compared to adults. But if your child gets a rash, lesion or papule on their feet or hands you should call your medical care provider and be on the lookout for other COVID-19 symptoms, like a fever.

The internet is calling this phenomenon "COVID toes" but it can also appear on a child's hands. In an interview with CTV News, Dr. Ebbing Lautenbach, chief of infectious disease at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine, says the lesions can look like blue or purple bumps and hurt or feel warm to the touch.
"They are often painful when you touch them and some people also describe feeling hot or burning," Lautenbach explains. "They've been demonstrated to be an early sort of physical manifestation of COVID, at least in some patients."

Bottom line: COVID toes are not an internet myth and are something parents should be on the lookout for. If you or your child has symptoms of COVID-19 call your doctor. If anyone is having trouble breathing, call 911.



Raising a mentally strong kid doesn't mean he won't cry when he's sad or that he won't fail sometimes. Mental strength won't make your child immune to hardship—but it also won't cause him to suppress his emotions.

In fact, it's quite the opposite. Mental strength is what helps kids bounce back from setbacks. It gives them the strength to keep going, even when they're plagued with self-doubt. A strong mental muscle is the key to helping kids reach their greatest potential in life.

But raising a mentally strong kid requires parents to avoid the common yet unhealthy parenting practices that rob kids of mental strength. In my book, 13 Things Mentally Strong Parents Don't Do, I identify 13 things to avoid if you want to raise a mentally strong kid equipped to tackle life's toughest challenges:

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