Menu

They don't have children yet, but Prince Harry and Meghan Markle made sure the children they love—from royal nieces and nephews to their respective godchildren—were a big part of their big day.


Even in the official portraits just released by Kensington Palace, the children (Prince George, Princess Charlotte, Florence van Cutsem, 3, Jasper Dyer, 6, Zalie Warren, 2, Remi Litt, 6, Rylan Litt, 7, Ivy Mulroney, 4, and the 7-year-old Mulroney twins, Brian and John) were a focal point.

The newly released image of the kid-filled bridal party is so fun and full of life, and just totally proves that this couple expected the kids in their wedding to be kids. Kids move in and out of frame, they smile wide, toothy grins instead of practiced smiles, they don't all look at the camera at the same time, but that's what makes this particular photo so beautiful (well, that and the gorgeous bride).

FEATURED VIDEO

The newly released photos are important to the couple and to the man who captured their love and the love they have for the kids in their circles. "It has been an incredible honor and privilege to document the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's inspiring journey of love, hope and family; from the engagement photos, all the way through to the official wedding and family portraits on Saturday," the couple's official wedding photographer, Alexi Lubomirski, noted on Instagram today. "This has been a beautiful chapter in my career and life, that I will happily never forget."

Along with the fun, kid-filled bridal party portrait, the royal couple did also get a group shot with all the important adults in their family: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, and Doria Ragland, Meghan Markle's mom.

The beautiful photographs captured an awe-inspiring day that will go down in history for many reasons and may see more brides swapping adult bridesmaids out for the important (and adorable) kids in their lives.

You might also like:

Try this: Write down your name and those of your parents and then your children. Then locate each letter of each name on the keyboard and note if it is located on the left or right side (use T, G and B as the middle line).

There should be more left-side letters in yours and your parents' names and more right-side letters in each of your children's names. Weird, huh? That's what some scientists thought, too, so they set out to determine why and discovered a similar pattern across five languages.

Keep reading Show less
Life